Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Sonnet 18

No description
by

Lindsey Hall

on 9 May 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Sonnet 18

By Morgan Dunn and Lindsey Hall Sonnet 18 Theme of Sonnet 18 The theme is love and beauty. Shakespeare is writing about a woman he loves dearly. He thinks she is beautiful and doesn't want her to ever leave him. Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee. Works Cited "Shakespeare Sonnet 18 - Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day."
Shakespeare Sonnet 18 - Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2013.
"Floral." Paintings Brought to You by Art Post Gallery, Located in Glenview
(north of Chicago). Featuring Bowman, Braun, Corthouts, Grey, Lee, Lieberman, Mario, Moran, Natalya, Nesvedba, Ochoa, PAterno, Ransley, Schofield, Van Beckum. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2013. The Meaning of Sonnet 18 Literal meaning He is talking about how someone is pretty and then, in lines three and four, how all good things come to an end. Eventually, the pretty May flowers die and summer can't go on forever. He goes on to say that beauty doesn't last forever, but i think that means someone's outer beauty doesn't last forever. A person's inner beauty stays with them until they die. Symbolic meaning The symbolic meaning of this poem is how beauty is precious and fades over time. Beauty is an opinion, and not everyone is beautiful through your eyes. Literary and Poetical Devices "So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee."
"see" and "thee" are examples of assonance and end rhyme.
The beginning, of each line, "So long...," is an example of repetition.
"fair from fair" is an example alliteration.
"Nor shall Death brag" is an example of personification.
There are multiple examples of imagery throughout the poem. Literary and Poetical Devices Jennifer Bowman, an award winning northwest artist, has been exhibiting and competing professionally for 16 years. Her paintings focus on colorful market scenes and realistic interpretations of yachts in tropical settings. She currently teaches and paints in her hometown of Anacortes, Washington. Jennifer Bowman William Shakespeare William Shakespeare was baptized on April 26, 1564, a few days after he was born. The exact date of his birth is unknown. His father was John Shakespeare, a glove maker, and his mother was Mary Arden. They had eight children, but many died in childhood. William Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway when he was eighteen. They had a daughter and a set of twins. In 1587, he traveled to London and became an actor and playwright. Shakespeare died on April 23, 1616 and was buried in the parish church. "A Short Biography of William Shakespeare." A Short Biography of
William Shakespeare. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2013. Shakespearean Sonnet Format Iambic Pentameter da-DUM-da-DUM-da-DUM-da-DUM-da-DUM Lines 14 lines
3 quatrains
1 couplet
10 syllables in each line Rhyme Scheme ABAB CDCD EFEF GG Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? A
Thou art more lovely and more temperate: B
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, A
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date: B

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, C
And often is his gold complexion dimmed, D
And every fair from fair sometime declines, C
By chance, or nature’s changing course untrimmed: D

But thy eternal summer shall not fade, E
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st, F
Nor shall death brag thou wand’rest in his shade, E
When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st, F

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, G
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. G TPCASTT Title "The Poetic Vegetable Garden." The Poetic Vegetable Garden. N.p., n.d.
Web. 13 Jan. 2013.
"Hamletscenen - Shakespeare PÃ¥ Kronborg Castle." HamletScenen. N.p.,
n.d. Web. 14 Jan. 2013. "Sonnet 18"
The 18th of 154 sonnets Shakespeare wrote. Paraphrase This particular Shakespearean sonnet describes the beauty of a certain woman by adding a twist of negativity by saying that appearances fade over time, while inner beauty lives forever. Connotation "Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,"
means that all good things come to an end. "Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,"
means that Death won't brag about her beauty. Attitude The attitude of this poem is romantic because he loves this woman he is speaking of. Shakespeare wanted to flatter this woman. Shift The shift occurs in this poem in the third line when he says, "Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May." He changes from saying how beautiful she is to saying that her beauty fades. Also, he changes attitudes when he says, "But thy eternal summer shall not fade." Title The title is only a number that represents a poem. Therefore, the title has no relation to the meaning of the poem. Theme The theme of this poem is inner verses outer beauty. In the beginning he is talking about outer beauty and how it eventually fades. Then, he talks about inner beauty and how it lives forever. "Summer Flowers"
Full transcript