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Astronomy In The Renaissance

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by

Kazu Prevost

on 14 November 2013

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Transcript of Astronomy In The Renaissance

Astronomy In The Renaissance By Kazu
Tycho Brahe
(1546-1601
Tycho Brahe was born in Denmark. He believed that the improvement of astronomy depended upon accurate observations. As a result an observatory near Copenhagen was established which became one of the finest observatories in Europe.
Brahe was the first astronomer to make corrections for atmospheric refraction (the change in direction of a ray of light as it passes from space into the atmosphere).

Copernicus
(1473-1543)
Copernicus was in fact a church official, but at heart just a student of math and science. After studying at the Universities of Cracow, Bologna, and Padua, Copernicus was appointed as a canon in the cathedral of Frauenberg by means of his uncle's influence. His interest in astronomy grew on him until it became his main priority. Alone, Copernicus would use the naked eye to observe the sky.
Galileo
(1564-1642)
Galileo didn’t invent the telescope. First things first: Galileo saw the telescope in Holland and just made a replica. However, Galileo is much more important to history than just a telescope thief. He discovered the moons of Jupiter, backed up Copernicus' theory, and even developed the modern approach to science through The Scientific Method.
Johannes Kepler
(1571-1630)
A German astronomer, was the first supporter of the heliocentric theory of Copernicus. In addition, he developed the three laws of planetary motion. In 1596, Kepler published Mysterium cosmographicum (Cosmopgraphic Mystery) in which he defended the Copernican theory as well as detailing his beliefs concerning the structure of the planetary system.
Johannes Kepler ( 1571 - 1630)
A German astronomer, was the first supporter of the heliocentric theory of Copernicus. In addition, he developed the three laws of planetary motion. In 1596, Kepler published Mysterium cosmographicum (Cosmopgraphic Mystery) in which he defended the Copernican theory as well as detailing his beliefs concerning the structure of the planetary system.
Introduction
Many of the greatest scientific advances in the renaissance were achieved by astronomers
Aristotle’s concepts about a spherical Earth and its location at the center of the universe.
Copernicus’ theory would be challenged and championed by subsequent generations. Astronomers like Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler would adjust the Copernican model Tycho by devising a compromise with the earth-centered system, Kepler by introducing elliptical orbits to the sun-centered system. Galileo was another astronomer who was an Italian physicist born on February 15 1564. His father wanted him to become a doctor. Galileo was gfamus for bringing the telescope to Europe. Also, the same year (1609), he looked at the Moon through a telescope and discovered it was mountainous and pitted. He also turned this device on the four moons of Jupiter, the planet Saturn, Venus and its phases, and the sunspots of the Sun

Galileo's
Telescope
Kelper's
Advancment
the Mysterium cosmographicum
Tycho Brahe's
Advancement
atmospheric refraction
Full transcript