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Backward Design

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by

Jen Snook

on 23 September 2015

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Transcript of Backward Design

December 2013
Jen Snook, CATL
STAGE 1
Determine Desired Results
YES!
NEXT STEP
NEXT STEP
SUMMARY
Desired Results
GOALS
Examples
Acquisition Goals
Foundational knowledge and skills

What will the student need to know and be able to do in order to proceed with deeper understanding?
Meaning-Making
Pose essential questions to assist in making sense of otherwise discrete facts

"Meaning" connects the dots and is earned
Transfer of Learning
Require application not just recall

Application occurs in new situations

Learners apply their knowledge autonomously
DESIRED RESULTS
DEFINED
BACKWARD DESIGN:
an instructional framework to develop and deepen student understanding by focusing on big ideas and transfer of learning
Backward Design
Learning goals are framed in terms of important accomplishments reflective of understanding
Establish goals for acquisition of knowledge, skills, transfer of learning and assist students in making meaning
10 MIN
Transfer Goals
Students will, without significant scaffolding, comprehend and evaluate complex texts across a range of types and disciplines, and they can construct effective arguments and convey intricate or multifaceted information.

Students will apply lessons of the past (historical patterns) to current and future events and issues.

Students will apply mathematical knowledge, skill and reasoning to solve real-world problems.
Meaning-making: Essential Questions
How can stories from other places and times relate to our current lives?

In what ways do the arts reflect as well as shape culture?

How does where we live influence how we live?
Essential Questions

Open-ended with no simple "right answer"

Is meant to be investigated, argued, looked at from different points of view

Raises other important questions

Constantly recurs; it can be asked and re-asked over time

Encourages active thinking about important ideas
Big Ideas
Enduring Understanding
The dilemmas of a representative democracy and separation of powers
need to know for understanding
Foundational Knowledge
Roles and limits of the 3 branches of government
important to know
Additional Info
Authors of "The Federalist"
nice to know
10 MIN
STAGE 2
Determine Needed Evidence
What kinds of evidence will show you that students understand?

What you assess and how you assess it follows Stage 1
STAGE 3
Develop Learning Plan
Activities and support should be derived from goals in Stage 1 and assessments in Stage 2
Performance Tasks
Check that students can apply learning to various issues, problems, situations and contexts

Establish real-world contexts, messiness, audiences and purposes

Reflect the 6 facets of understanding
Other Evidence
Includes conventional exams, assignments, observations

Can overlap with gathered performance-based evidence
DETERMINE NEEDED EVIDENCE
Using performance tasks and other evidence, assess understanding
The 6 facets of understanding
Explanation - knowledge of why and how

Interpretation - meanings and patterns

Application - think like an expert

Perspective - see from another point of view

Empathy - embrace new ideas and experiences

Self-Knowledge - know what you know (and don't)
ASSESSMENT
10 MIN
Performance Tasks
Design a product to explain a concept

Develop a plan for implementation

Conduct Research

Describe how it might feel to...

Reflect on your own habits of mind
Informal checks for understanding
observations and dialogues
tests, quizzes, and work samples
performance tasks
PLAN
Considerations
10 MIN
Scaffold

Meet each of the types of goals through various assessment techniques

Give deliberate feedback

Be specific with grading criteria

Make rationale and intentions transparent

Continue to refer back to goals and assessment criteria in Stages 1 and 2
Pre Assessment
What will you do to check students' prior knowledge, skill levels and possible misconceptions?
Progress Monitoring
How will you monitor student progress?

What are typical rough spots?

How will students get feedback they need ?
DEVELOP LEARNING PLAN
Make sure what you teach and how you teach it meet goals
Deliberate plan of study

Focus on understanding of big ideas

Focus on transfer of learning

Begin with the end in mind
1
2
3
RESULTS
EVIDENCE
EVENTS
Foundational Evidence
Guided practice, independent practice, summative and formative assessment

Link everyday actions to key concepts

Do a trend analysis

Critique various versions of a work

Identify logical and implausible theories

Propose solutions to an ineffective activity
Instruction
Should employ resources most appropriate to the goals (not simply work through a textbook)

Be responsive to differences in learners' readiness, interests and ways of
learning
goals
Determine Evidence
assessments
Learning Plan
road map
Questions?
Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005).
Understanding by design (2nd ed.).
References
Alexandria, VA: ASCD.
Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2011).
Understanding by design guide to creating high-quality units.
Alexandria, VA: ASCD.
Full transcript