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Laura Secord

Laura Secord
by

Monika Pyzik

on 15 April 2013

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Transcript of Laura Secord

Laura Secord Personal Life During the War During the war Laura and her family were forced to house American soldiers (let them live) in there own house. This was because they lived in Queenston and Queenston was very near the Canadian-American border.This was an advantage and disadvantage. The disadvantage is Laura was loyal to the Brit`s and she had to house the American soldiers. The advantage was she overheard the soldiers discussing a plan to surprisingly crush Britain their opponents who were led by Lieutenant Fitzgibbon. Laura Secord eldest daughter of Thomas Ingersoll and Elizabeth Dewey. She was born on September 13 1775 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Her name before she married was Laura Ingersoll. Her mother died when she was 8, leaving four little girls. Her farther remarried again and by the third wife he had a large family. In 1795 he immigrated to Upper Canada where he had obtained a township grant for settlement. When Laura married in about 1795. Laura was married to James Secord, and he was a young merchant of Queenston. She and James were to have 6 daughter and 1 son. She died in Chippawa (Niagara Falls, Ont.) on October 17 1868 at the age of ninety-three. Oldest Queenston, Upper Canada What She Did st When Laura overheard the soldiers discussing a plan to surprisingly crush Britain their opponents who were led by Lieutenant Fitzgibbon. She had a plan to tell Britain. James Secord (her husband) could barely walk from an earlier accident so Laura decided to take the 32 km (2o mile) journey herself. Her route took her 18 hours to complete. The dangers of her journey were many- wolves, wildcats, and rattle snakes were the most common animals. When she reached Beaverdams, Laura encountered Native forces who were allies of Britain. When they heard her news, they accompanied her to DeCew house were she was able to deliver her message to Lieutenant Fitzgibbon. As a result they ambushed the invading Americans and defeated them at the battle of Beaverdams, on June 24 1813. Won at the battle of Beaverdams, on June 24 1813. Ran 32km that`s about 20 miles to deliver her message. Reward???? FitzGibbon`s writings say that for Secord`s bravery and subsequently, Laura Secord was honored by the Prince of Wales with a gift of 100 pounds. Although she did get 100 pounds it did take a while. Mrs. Secord recived the gift when in about 1860`s. It took a lot of years. WOW. But the best thing is Laura had money for food then. Laura died in 1868. 100 pounds Facts It took Laura six hours to get over the Niagara Escarpment.



She has had her own stamp for sale.


She has her own plaque. Grave Letter from Fitzgibbon to Laura Secord from the year 1820. Letter This is Laura Secord's grave from 1868. Done By: Monika Pyzik The End
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