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What Does Health Mean to Individuals?

Core 1 Preliminary HSC
by

simon radford

on 23 February 2014

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Transcript of What Does Health Mean to Individuals?

WHAT DOES HEALTH
MEAN TO INDIVIDUALS?

DEFINITIONS OF HEALTH
PERCEPTIONS OF HEALTH
I
REVISION
Outline factors that have a significant influence on people's perception of their health.
DIMENSIONS OF HEALTH
RELATIVE AND DYNAMIC
NATURE OF HEALTH

Personal & of Others
Implications of different perceptions of health
Perceptions of health
as social constructs
Socioeconomic status
* Income
* Education
* Employment
Impact of the media, peers and family
HEALTH BEHAVIOURS
OF YOUNG PEOPLE

The positive health
status of young people
Protective behaviours
and risk behaviours







Accessing
Physical activity
Healthy eating
Body Weight
Drug use
Sexual activity
social networks
and support
Effect of multiple






risk behaviours
Early Meanings & WHO definition
Physical health, Social health, Mental health, Spiritual health
Discuss how viewing health as a social construct is likely to affect our perceptions of health.
Explain how the media can influence people's perceptions about health.
A daily newspaper continually features stories about the poor health status of young Australians. Write a letter to the editor that challenges the accuracy of these stories. Use statistics from current research to support your argument.
How we judge our health compared to other people or other points of time in our life
Dynamic refers to the constant fluctuations that occur in our level of health
The way health is seen or viewed by an individual or group
Individual level
Policy level
Perceptions of health are influenced by :_
* Our environment
* Our lifestyle and behaviour
* Family, peers and media
* Values and beliefs
* Our past levels of health
*Age and gender
These may be positive and/or negative. Provide examples accordingly!
Geographic location
* Urban
* Rural
* Remote
Cultural background
* Beliefs
* Attitudes
* Traditions
TREND- Reductions in mortality (especially injury, suicide and transport accidents) and morbidity (asthma, communicable diseases and injury). however, particular groups, ATSI, low SES, rural/remote dwellers not as good.
Generally classed as those aged 15-24
Health Areas of Concern
* Mental Health Disorders
* Injury (primarily MVA's and self-harm)
* Some chronic health problems and communicable diseases
Behaviours relating to:-
INFLUENCES ON THE HEALTH
OF INDIVIDUALS

PRELIMINARY CORE 1
BETTER HEALTH FOR INDIVDUALS

DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH
Sociocultural factors
Individual factors
Socioeonomic
factors
Environmental
factors
THE DEGREE OF CONTROL INDIVIDUALS CAN EXERT OVER THEIR HEALTH
MODIFIABLE DETERMINANTS
Those determinants that can be controlled or changed. Important factors include:-
* level of self-efficacy (our belief in our ability to bring about change)
* health knowledge and skills
* interest or desire
* attitudes to health
NON-MODIFIABLE HEALTH DETERMINANTS
Genetics- Examples include:-
* History of disease (CVD, certain cancers, diabetes, mental health issues etc)
* Down syndrome
* Haemophilia
Environmental factors, including:-
Geographic location, access the health care, availability of technology, pollution levels, UV radiation.
Changing influence of determinants through different life stages
Examples: Infancy and childhood large family influence, whereas adolescence greater peer influence.
Biological changes to brain, emotional maturity, increasing responsibility (jobs, mortgage, marriage, own children) and different social networks all impact on attitudes and behaviour related to health.
HEALTH AS A SOCIAL CONSTRUCT
Recognises the interrelationship of determinants
Challenges the notion that health is solely an individual's responsibility
Determinants of health







Interventions




Australia’s levels of health
and well-being






Resources and systems











Figure 2.26: A framework for Australia’s health
STRATEGIES TO PROMOTE THE HEALTH OF INDIVIDUALS
Health promotion involves activities that are aimed at enabling people to increase control over their health, to improve their health and prevent illness.
Environmental and Education support systems include:-
* Government legislation- e.g. drink driving, illicit drug laws etc.
* Government regulations- e.g. food labeling, advertising restrictions for tobacco, etc.
* Physical supports- e.g. hospitals, nursing homes, community health centres, etc.
* Economic supports- e.g. government funding for health and welfare.
* Social supports- those trained and equipped to assist in health care. E.g. doctors, nurses, counsellors, social workers, etc.
* Educational supports- schools, websites, etc.
RESPONSIBILITY FOR HEALTH PROMOTION
INDIVIDUALS
GOVERNMENTS
* COMMONWEALTH
* STATE
* LOCAL GOVERNMENT
NON-GOVERNMENT ORGANISATIONS (NGO'S)
E.G CANCER COUNCIL, NATIONAL HEART FOUNDATION, REACHOUT
INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS
* WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
COMMUNITY GROUPS AND SCHOOLS
HEALTH PROMOTION APPROACHES AND STRATEGIES
Lifestyle and behavioural approaches
Preventative medical approaches
Public Health approaches
Involves establishing programs, policies and services that create environments that support health. Includes health promoting schools and workplaces.
THE OTTAWA CHARTER AS AN EFFECTIVE HEALTH PROMOTION FRAMEWORK
PRINCIPLES OF SOCIAL JUSTICE
EQUITY
The allocation of resources according to the needs of individuals and populations, the goal being to achieve equality of outcomes.
DIVERSITY
Variety, or difference, between individuals and groups of people
SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENTS
Genetics
&
Attitude
Family
Peers
Media
R
e
l
i
g
i
o
n
Culture
Tobacco smoke
Climate change
Access to
health services
Access to technology
Geographic location
Education
Employment
Income
The social determinants discussed in the following clip differ to the syllabus. In addition, examples are NOT Australian, but still show the power of community. Overall, viewing should enhance your understanding of this topic.
Primary
Secondary
Tertiary
Based on your knowledge of the dimensions of health, answer the following question.
Evaluate the validity of Dr Avery's view of health.
Full transcript