Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Analyzing Robert Frost's Style

Period 3 ELA 8
by

aslam mir

on 12 November 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Analyzing Robert Frost's Style

Analyzing the Poet's Style
-Ayesha Aslam-Mir-

My long two-pointed ladder's sticking through a tree
Toward heaven still,
And there's a barrel that I didn't fill
Beside it, and there may be two or three
5
Apples I didn't pick upon some bough.
But I am done with apple-picking now.
Essence of winter sleep is on the night,
The scent of apples: I am drowsing off.
I cannot rub the strangeness from my sight
10
I got from looking through a pane of glass
I skimmed this morning from the drinking trough
And held against the world of hoary grass.
It melted, and I let it fall and break.
But I was well
15 Upon my way to sleep before it fell,
And I could tell
What form my dreaming was about to take.
Magnified apples appear and disappear,
Stem end and blossom end,
20
And every fleck of russet showing clear.
My instep arch not only keeps the ache,
It keeps the pressure of a ladder-round.
I feel the ladder sway as the boughs bend.
And I keep hearing from the cellar bin
25
The rumbling sound
Of load on load of apples coming in.
For I have had too much
Of apple-picking: I am overtired
Of the great harvest I myself desired.
30
There were ten thousand thousand fruit to touch,
Cherish in hand, lift down, and not let fall.
For all
That struck the earth,
No matter if not bruised or spiked with stubble,
35
Went surely to the cider-apple heap
As of no worth.
One can see what will trouble
This sleep of mine, whatever sleep it is.
Were he not gone,
40
The woodchuck could say whether it's like his
Long sleep, as I describe its coming on,
Or just some human sleep.

After Apple Picking
Range-Finding


The battle rent a cobweb diamond-strung
And cut a flower beside a ground bird's nest
Before it stained a single human breast.
The stricken flower bent double and so hung.
5 And still the bird revisited her young.
A butterfly its fall had dispossessed
A moment sought in air his flower of rest,
Then lightly stooped to it and fluttering clung.

On the bare upland pasture there had spread
10 O'ernight 'twixt mullein stalks a wheel of thread
And straining cables wet with silver dew.
A sudden passing bullet shook it dry.
The indwelling spider ran to greet the fly,
But finding nothing, sullenly withdrew.



The Pasture


I'm going out to clean the pasture spring;
I'll only stop to rake the leaves away
(And wait to watch the water clear, I may):
I sha'n't be gone long.—You come too.

I'm going out to fetch the little calf
That's standing by the mother. It's so young,
It totters when she licks it with her tongue.
I sha'n't be gone long.—You come too.




October


O hushed October morning mild,
Thy leaves have ripened to the fall;
Tomorrow’s wind, if it be wild,
Should waste them all.
The crows above the forest call;
Tomorrow they may form and go.
O hushed October morning mild,
Begin the hours of this day slow.
Make the day seem to us less brief.
Hearts not averse to being beguiled,
Beguile us in the way you know.
Release one leaf at break of day;
At noon release another leaf;
One from our trees, one far away.
Retard the sun with gentle mist;
Enchant the land with amethyst
.
Slow, slow!
For the grapes’ sake, if they were all,
Whose leaves already are burnt with frost,
Whose clustered fruit must else be lost—
For the grapes’ sake along the wall.


The Road Not Taken


Two roads diverged in a yellow wood

And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood

And looked down one as far as I could
5 To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
10 Had worn them really about the same
,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
15 I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
20 And that has made all the difference.

Robert
Frost

A

B
A
A
B

C
D
C
C
D

E
F
E
E
F

G
H
G
G
H

Rhyme

- Simple repeating ABAAB pattern each stanza
A
B
AA
B
C
D
CC
D
E
F
EE
F
G
H
GG
H
1
2
3
4
Repetition
imagery
imagery
simile
personification
alliteration
imagery
Figurative Language/Devices
Structure

-frequent use of 9 syllable lines
-Use of meter in lines 8, 9, 12, 13,
15, 17, and 19
A
B
B
A
C
C
D
E
D
F
G
F
H
I
I
I
H
J
K
J
H
L
K
M
L
M
N
O
O
N
P
P
Q
R
S
Q
R
T
U
T
U
S


imagery
imagery
The whole poem overall is a metaphor.
imagery
alliteration
imagery
repitition
*no specific rhyme pattern
symbolism/metaphor
personification
Structure/ Rhyme
Figurative Language/ Devices
A
B
A
B
B
C
A
C
D
A
C
E
D
E
F
F
C
B
G
G
B
1 stanza
alliteration
alliteration, repitition
alliteration
personification
repitition
imagery
metaphor




5




10




15




20
Rhyme and Structure

- several 10, 9, 8 syllable lines (little use of meter)
- some 4, 5 syllable lines
repitition
Figurative Language and Devices
overall metaphor
overall metaphor
A
B
B
A
A
B
B
A

C
C
D
E
E
D
Rhyme and Structure
1
2
imagery, metaphor
imagery
personification
Figurative Langage and Devices
A
A
B
B
iambic pentameter- 5 feet (10 syllables)
4 feet (8 syllables)
repitition
imagery
Structure and Rhyme
Figurative Language/ Devices






5
2 stanza
1 stanza
42 lines
1
iambic pentameter- mostly 5 feet lines yet some 2,3 feet and 11 syllable lines
5 feet lines (10 syllable lines) excluding few 11 syllable lines
[ lines 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 12]
What makes Robert Frost's Poetry Unique?
Robert Frost's poetry is unique because of his specific style. Robert Frost incorporates themes based on nature and the countryside and language based these settings with metaphor and symbolism. With imagery and repetition, he uses meter and same syllable lines to complete his poems. Poems written by Frost usually have many lines in a single stanza or few lines in a number of stanzas. Using these to convey a specific impact or emphasis on certain lines, Frost conveys deeper messages than just a naturistic picture. It is easy to identify Frost as the author of a poem with this unique style and these strategies.
1
2
In this poem, imagery is used to convery the mood Frost is trying to get across through metaphor, one of hopelessness or death as he is showing a deep sleep and strange dreams.
( The ache in his feet, the breaking glass, the apples left for cider )
Repitition and descriptive language are used to create the image of the pasture, while the metaphor nehind the poem is suggesting a deeper theme, where one person takes another with them on a journey or errand.
The personification and imagery create a mood in which creatures are hiding in order to not be hunted on the range. The theme could be about staying in hiding to avoid destruction caused by other forces, as a battle is mentioned in the beginning.
Here, personification and repitition are used to show October as a force that brings change.
The overall metaphor and mood created her create a theme based on the pressure of making decisions, and how to uncommon one can make a bigger or better differenc.
Full transcript