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Well-Being Support Materials

Presentation in support of Impact Officer Training and Development City Year UK
by

Simon Claridge

on 11 October 2016

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Transcript of Well-Being Support Materials

The Johari Window
Giving and Receiving Feedback
Would you rather...?

1. Visit the doctor or the dentist?
2. Eat broccoli or carrots?
3. Watch TV or listen to music?
4. Own a lizard or a snake?
5. Have a beach holiday or a mountain holiday?
6. Be an apple or a banana?
7. Be invisible or able to read minds?
8. Be hairy or completely bald?
9. Be the most popular, or the cleverest person you know?
10. Make headlines for saving someone's life or winning the Nobel prize?
11. Go without television or fast food for the rest of your life?
12. Have permanent diarrhoea or permanent constipation?
13. Be handsome and stupid or be ugly and really clever?
14. Always be cold or always be hot?
15. Not hear or not see?
16. Eliminate hunger and disease or bring lasting world peace?
17. Be stranded on a desert island alone or with someone you don't like?
18. See the future or change the past?
19. Be three inches taller or 3 inches shorter?
20. Wrestle a lion or fight a shark?
Workshop aims and learning outcomes
By the end of the session Impact Officers will:

1. Understand the principles of the Johari Window
2. Be able to differentiate between the different quadrants
3. Experience, through some pairs work, practice a short interview
4. Feel a greater degree of confidence to use the Johari Window in their work with Corps Members
5. Experience a short 'sharing circle' (if time)
known by self
unknown by self
Ask
Tell
Known by others
unknown by others
self-disclosure
feedback
shared
discovery
others
observation
self-awareness
open/free area
blind area
hidden area
unknown area
1
2
3
4
Open
Blind
Unknown
Hidden
The themes for this session were:
Empathy
Trust
Communication
(Giving and receiving) Feedback
Active listening
Diffusing conflict
Reflecting on the exercise and in your role as an Impact Officer:

Which quadrant do you think the questions referred to?

How might the Johari Window help you in your work supporting CM’s as well as your overall areas of responsibility?

The importance of 'crafting' the right question
On your own decide whether you think the the questions are closed or open
?
H
w w w w
w
Some useful prompts

- Remain silent
- Repeat the question, or the statement
- Ask for an example
- Ask for clarification
- Ask for more details
- Summarise

Coping with stress and anxiety (Well-Being)
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the session participants will:

Gain knowledge of self-agency and self-efficacy with the confidence to apply as a life-skill

Gain knowledge of Mazlow's hierarchy of needs as the building blocks of self-care and motivation

Understand the difference between stress and anxiety, how it can affect us

Learn and take away healthy strategies for coping

Have comprehensive knowledge of how City Year will support you during your year of service

Resilience: An ability to cope and to know where and how to get the resources you need to meet challenges and carry on.
?
What do we mean when we speak about agency and self-efficacy
The opposite of passivity is agency or
self-efficacy


(Galassi & Bruch, 1992 & Bandura 1977, 1980, 1982, 1986, 1991, ; Locke & Latham, 1990 in Egan, Gerard. The Skilled Helper. 5th ed. Belmont: Clairemont, 1994. Print.
It has been suggested that people's expectations of themselves have a lot to do with their willingness to apply the effort to cope with difficulties, the amount of effort they will expend and their persistence in the face of obstacles.
People tend to take action if two conditions are in place:

1. They see that certain behaviour will most likely lead to certain desirable results or accomplishments (outcome expectations) Goals

2. They are reasonably sure that they can successfully engage in such behaviour (self-efficacy expectations) Internal Resources
What does coping mean?
What does coping mean to you?
Stress and Anxiety
Stress occurs when pressure exceeds our perceived ability to cope
Anxiety can be a mood, a feeling, an emotional response, a symptom. What is common is it's generally unpleasant in nature and it can distort how we see things and how we think about things.
Some of the things that can happen in terms of how we think are:

All or Nothing Thinking: we see things in black and white terms.

Labelling: we 'rate' ourselves, others or the universe, as opposed to rating our skills, areas for development or specific behaviours

Focusing on the negative: We focus only on the negative aspects of things, as opposed to keeping life or events in perspective

Discounting the positive: We 'rate' or classify anything positive as unimportant
Mind-Reading: We 'read' negative things in people's behaviour towards us

Magnification: We tend to blow things out of proportion

Minimisation: We make excuse for our successes or strengths

Emotional Reasoning: We evaluate situations based on how we feel

Blame: We tend to blame others for problems that may have happened instead of accepting our bit of responsibility

Personalisation: We take full responsibility and blame ourselves unfairly for something for which we are not totally responsible
When stress levels get out of control we feel anxiety which affects our well-being on four different areas:

Cognitive level
Emotional level
Behavioural level
Physiological level
In groups discuss:

You have a headache pretty much on a regular basis every week. What would be some healthy options for coping with it?

Would it be a good coping strategy if the headache wasn't even there?

What would you do to cope if you knew you were going to get a headache in an hour?
You and 'your agency'
getting it sorted
You and 'your agency'
getting it sorted too :)
Caroline Gielnik

Worklife Support

Helping organisations to create a thriving workplace

Talk to your IO
Talk to your IO's Manager
Talk to the Pastoral Care and Well-Being Manager
Make use of EVAP it's free and you can use it as many times you need to
Emotional Intelligence and Sharing Circle FY16 (Well-being)
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the workshop participants will:

1. Show knowledge of 2 areas of the brain having a strong influence on behaviour

2. Show knowledge of the impact on behaviour of those 2 areas of the brain

3. Have experienced reflecting on their own experience of and emotional response to particular situations

4. Have experienced the practical application of EI coaching through a facilitated 'Sharing Circle'
The Emotional Brain
TFB
Thoughts - Feelings - Behaviour
Emotional Hijacking
T
FB
Thoughts
- Feelings - Behaviour
"I just couldn't think straight"
"I don't know what came over me"
The Amygdala and Neocortex in Action
Reflection
1. In pairs share with eachother a time when you've been aware that an emotional hijack occurred.

2. What happened?, Where were you?

3. When you reflect on that moment in time is it possible that another event could have triggered it? i.e. was it the moment itself?, or something that remained unresolved from before?
Coaching for EI and the Sharing Circle
Ripples

“Few will have the greatness to bend history; but each of us can work to change a small portion of the events, and in the total of all these acts will be written the history of this generation. . . .It is from numberless diverse acts of courage . . . [and] ... belief that human history is shaped. Each time a person stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centres of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.”

Robert F. Kennedy, Day of Affirmation address, University of Cape Town

You
Your Corps Members
Children and older students
It's all about practice and practice at every level
Knowing one's emotions:
Self-awareness - recognising a feeling as it happens. Monitoring feelings from moment to moment.
Managing emotions:
Emotional competence. Handling feelings; ability to recover quickly from upsets and distress;
Motivating oneself:
Aligning emotions in order to reach goals; self-control and self-discipline; delaying gratification and stifling impulsiveness
Recognising emotions in others:
Empathy - the ability to recognise, identify and feel what someone else is feeling.
Handling relationships:
The ability to manage emotions in others; social competence; leadership skills
Gender and Development
There are gender differences in the context of emotional education. Notably girls tend to receive more emotional education from their parents than boys. Girls also develop language skills more quickly, finding it easier to articulate. Behavioural scientists have looked in detail at age 13.
Girls at 13
Are adept at reading verbal and nonverbal emotional signals and expressing feelings.
Experience a wide range of emotions with intensity and volatility.
Have learned to use tactics like ostracism, gossip, and indirect vendetta's as substitutes for aggression.


Boys at 13
Are adept at expressing anger.
Minimise emotions having to do with vulnerability, guilt, fear, hurt.
Are confrontational when angry.
Take pride in a lone, tough-minded independence and autonomy.


Much of the theoretical material presented is taken from 50 Activities for Teaching Emotional Intelligence

SCHILLING, D.
50 activities for teaching emotional intelligence
In-text: (Schilling, 1996)
Bibliography: Schilling, D. (1996). 50 activities for teaching emotional intelligence. Spring Valley, Calif.: Innerchoice Pub.
Sharing Circle guidelines, discussion topics and discussion guides
Managing your team in the school context FY16 (Well-being)
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the session IO's will:
Understand different types of school
Have knowledge of the structure and staffing of schools
Have knowledge of the priorities, constraints and drivers under which schools operate
Have reflected on their experience of leading corps member teams in school
Have knowledge of motivation and Situational Leadership to lead teams
Another brick in the wall
Types of school where City Year UK works
Primary
Junior
Secondary
Academy
Local Authority/Community
Voluntary Aided/Controlled
Gender
Large/Small
School context, Priorities & Drivers
Ofsted - grade, date, identifies areas
Government accountability - legislation, curriculum
Safeguarding - child protection and safety
Assessment, attainment and progress - examinations, tests and results
Budget - staffing, resources, training, site specific issues
Strategic Planning - SIP/SDP
Stakeholder accountability - Govenors, community context
?
What about...

Whole child growth, development and other learning opportunities beyond the class room

It may depend upon...
School leadership takes many forms ie:
Headteacher
SLT
CY PoC
Class Teacher

The City Year Impact Officer has to manage these variables in order to deliver on the service level agreement, via the Corps Members, to best effect.
School Leadership
School leadership i.e. the Headteacher shapes and drives the school ethos and values
City Year has to work within the established ethos, values, culture and climate
The IO must quickly tune into the style and approach of the Headteacher and SLT and the established school ethos to deliver the CY Programme
In order to do so the IO must coach and develop their team to deliver the CY offer within the framework of the existing school culture, climate and leadership approach
Ethos and Values
Pause and
Reflect
A time this term when things at school have worked really well
The
Students
Students
City Year
WSWC
Corps
Members
School
You, the
IO
Impact
Officer
City Year
WSWC
Corps
Members
School
The IO as a manager in school
Moccasins
IO
Head
Teacher
SLT
Pastoral
Staff
Corps
Member
Governors
Parents/
Carers
Classroom
Teacher
City
Year UK
Managing your team in school FY16 (Well-being)
Learning
Outcomes
By the end of the session IO's will:

Have an understanding of Corps Member Centred Development
Be able to apply that understanding in motivating their teams according to:
Adair's model of motivation and leadership
Blanchard's model of Situational Leadership measuring confidence and commitment to serve
Have experienced doing a brief assessment of the CM's against the SL criteria as a means of managing the individuals within their team
Leading your teams according to
Service
,
Group
and
Individual
Service
Group
Individual
Service
Group
Individual
Service
Group
Individual
Service
Group
Individual
Adair, J. (1986). Effective team building. London: Pan Books.
Corps Member
Centred Development
?
When you think about your team and the individuals that make it up; do they work for you, or you on their behalf.
X
Y
If you know the nature of water, it's easier to row a boat - Chinese Proverb
Motivation
?
Do Corps Members do a more important job than a Premier League footballer
50/50
Internal
External
Some golden rules about motivation:
Be motivated yourself
Identify people who are highly motivated
Treat each person as an individual
Set realistic and challenging targets
Remember that progress motivates
Create a motivating environment
Provide fair rewards
Give recognition

Abakhwezeli (Zulu) 'the one who keeps the fire going'


Encourage too: give hope, confidence, spirit and give active help as well.
Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations. —Peter Drucker
?
How do you know the best way to lead the members of your team in order that they can be the best they can
Situational
Leadership
Fitness to serve
Motivation to serve
Competence
is a function of
knowledge
and
skills
gained from
education
,
training
and/or
experience
Commitment
is a combination of
confidence
and
motivation
This Year's
For You
- FY16 (Well-being)
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the sessions participants will have:

A deeper understanding of teamwork and will have experienced working in teams in a different context
An understanding of themselves as a person in the context of how they contribute to teams according to Belbin
Reflected on their personal development in the context of future careers and identified choice sessions to build their understanding of employer requirements
Aardverk
30
Minutes
Elect
a
leader
Complete
the 5 tasks within the allocated time
Belbin Team Roles
On your own look at the team roles and highlight the 2 that best represent you
Then look at the Circle and identify whether your role is Social, Thinking or Action, if your 2 choices are in different sections then choose number 1.
Choice
Sessions
In your teams please agree the top 3 choice sessions that you would benefit from
Managing Money
Diet and Exercise
Motivation
Networking
Time Management
People Skills
Teamwork
Creativity and Problem Solving
Inclusion and Equality
Understanding Power/Hierarchy
2 Blank for your own ideas
Head of Site
Welcome to London
'We inter
nalise our oppression and
(unless e
ncouraged to do otherwise)
Accept t
he destiny that the system
holds in
store for us' (Freire, 1996)
162
+
Si Claridge
07951 780449
sclaridge@cityyear.org.uk
Yammer: Si Claridge
Twitter @siclaridge
If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far, go together
Head of Site
Welcome to London
Si Claridge
07951 780449
sclaridge@cityyear.org.uk
Yammer: Si Claridge
Twitter @siclaridge
If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far, go together
Overview of City Year, Vision and Programme
City Year believes that young people can change the world and we recruit talented and passionate young people who are driven to make a difference
City Year is a youth social action charity which challenges 18-25 year old's to tackle educational inequality through a year of full time voluntary service. Young people known as corps members, spend the year:
Serving full time in school in deprived communities as tutors, mentors and role models

Leading before school, in-school and after-school programmes, enrichment activities and clubs

Receiving professional training and support linked to both their service in schools and employability after City Year - LACY
200
Corps members serve in 24 primary and secondary schools in London, Birmingham and Manchester

Their role from Monday to Thursday:

Welcoming children at the school gates
to encourage punctuality and attendance
Providing in class support to
boost attainment
Supporting groups of 'focus list' students with literacy, numeracy and building their academic confidence
Present at break times,
reducing disruptive behaviour
Leading breakfast and after school clubs
to enrich the school experience
On Fridays, corps members receive leadership development and employability training

Comptencies:
Communication, Resilience, Creativity, Whole School Whole Child, Relationships, Leadership, Managing Feelings, Emotional Intelligence, Coping Skills, Problem-solving

Workshops:
Career exploration, Interview skills, Presentation skills, Networking skills, Public speaking, Creativity, Negotiation skills, Project management

Mentors:
All corps members have the opportunity to receive a mentor during their City Year service and beyond

Work experience:
All corps members are encouraged to find work placements/internships to build their CV
?
What do we achieve for children and schools
88% renewal rate by headteachers and governors

Recognised in 10 Ofsted reports as contributing towards improving school standards

93% of teach said corps members always or often contributed to or improved pupils' positive behaviours

98% of parents said they were pleased that City Year was in their child's schools

Half the pupils we support were eligible for the pupil premium and half spoke English as an additional language

Average attendance of focus-list students rose from 92.8% in the first six weeks of 2013/14 to 94.4% in the last six weeks

81% of teachers said corps members always or often contributed to or improved pupils' attainment in numeracy, 85% said the same about attainment in literacy
What does City Year do to develop leadership/resilience in corps members?
Development of self-efficacy and agency is critical to sustaining corps members through their year of service.
Why? Because it's a challenge that requires a call on internal and external resources.
We look to develop a community of practice around education, a community of reflective practitioners and; importantly, through experiential learning, practice techniques that can be taken into school. For example the Emotional Intelligence 'Sharing Circle'
Understanding Parliament
The House of City Year FY16

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will:
Understand the importance of Parliament and how it operates in terms of governing the country
Understand the pressure an MP faces when they are required to vote
Understand different types of debate and voting processes
Understand why the government is the largest party
Experience what it means to get behind a leader and feel a part of a team fighting for an issue
Understand and experience the expected behaviour for taking part in a parliamentary debate
Understanding Parliament
The House of City Year FY16
Match the logos to the parties

Understanding Parliament
The House of City Year FY16
Left Wing vs Right Wing
Labour are a 'left wing' party, while the Conservatives are a 'right wing' party. The left and right are opposing beliefs on how the UK should run.
What Labour say:

Socialist party (public ownership of industries, redistribution of wealth, rights for workers, welfare state, publicly funded health and education). Fair society - not just for the most powerful/richest.

What their critics say:

Shouldn't punish the rich, government should do less, Labour not actually socialist!


What Conservatives say:

Give people more freedom, government should do less, pay less tax. Protect traditional values (family, church, British culture, & British sovereignty).

What their critics say:

Only care about the rich, give business too much power. Greed!



Understanding Parliament
The House of City Year FY16
What do Members of Parliament actually do?
An MP has a dual role.

A constituency role and a Westminster role

In the constituency they represent their constituents. They respond to community needs and issues. They're a figurehead. They are there for individuals to approach regarding particular issues. They host what are called surgeries on Fridays in their constituency.
An MP has a dual role.

A constituency role and a Westminster role

In their Westminster role they are there to be the voice of their constituents. They also have a party role to play which is to support their party's policy position and contribute to presenting a united front. They will also have personal interests e.g. Environment, Mental Health which can lead to them participating in All Party Parliamentary Groups and Select Committees. You have to be elected by your peers to be on a Select Committee so it's prestigious and a stepping stone.
Finally the government appoints Secretaries of State who are responsible for particular areas of public policy e.g Health, Education, Welfare etc.

The Secretary of State is responsible for the whole department. Nicky Morgan is the Secretary of State for what?

Ministers work under that Secretary of State supporting them in more specialised roles, it's similar to other management structures and hierarchies. It's akin to a school structure.

Understanding Parliament
The House of City Year FY16
An MP has a dual role.

A constituency role and a Westminster role

In the constituency they represent their constituents. They respond to community needs and issues. They're a figurehead. They are there for individuals to approach regarding particular issues. They host what are called surgeries on Fridays in their constituency.
An MP has a dual role.

A constituency role and a Westminster role

In their Westminster role they are there to be the voice of their constituents. They also have a party role to play which is to support their party's policy position and contribute to presenting a united front. They will also have personal interests e.g. Environment, Mental Health which can lead to them participating in All Party Parliamentary Groups and Select Committees. You have to be elected by your peers to be on a Select Committes so it's prestigious and a stepping stone.
Finally the government appoints Secretaries of State who are responsible for particular areas of public policy e.g Health, Education, Welfare etc.

The Secretary of State is responsible for the whole department. Nicky Morgan is the Secretary of State for what?

Ministers work under that Secretary of State supporting them in more specialised roles, it's similar to other management structures and hierarchies. It's akin to a school structure.
Parliamentary debates

Understanding Parliament
The House of City Year FY16
An MP has a dual role.

A constituency role and a Westminster role

In the constituency they represent their constituents. They respond to community needs and issues. They're a figurehead. They are there for individuals to approach regarding particular issues. They host what are called surgeries on Fridays in their constituency.
An MP has a dual role.

A constituency role and a Westminster role

In their Westminster role they are there to be the voice of their constituents. They also have a party role to play which is to support their party's policy position and contribute to presenting a united front. They will also have personal interests e.g. Environment, Mental Health which can lead to them participating in All Party Parliamentary Groups and Select Committees. You have to be elected by your peers to be on a Select Committes so it's prestigious and a stepping stone.
Finally the government appoints Secretaries of State who are responsible for particular areas of public policy e.g Health, Education, Welfare etc.

The Secretary of State is responsible for the whole department. Nicky Morgan is the Secretary of State for what?

Ministers work under that Secretary of State supporting them in more specialised roles, it's similar to other management structures and hierarchies. It's akin to a school structure.
The Speaker

Reducing the education inequality gap True or False?
1 in 7 children in the UK go to school without breakfast
There are currently 3.5 million children living in poverty in the UK. That's almost a third of all children
Over 55% of disadvantaged children are not school ready at age 5, meaning they are unable to read simple words, play well with other children and follow instructions compared to their peers.
Over the course of a lifetime, a graduate from a Russell Group university will earn on average £371,000 more than someone who left school with fewer than 5 good GCSE's
You must be the
change
you wish to see in the world - Gandhi
Power
and
Idealism
Those people who took non-violent action were idealistic in their belief that the world could be made better, as well as in their belief that they themselves could play a role in making that change happen
Who do I want to
Be
?
What do I need to
Know
?
What can I do to effect
Change
?
Spirit
, demonstration of enthusiasm, passion and energy
Discipline
, maintenance of self-control and directing your energy towards achieving a goal
Purpose
, focus on motivation, mission and goals
Pride
, demonstration of commitment, dignity, self-worth, and confidence in all you do
The Idealist's Journey
Your week, your month, your term, your
City Year
Door Code: 51258
Full transcript