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Volume and Pressure

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by

Cori Yancy

on 16 February 2016

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Transcript of Volume and Pressure

What happens when you have a change in pressure or volume ?
Volume and Pressure
What happens to volume of gas as pressure increases, etc ?
What is the mathematical connection between volume and pressure ?
What variable must be held constant for this law to be accurate ?
Pressure vs Volume Graph
Who studied the relationship between volume of a gas and its pressure ?
How do we use volume and pressure connections today ?
If the credited scientist has a published experiment that defied his work, describe the experiment and its feelings
Pressure increases
Volume decreases
Pressure decreases
Volume increases
When pressure goes up, volume goes down. When volume goes up, pressure goes down.
P1V1 = P2V2 = P3V3 etc.
The volume of a given amount of gas has to be held at constant temperature because it varies inversely with the applied pressure when the temperature and mass are constant.
Robert Boyle
Created the Boyle law, which states the volume of a given amount of gas held at constant temperature varies inversely with the applied pressure when the temperature and mass are constant.
Boyle studied what happened to the volume of the gas in the sealed end of the tube as he added mercury to the open end. Boyle noticed that the product of the pressure times the volume for any measurement in this table was equal to the product of the pressure times the volume for any other measurement, within experimental error.
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