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7 Steps

By Nadia Binda-Moir and Drew Forrest
by

Drew Forrest

on 30 September 2015

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Transcript of 7 Steps

7 Steps of Assessment
design by Dóri Sirály for Prezi
What do we want the students to learn?

What are the big ideas?

If students know what they are supposed to be learning they will have an easier time getting there.
Levelling - describe what does excellence looks like?

Show examples of excellent and limited understanding (and in-between levels if you have them).




1. Explain Purpose
When students set goals, they decide on something they need to work on and take steps toward achieving that goal.

Use self-assessments to guide their goal-setting.

Set short and long term goals alongside your students.


7. Communicate
2. Show Samples
What counts/matters/is important when we are:
solving a math problem
writing a lab report
responding to text
performing a piece of music
framing a garage

Have students examine samples of work and list important features.

Organize those features into a list of criteria.

Post so students can see.

Ask students to reflect afterward and complete the statement: "Next time I will...".
3. Set and Use Criteria
When students assess themselves, they develop insights into their own learning.

Ask students to check for understanding.

Look for proof of their learning.
4. Self-Assessment
5. Set Goals
Triangulation
- there are three general sources of assessment evidence:
1. Observations of learning.
2. Products students create.
3. Conversations - discussing learning with students (teacher-student or student-student).

Evidence needs to be collected from the
three different sources
over time.
Trends
and
patterns
become apparent. This increases
reliability
and
validity
.
6. Collect Evidence
1. Think about a unit of study in one of your courses.

2. Identify no more than three big ideas/understandings that are foundational to that unit.

3. Write them in this box.
Reliability: refers to students producing the same kind of result at different times. "Think 'repeatability' "
Validity: how well do the sources of evidence inform the desired outcome?

"Does this task suit the outcome?"
How will student achievement be communicated?

Student achievement should be communicated often, not just at reporting time.
1. Describe how will you distinguish between quality of work and demonstrating an understanding of the learning outcomes.

2. How will you develop a gradual release of responsibility, from "I do" to "we do" and finally "you do"?

1. Go back to the items you had listed here and think about the following:
a. Identify which tools will be "for" learning and "of" learning. How will you evaluate and record their understanding of the big idea(s).

b. How and where will you accumulate a balance of evidence which will include conversations, observations, and products? Be specific.

c. How will you record their understandings and reflect this in the grade book?
Students will explore and be able to articulate their own informed opinion on three of the following list of cultural aspects of the Hispanic world as found in selected short stories:

Immigration
Language barriers
Historical events
Love and marriage
Women in society
Political corruption
Spanish
Spanish
Journal entries of personal reactions
Peer assessment sheets
Observation of class discussions
Before and after log sheet on prior and post knowledge
1. Choose one of your big ideas/goals and identify what the students will be doing to reach that learning destination. List them in this box.
Criteria for geometric poster

1) Composition
2) Colour / Value / Source of light
3) Space (overlap, atmospheric, perspective)
4) Detail & Refinement
5) A Risk
Students will explore and be able to articulate their own informed opinion on three of the following list of cultural aspects of the Hispanic world as found in selected short stories:

Immigration
Language barriers
Historical events
Love and marriage
Women in society
Political corruption
1) Composition
2) Colour / Value / Source of light
3) Space (overlap, atmospheric, perspective)
4) Detail & Refinement
5) A Risk
1) Composition
2) Colour / Value / Source of light
3) Space (overlap, atmospheric, perspective)
4) Detail & Refinement
5) A Risk
1) Composition
2) Colour / Value / Source of light
3) Space (overlap, atmospheric, perspective)
4) Detail & Refinement
5) A Risk
1) Composition
2) Colour / Value / Source of light
3) Space (overlap, atmospheric, perspective)
4) Detail & Refinement
5) A Risk
What criteria is important when making a graph?
Bloom's Match-Up

1. Place the verbs from the handout into the appropriate level of Bloom's Taxonomy.

2. Next to each level, list a couple of activities, related to your unit of study, that would align with each level of understanding in Bloom's Taxonomy.

*handout

3. Now think about the outcome/big idea. Are you wanting lower level Blooms understanding or upper level? Do your assignments help you assess this or do you need to change what you're asking them to do?

Which Graph is Better?
Which Graph is Better?
Full transcript