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Russian Feudalism

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diana lopez

on 26 November 2012

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Transcript of Russian Feudalism

Russian Feudalism What is Feudalism? -Feudalism socioeconomic system in which land is granted to Nobles who then house serfs and peasants alike, who provide services in exchange for their housing. The Hierarchy -Nobles, and Elites
-Peasants (Trades people, urban population)
-Serfs (owned people) The Nobles -The tops rank in the Russian Elite system are the Duma Ranks (Council to the Tzar)
-Boyars
(highest title, second to the ruling prince or Tsar)
-Okolnichii (junior boyars)
-Duma gentleman
-Duma Secretary
-Provincial gentry (military) What Kept Feudalism in Russia So Long? -The surfs were the largest component of the economic system. -Feudalism in Russian Begin in the tenth century - The dependency created by both groups for one another. -Feudalism ended in Russian in 1861 with the act of emancipation passed under Tzar Alexander II. The Peasants -Over half of the Russian peasantry was in serfdom by the mid-seventeenth century. Bibliography Marc Bloch, Feudal Society (Chicago: Chicago UP, 1964), 145-158. -Half of the free peasantry was also non-Russian. -To remain free they paid a tax called a yasak -Many laws kept serfs landlocked without much mobility -Notion that one man is created more dear than another Marc Bloch, Feudal Society (Chicago: Chicago UP, 1964), 145-158. Paul Bushkovitch, "Russia" Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World 5 (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 2004: 273-275 Paul Bushkovitch, "Russia" Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World 5 (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 2004: 273-275 Bushkovitch, Paul "Russia" Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World 5 (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 2004) :275. Paul Bushkovitch, "Russia" Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World 5 (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 2004: 273-275 Paul Bushkovitch, "Russia" Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World 5 (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 2004: 274-275
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