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Roper vs. Simmons Supreme Court Case

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by

Jonathan Sanchez

on 12 February 2013

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Transcript of Roper vs. Simmons Supreme Court Case

Presented by Jonathan Sanchez Roper v. Simmons Case Briefing
Court Journey
Amendment discussed
Precedent cases
Clash of Values
Supreme Court Holding
Majority opinion
Dissenting Opinion
Essential Question
Enduring understanding Briefing of The Case Petitioner: Donald Roper
Respondent: Christopher Simmons Amendment in Question Eighth Amendment: Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted Questions Considered by the Court Court Procedure Simmons was taken to a Missouri trial court and was sentenced to death. Simmons appealed Precedent Case Atkins vs Virginia- Court's Decision Majority Presentation Overview Facts of the Case At the age of Seventeen Christopher Simmons and two of his friends committed premeditated murder. He was taken to court and easily found to be guilty of the crime he admitted to the crime on video and performed a reenactment of the murder. He was sentenced to death by lethal injection. Simmons appealed this decision arguing that it was unconstitutional to sentence him to death since the crime was committed when he was seventeen. Is a minor mature enough to be considered fully culpable for their actions? Is sentencing a minor to death considered a Cruel and Unusual Punishment? Simmons was taken to the Missouri Supreme Court
Decision: Roper 1997
U.S Supreme Court denies Certiorari 2001
Supreme Court Once again denies Certiorari 2003
Missouri Supreme Court
Decision: Simmons 2004
Supreme Court grants review "Daryl Renard Atkins was convicted of abduction, armed robbery, and capital murder. In the penalty phase of Atkins' trial, the defense relied on one witness, a forensic psychologist, who testified that Atkins was mildly mentally retarded. The jury sentenced Atkins to death, but the Virginia Supreme Court ordered a second sentencing hearing because the trial court had used a misleading verdict form. During resentencing the same forensic psychologist testified, but this time the State rebutted Atkins' intelligence. The jury again sentenced Atkins to death. In affirming, the Virginia Supreme Court relied on Penry v. Lynaugh, in rejecting Atkins' contention that he could not be sentenced to death because he is mentally retarded" (Oyez). Dissenting 5-4 in favor of Simmons "When a juvenile offender commits a heinous crime, the State can exact forfeiture of some of the most basic liberties, but the State cannot extinguish his life and his potential to attain a mature understanding of his own humanity" (Kennedy). The Court reaches this implausible result by purporting to advert, not to the original meaning of the Eighth Amendment, but to "the evolving standards of decency," ante, at 6, of our national society" (Scalia). Literature Cited

"Roper v. Simmons | The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law." The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law | A Multimedia Archive of the Supreme Court of the United States. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://www.oyez.org/cases/2000-2009/2004/2004_03_633/#sort=vote>.

"Bill of Rights and Later Amendments." ushistory.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://www.ushistory.org/documents/amendments.htm#amend08>.

of, the afternoon. "Roper v Simmons (2005)." UMKC School of Law. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Nov. 2012. <http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/conlaw/RopervSimmons.html>.

"ROPER V. SIMMONS." LII | LII / Legal Information Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Nov. 2012. <http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/03-633.ZS.html>.

Supreme Court Case Studies: By Topic | www.streetlaw.org." Home | www.streetlaw.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Nov. 2012. <http://www.streetlaw.org/en/Page/41/Supreme_Court_Case_Studies_By_Topic

Gonzales, Veronica. Email. 04 December 2012

"Atkins v. Virginia | The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law." The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law | A Multimedia Archive of the Supreme Court of the United States. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012. <http://www.oyez.org/cases/2000-2009/2001/2001_00_8452/>.

"U. S. Supreme Court: Roper v. Simmons, No. 03-633 | Death Penalty Information Center." Death Penalty Information Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012. <http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/u-s-supreme-court-roper-v-simmons-no-03-633>.
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