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Nuclear Energy

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by

Owen Phillips

on 5 May 2014

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Transcript of Nuclear Energy

Equipment Needed
Reactor
Steam Turbines
Fuel Rods
Control Rods
Control Systems
Pipes & Valves
Water Cooling System
By: Owen Phillips

Date: May 5, 2014
Advantages
Does not require a lot of space.
It does not have carbon emissions
It dos not produce smoke particles
It is the most concentrated form of energy
It is reliable
What Is Energy?
What Is Nuclear Energy?
Nuclear energy is the energy released by reactions within atomic nuclei, that is nuclear fission or fusion. Nuclear power can be used to generate heat and electricity. Applications of nuclear energy including nuclear power, nuclear medicine, and nuclear weapons.
Nuclear Energy
Different Forms of Energy

How Nuclear Energy Works
Nuclear Energy
Energy is power derived from the utilization of physical or chemical resources, especially to provide light and heat or to work machines.
A nuclear fueled power plant is much like a fossil fuel power plant. Water is turned into steam which in turn drives turbine generators. The difference is heat. In nuclear power plants, the heat to create steam is caused when uranium atoms split. That's called fission. There is no combustion in a nuclear reactor.
Disadvantages
Disposal of nuclear waste
Decommissioning
Nuclear accidents
Meltdown
Costs a lot of money
Groups that Support Nuclear Energy
World Nuclear Association (WNA)
Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI)
Energy in the U.S.
Energy in NC
Thermal: Energy of moving particles.
Mechanical Energy : The energy of moving objects.
Electrical Energy: Energy of moving electric charges.
Chemical Energy: Energy stored in the bonds that hold atoms together in molecules.
Electromagnetic Energy: Energy that travels as waves.
Nuclear Energy: Energy stored in the nucleus of an atom.
Citations!
Types of Energy. (2008, January 1). Types of Energy. Retrieved April 25, 2014, from http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/types_of_energy/4568
Nuclear Power: Advantages and Disadvantages. (2013, January 1). Nuclear Power: Advantages and Disadvantages. Retrieved April 24, 2014, from http://www.cyberphysics.co.uk/topics/nuclear/advantages_disadvantages_nuclear_power.htm
Fagleman, L. (2010, November 25). What Special Equipment is Required for Nuclear Power?. eHow. Retrieved April 24, 2014, from http://www.ehow.com/facts_7556356_special-equipment-required-nuclear-power.html
Brain, M., & Lamb, R. (2000, October 9). How Nuclear Power Works. HowStuffWorks. Retrieved April 25, 2014, from http://science.howstuffworks.com/nuclear-power.htm
History about Nuclear Energy
Physicist Enrico Fermi discovered the potential of nuclear fission in 1934.
Nuclear power plants starting getting popular in the 1950's and 1960's. It was considered cleaner than current practices.
March 28, 1979, Three Mile Island reactor in PA, overheated due to a bad coolant line. Though no one was injured, it showed people the dangers of nuclear energy.
U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis. (2014, April 17). North Carolina. Retrieved May 2, 2014, from http://www.eia.gov/state/data.cfm?sid=NC
U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis. (2014, April 17). North Carolina. Retrieved May 2, 2014, from http://www.eia.gov/state/data.cfm?sid=NC
. (2014, January 1). . Retrieved May 2, 2014, from http://www.nnr.co.za/what-is-nuclear-energy/
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