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Woman's Right

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maya gorski

on 25 April 2013

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Transcript of Woman's Right

Susan B. Anthony Susan B. Anthony Susan B. Anthony by Proma & Maya Quotes "Oh, if I could but live another century and see the fruition of all the work for women! There is so much yet to be done." "To think I have had more than 60 years of hard struggle for a little liberty, and then to die without it seems so cruel." Until the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution became law in 1920, American women were not allowed to vote. Susan B. Anthony's 50-year fight for women's suffrage, or the right to vote, made this amendment possible.
Like her parents, she believed that men and women should be treated equally. In 1851, Anthony began working with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, another suffragette. Their first success was the passage of a law in 1860 in New York that gave women the right to own property and to keep their children if they divorced.
Anthony also fought for the abolition, or end, of slavery and for the right of former slaves to vote.After the Civil War, she was disappointed when former slaves were given that right, but women were not. As a result, she formed suffrage associations and lectured all over the world. She saw women get the right to vote in other countries, but not in the United States. But she remained hopeful, and a month before her death in 1906, Anthony said that "failure is impossible." She was right. Fourteen years after Anthony's death, the 19th Amendment became law, and people called it the "Anthony Amendment." http://www.biography.com/people/susan-b-anthony-194905
http://www.nps.gov/wori/historyculture/susan-b-anthony.htm
http://www.shmoop.com/womens-movements/photo-women-protest.html Our sources Meeting Elizabeth Cady Stanton Anthony’s experience with the teacher’s union, temperance and antislavery reforms, and Quaker upbringing, laid fertile ground for a career in women’s rights reform to grow. The career would begin with an introduction to Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
On a street corner in Seneca Falls in 1851, Amelia Bloomer introduced Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and later Stanton recalled the moment: “There she stood with her good earnest face and genial smile, dressed in gray silk, hat and all the same color, relieved with pale blue ribbons, the perfection of neatness and sobriety. I liked her thoroughly, and why I did not at once invite her home with me to dinner, I do not know. Stanton was born on Nov. 12, 1815, in Johnstown, New York, and graduated from the Troy Female Seminary.
Meeting Elizabeth Cady Stanton was probably the beginning of her interest in women’s rights, but it is Lucy Stone’s speech at the 1852 Syracuse Convention that is credited for convincing Anthony to join the women’s rights movement Elizabeth Cady Stanton <http://www.findingdulcinea.com/news/on-this-day/July-August-08/On-this-Day--19th-Amendment-Gives-Women-Right-to-Vote.html>. Pictures Fighting for Rights Born Susan Brownell Anthony on February 15, 1820, in Adams, Massachusetts, Susan B. Anthony grew up in a Quaker family. She developed a strong moral compass early on, and spent much of her life working on social causes. Anthony was the second oldest of eight children to a local cotton mill owner and his wife. The family moved to Battenville, New York, in 1826. Around this time, Anthony was sent to study at a Quaker school near Philadelphia. Early Life Woman at
Protest Woman at Protest Death Even in her later years, Anthony never gave up on her fight for women's suffrage. In 1905, she met with President Theodore Roosevelt in Washington, D.C., to lobby for an amendment to give women the right to vote. Anthony died the following year, on March 13, 1906, at the age of 86, at her home in Rochester, New York. According to her obituary in The New York Times, shortly before her death, Anthony told friend Anna Shaw, "To think I have had more than 60 years of hard struggle for a little liberty, and then to die without it seems so cruel."

It wouldn't be until 14 years after Anthony's death—in 1920—that the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, giving all adult women the right to vote, was passed. In recognition of her dedication and hard work, the U.S. Treasury Department put Anthony's portrait on dollar coins in 1979, making her the first woman to be so honored. Susan B. Anthony Annotated bibliography's "Susan B. Anthony Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2013.We used this website to get a picture of Susan B. Anthony we also got info on her early life, her death and quotes. More, Men For Women's Rights In 1848 Frederick Douglass and Many More Men Came in Support of Equality Read. National Parks Service. National Parks Service, 06 Apr. 2013. Web. 22 Apr. 2013.We used this website for info on how Susan B. Anthony met Elizabeth Cady Stanton. "Women's Movements Photo: Women Protest." Shmoop. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2013.We used this website for pictures of woman in protest.It was a also a nice pictures. "On This Day: 19th Amendment Gives Women Right to Vote." On This Day: 19th Amendment Gives Women Right to Vote. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2013.We used this to get a picture of Susan B. Anthony and her friends at protest. "Reconstruction Photo: Susan B. Anthony." Shmoop. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2013.We used this website to get a picture of Susan B. Anthony. http://www.biography.com/people/elizabeth-cady-stanton-9492182 "Elizabeth Cady Stanton Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2013.We used this website for a picture of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.That picture was used in the slide where we have pictures of protest. http://www.worldbookonline.com/student/article?id=ar529440&st=susan+b+anthony&sc=0#top "World Book Online Reference Center | Online Reference Book| Online Encyclopedia." World Book. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2013.We used this to get info on Elizabeth Cady Stanton.This is our encyclopedia source.
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