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Copy of AP ENGLISH

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Michelle Aiken

on 16 April 2013

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Transcript of Copy of AP ENGLISH

Important Vocabulary conveying a reality that is opposite to appearance or expectation to form an opinion about something that is based on present knowledge an idea, subject or pattern that is frequently repeated in a piece of literature Irony Infer Motif Satire literary mode based on criticism of people and society through ridicule using scournful mocking and exaggerations Concrete Diction language that describes qualities that can be perceived with the five senses Abstract Ex: The firehouse burst into flames. Ex: The ground was wet when I woke up this morning. Ex: South Park Ex: In Shakespeare's plays, mistaken identity and the fall of the mighty occur with great regularity. thought of apart from concrete realities Ex: calling a friend's company "pleasant" Ex: The apple is red. Parallel Syntax repetition of similar sentence structures Ex: The star is radiant, bright, and shining. Simile a comparison between two different things using "like" or "as" Ex: The sun is like a ball of flames. Understatement a figure of speech that makes a weaker statement than situation seems to call for Ex: George W. Bush made a few minor errors of judgment as President. Onomatopoeia a word that imitates the sources of the sound that it describes Ex: The cow is mooing. Style manner of expression; how a speaker/writer says what he says Allusive having reference to something implied or inferred Ex: gothic, scientific, ornate Disjointed disconnected; incoherent Effusive lacking reserve; overflowing, pouring out Pedantic an adjective that describes words, phrases, or general tone that is overly scholarly, academic, or bookish Ex: The student annoyed his friends by constantly lecturing them about every subject imaginable, clearly assuming he was better informed than they. Ex: making references to Shakespeare's plays Symbolic serving as a representation of something else Ex: A dove is a symbol of peace. Multiple
Choice ... small
Choice A is the correct answer: is committed to developing his skills as a writer
He speaks a lot about writing; regardless of the topic, he always manages to tie it back to the art of writing. Also, he speaks admirably about how the other professions pursue their goals. He learns his techniques through watching others. He always strives to improve his skills. Question #11: The speaker in the passage can best be described as a person who... Question #12: That the speaker "sympathized with" the drunk's "obsession" (lines 16-17) is ironic chiefly because the drunk... Choice E is the correct answer. He mentions that he too “hungered and thirsted for quiet”, just like the drunkard who commanded all to “Shut up”. However, this is ironic because the noise of the noise of the drunkard is part of the “chaos of sound” that creates the authors writer’s block. Question #13: It can be inferred that the speaker and the drunk were "fellow victims" (line 22) in that... Choice E is correct because the speaker and the drunk were “fellow victims” to the “chaos of sound”. The writer longs for quiet to write, just as the drunkard longed for silence and commanded the world to “shut up”. Question #14: In context, the word "intimate" (lines 24-25) is best interpreted to mean... Choice C is correct as the word “intimate” is best interpreted to mean inexorably penetrating. This can be defend using context clues. Following the word intimate, the author describes the source of noise as “one that got beneath the skin and worked into the very structure of the consciousness”. Question #15: The speaker mentions Beethoven's Fifth and Macbeth (lines 27-28) as examples of which of the following? Choice D is correct. When the author mentions the artistic compositions, he cites specific parts of each compositions that aroused his more involved feelings and helped him write. Question #16: The desription of the "delicate balance" (line 41) achieved at jazz jam sessions contributes to the unity of the passage in which of the following ways? Choice A is correct because the passage describes the chaotic nature of the authors neighborhood and the chaotic sounds that it creates to distract him. When he mentions the “delicate balance” achieved at the jazz jam sessions, it directly contrasts with the purpose of the article and the situation in the neighborhood. Question #17: According to the speaker, jazz musicians that he knew as a boy attempted to do all of the following except... Choice B is correct is because it is stated in the passage that the jazz musicians attempted to do the things listed in choices A,C, D, E. However, the only musician that attempted anything having to do with slaves songs was the singer who lived next to the author. Question #18: The speaker's attitude toward the jazz musicians is best described as one of... Choice B is correct is because it is stated in the passage that the jazz musicians attempted to do the things listed in choices A,C, D, E. However, the only musician that attempted anything having to do with slaves songs was the singer who lived next to the author. Question #19: The speaker suggests that the jazz musicians to whom he refers accomplish which of the following by means of their art? Choice D is correct. In the passage it states that “life could be harsh, loud, and wrong if it wished, but [the jazz musicians] lived it fully, and when they expressed their attitude toward the world it was with a fluid style that reduced the chaos of living to form”. Question #20: In the sentence beginning "There were times" (lines 58-63), the speaker employs all of the following except... Choice D is correct. In the passage it states that “life could be harsh, loud, and wrong if it wished, but [the jazz musicians] lived it fully, and when they expressed their attitude toward the world it was with a fluid style that reduced the chaos of living to form”. Question #21: In the passage, the drunk, the jazz musicians, and the singer all share which of the following... Choice D is correct. In the passage it states that “life could be harsh, loud, and wrong if it wished, but [the jazz musicians] lived it fully, and when they expressed their attitude toward the world it was with a fluid style that reduced the chaos of living to form”. Question #22: The style of the passage as a whole is most accurately characterized as... Choice D is correct. In the passage it states that “life could be harsh, loud, and wrong if it wished, but [the jazz musicians] lived it fully, and when they expressed their attitude toward the world it was with a fluid style that reduced the chaos of living to form”. Cracking the AP exam ... small Here are
some tips! Read the question thoroughly
to see what the question is really asking. Attempt to predict the answer of the question without knowing the choices. Read through the possible answers and look for one similar to your prediction Use context clues to help answer the question Eliminate answers that do not make any sense. When stuck between two choices, do not second guess yourself. If you have to make excuses for why an answer is “technically” correct, it is probably wrong. Ex: Mike likes the color red, so he probably also likes to eat strawberries. Ex: an effusive greeting - filled with excitement and unrestrained gratitude
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