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Comma Rules

Objective: I WILL USE COMMAS CORRECTLY IN GIVEN SITUATIONS.
by

Britney Ciolek

on 13 November 2015

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Transcript of Comma Rules

Comma Rules
Rule 1
Use a comma to set off a noun of direct address (a person spoken to).
Rule 2
Use a comma to set off introductory words.
Rule 3
Use a comma to set off interrupters in a sentence.
Rule 4
Use a comma after the greeting of a friendly letter.
Rule 5
Use a comma after the closing of any letter.
Rule 6
Use a comma to set off words or phrases in a series.
Rule 7
Use a comma to clarify (make clear) a sentence.
Rule 8
Use a comma between two or more descriptive adjectives.
Time to Practice
Double Check your partner
Examples:
Louise, come here, please.
Have you gone, Michael?
I want to go, Roy, with your group.
Examples:
No, I haven't seen it.
Well, I've changed my mind.
Yes, the chimes are new.
Interrupters
An interrupter is a word, phrase, or clause that significantly breaks the flow of a sentence
Examples:
Dear Karla,
My dearest friend,
Examples:
Sincerely yours,
Love,
Examples:
Furniture, linens, toys, and dishes were sold there.
We ran a mile, swam a half mile, and biked a mile.
Examples:
In the night time was extremely important.
In the night, time was extremely important.
Example:
Bright, sparkling stars twinkled in the dark night.
1) Yes we will take route 91 to the caverns.
2) The turkeys ducks and chickens have not been fed.
3) His entire outlook it seemed had changed.
1) Yes, we will take route 91 to the caverns.
Rule 2
2) The turkeys, ducks, and chickens have not been fed. Rule 6
3) His entire outlook, it seemed, had changed. Rule 3
Examples:
The answer, I think, is fifty-four.
This calendar is, in fact, an old one.
However, not all is lost.
Rule 9
Use a comma to set off an appositive from the rest of the sentence.
Examples:
Ms. Reno, the bank president, spoke about loans.
We invited Tracy, our best friend, to dinner.
Rule 10
Use a comma between a city and state or country.
Example:
Miami, Florida or London, England
Use a comma to separate the parts of an address
Bill lives at 567 West Lowe Drive, Tulsa, Oklahoma.
If the city and state or country appear in a sentence, also place a comma after the state or country.
Dallas, Texas, is a growing city.
Rule 11
Use a comma after a month and year or day and year in a date.
February, 1980 or Jan. 1, 1900
Use a comma after the day of the week if the day appears with the date.
Monday, August 3 or Friday, Nov. 7, 1999
If the month and year, or day and year, appear in a sentence, also place a comma after the year.
On June 22, 1898, her grandparents were married.
Rule 12
Use a comma at the end of most direct quotations.
"I would like a hamburger," Kimi said.
If the person who is making the statment is given first, place a comma after the person's name + the verb that follows it.
Kimi said, "I would like a hamburger."
Practice Time
1) Houston Texas is one of the fastest growing cities in America.
2) Miss Ish my kitten has gone to sleep.
3) "I don't have any " replied Mother.
1) Houston, Texas, is one of the fastest growing cities in America. Rule 10
2) Miss Ish, my kitten, has gone to sleep. Rule 9
3) "I don't have any, " replied Mother. Rule 12
Check your answers...
Rule 13
Use a comma to set off a title following a name.
Example:
Gloria Kole, D.D.S., is opening a new office.
Linn Holter, R.N., works at Friedland Hospital.
Rule 14
Use a comma to invert a name.
Example:
His name appeared alphabetically as Clinton, Bill.
Rule 15
Use a comma after a dependent clause at the beginning of a sentence.
Example:
After we ate lunch, we went to a movie.
If the dependent clause is at the end of a sentence, no comma is needed.
Example:
We went to a movie after we ate lunch.
Rule 16
Use a comma before the conjunction that joins two independent clauses (compound sentence).
Example:
Dad cooked dinner, and I set the table.
Rule 17
Use a comma after two introductory prepositional phrases or after a long prepositional phrase when a subject follows it.
Examples:
In the middle of the night, Frank boarded a plane for Japan.
During the long intermission, everyone chatted.
Rule 18
Use a comma after an introductory participial phrase.
Examples:
Jumping on the bed, the toddler giggled with delight.
Torn into shreds, the red handkerchief hung limply from the bush.
Rule 19
Use a comma to set off adjectives in apposition.
Examples:
Bright and shiny, the gem sparkled in the light.
The gem, bright and shiny, sparkled in the light.
Apposition
Apposition is a grammatical construction in which two elements, normally noun phrases, are placed side by side, with one element serving to define or modify the other.
Let's try a few...
1) Her name appeared on the list as Martin Cynthia.
2) When you finish with that letter do you want to play chess?
3) His cheeks red and glowing appeared very swollen.
4) After the long drought during the summer rain fell steadily for four days.
Check..
1) Her name appeared on the list as Martin, Cynthia.
Rule 14
2) When you finish with that letter, do you want to play chess? Rule15
3) His cheeks, red and glowing, appeared very swollen.
Rule 19
4) After the long drought during the summer, rain fell steadily for four days. Rule 17
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