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Literary Devices in Rime of the Ancient Mariner

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Kasey Pham

on 30 October 2013

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Transcript of Literary Devices in Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Alliteration
Internal Rhyme
Literary Devices in Rime of the Ancient Mariner
When words used in succession begin with the same sound, creating a repetition of similar sounds in the sentence.
Why is it used?
To create
emphasis
rhythm
mood
Consonance in "Rime"
"The thi
ck
bla
ck

cl
oud was
cl
eft, and still
The Moon was at its side:
Like waters shot from some high crag,
The lightning fell with never a jag,
A river steep and wide."
Assonance
Consonance
The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics defines assonance as the repetition of the sound of a vowel or diphthong in nonrhyming stressed syllables near enough to each other for the echo to be discernible.
Merriam-Webster defines consonance as recurrence or repetition of consonants especially at the end of stressed syllables without the similar correspondence of vowels.
Examples:
-"that d
o
lphin-t
o
rn, that g
o
ng-t
o
rmented sea" (William Butler Yeats)
-"Ps
y
chic sp
i
es from Ch
i
na tr
y
to steal your m
i
nd's elation" (Red Hot Chili Peppers)
-"Fl
ee
t f
ee
t sw
ee
p by sp
ee
ding g
ee
se"

Rhyme between a word within a line and another word either at the end of the same line or within another line
Examples
"The flu
sh
ed bru
sh

sh
ifted in a fla
sh
"
"
S
ilken
s
ad un
c
ertain ru
s
tling" (Poe)
"Shor
t
and swee
t
the
t
ime was hi
t
"
Ex: Mary, Mary, quite contrary
Resulting Effect
Come all
y
e
y
oung fellows that follows the sea
To me, way hey, blow the man down
Now
p
lease
p
ay attention and listen to me
Give me some time to blow the man down
"Blow the Man Down" - Traditional Sea Shanty
Drum-like beat intensifies and emphasizes stanzas to relay importance
What does consonance do?

-Affects the flow of the poem
-Creates links between words with similar sounds
-Adds an auditory appeal to the verse
(Similar reasons as assonance - the only major difference is whether the repeated sounds are vowels or consonants.)
Transforms simplistic events to complex ideas in order to incite thought
Repeated sounds create rhythm.
Rocking like a boat.
Characteristics in Rime
What does assonance do?

-Affects the flow of the poem
-Creates links between words with similar sounds
-Adds an auditory appeal to the verse
Coleridge employs internal rhyme to transform glossed over information into attention grabbing details.
Assonance in "Rime"
Thematic Impact
"The harbour-bay was clear as glass,/So sm
oo
thly it was str
ew
n!/And on the b
ay
the m
oo
nlight l
ay
..."
The first stanza outlines the introduction of individual enlightenment in nature, eg. leaving behind comforts of home and land to learn more about self through nature
The smooth and sweet sounding "oo"s create a placid tone and soften the mood to fit the environment in the poem and suggests the emotional trauma of the storm is over.
The repetition of the harsh 'k' sound evokes a threatening landscape paralleled by the imagery of this stanza, helping create an ominous tone.
"The Ship was ch
ee
red, the harbour cl
ea
red,
Merrily did we drop
Below the kirk, below the hill,
Below the light-house top."
ooooo
ooo
"The fair breeze blew, the white
f
oam
f
lew
The
f
urrow
f
ollowed
f
ree,
We were the
f
irst that ever burst
Into that silent sea"
The wind blew the sea foam,
The sail moved
We felt like the first to sail
In that sea
Another example
"Like
o
ne that
o
n a l
o
nes
o
me r
oa
d/D
o
th w
a
lk in fear and dread,/ And having
o
nce turned r
ou
nd walks
o
n,/And turns n
o
m
o
re his head"
ooooo
"sloooowly"
"ahhhh"
The second stanza emulates thematic focus on power of nature above man
Beat expresses continuous, enduring natural world's control over humanity, eg. boat propelled by sea
"
Fo
rwith this
fr
ame of mine was wrenched
With a woeful agony
Which
fo
rced me to begin my tale;
And then it left me
fr
ee."
Tempo emphasizes importance of simplistic every day occurrences, eg. wind
"ccckkk!"
"bla
ck
"
"cckckck!"
Again, Coleridge uses multiple devices in tandem, adding alliteration in "furrow followed free."
"F" sound emphasizes the important inflections in the stanza.
Aides the rhythm
Harsh sound, forced to contort the lips to make it
Harsh mood of the situation
Final "free" uses "F" differently: quick, happy feeling of being "free."
Nature's supernatural power over Mariner
Notice, Coleridge employs another device to heighten the affects of his language. Assonance appears in the long e sound repeated in cheered and cleared.
Bringing it all together...
Tick!
-----
-----
-----
"
Sw
i
f
t
l
y,
sw
i
f
t
l
y
f
l
ew the
sh
i
p,
Yet
sh
e
s
ailed
s
o
f
t
l
y too:
Sw
eet
l
y
sw
eet
l
y b
l
ew the breeze -
On me alone it b
l
ew."
(Christopher Aquino)
Alliteration, assonance and consonance all work together to enhance the poem's flow and rhythm.
Alliteration usually used for humor
ex: Peter Piper Picked a Peck of Pickled Peppers
Coleridge: emphasize the power of nature
Sea shanties:
(from French "chanter:" to sing)
songs originally sung by sailors using rhythmic patterns that served as accompaniment to work.
After cheering on our ship, everyone left, we began to sail away
Beyond the familiar church and the lighthouse on land
As Kasey and Emily explained - the 'sw', 'sh' and 's' sounds are all 'soft' - and the repetition of these sounds emphasizes the ease of travel.
sw
i
sh!
sh
lop
b
llll
ewww
-The consonance created by the repeated 'f' and 'l' sounds creates soft wording that reminds readers the ship is in safe waters.

-The soft sounds are interspersed by the assonance of the 'i' sounds, interrupting the flow but in a short and quick manner, like small waves in calm seas.

-The assonance of the 'i' and 'ee' sounds also captures the quickness of the poem. This allows the reader to better feel the mood of the poem.
How much alliteration can you spot??
Sailing Ship
Ivan Aivazovsky
Disney uses it in its movie "2000 Leagues Under the Sea" when Ned Land sings a sea shanty about his past lovers.
"
Sw
i
f
t
l
y,
sw
i
f
t
l
y
f
l
ew the
sh
i
p,
Yet
sh
e
s
ai
l
ed
s
o
f
t
l
y too:
Sw
eet
l
y
sw
eet
l
y b
l
ew the breeze -
On me alone it b
l
ew."
Shout out to internal rhyme with 'b
ay
' and 'l
ay
' slowing the poem down as well
"With slo
p
ing masts and di
pp
ing
p
row,
As who
p
ursued with yell and blow
Still treads the shadow of his foe."
Consonance
Harsh '
p
' sound increases the drama of the storm blast.
Places an emphasis on key words
Do ya hear it?
"
Swiftly
,
swiftly
flew the
ship
,
Yet she
sailed

softly
too:

Sweetly
,
sweetly
,
blew
the
breeze
-
On me alone it
blew
."
"S": sound of wind
"Sw": swooping sound
Hurried pace and a gentle wind
Contrast Nature's power and gentleness
A Packet Boat under Sail in a Breeze Off the South Foreland
Thomas Luny
"L" emphasizes each important word
LIFE-IN-DEATH
"W" provides rhythmic transition
Consonant "L" is long and drawn out -- mood
LIFE-IN-DEATH draws out Mariner's life
Awe of Nature's simultaneous beauty and destruction
"Her
l
ips
w
ere red, her
l
ooks
w
ere free,
Her
l
ocks
w
ere yellow as gold:
Her skin
w
as as
w
hite as
l
eprosy,
The Night-Mare
L
IFE-IN-DEATH
w
as she"
Putting it All Together
To Control Rhythm
To Create Mood
"Till noon we quietly sailed on,
Yet never a
b
reeze did
b
reathe:
S
lowly and
s
moothly went the ship,
Moved onward from
b
eneath"
"B" sounds are emphasized
Supernatural qualities of nature
"S" sounds must be drawn out slowly, regulating pace
"As soon I heard a roaring wind:
It did not come anear;
But with its
s
ound it
sh
ook the
s
ails,
That were so thin and sere."
"S" sandwiches "sh", making the latter stand out
"Shook" is the important word to place emphasis on
Power of the wind
"
D
ay after
d
ay,
d
ay after
d
ay,
We stuck, nor breath nor motion,
As idle as a painted ship
Upon a painted ocean."
Repeated "d" sounds heavier and heavier
Plodding mood
Mariner subject to Nature's punishment
The l
o
nger v
o
wel s
ou
nds (
"uh" "ah" "oh"
) dr
a
w
ou
t h
o
w sl
o
w the ship moves, embellishing the loneliness of the mariner and creating a sullen tone. The slower pace is soon contrasted with the swift winds that come.
"And the coming wind did roar more loud,
And the
s
ails did
s
igh like
s
edge;
And the rain poured down from one black cloud;
The Moon was at its edge."
"S"'s make literal sighing sounds
Imagery through sound evoked
Awe for greater forces
Full transcript