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Mini Unit: SLAVERY

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Paul Schneider

on 12 February 2014

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Transcript of Mini Unit: SLAVERY

Unit 7: Slavery
Day 1 - What is Slavery?
Day 2 - Plantation Life
Day 3 - The Uprising: Nat Turner
Day 4 - Free Slaves
12 Years A Slave
In the Americas, Europeans first used Native Americans to work farms and mines. When the native peoples began dying from disease, the Europeans brought in Africans.

The buying and selling of Africans for work in the Americas became known as the Triangle Trade. From 1500 to 1870, when the slave trade in the Americans finally ended, about 9.5 million Africans had been imported as slaves. The Spanish first began the practice of bringing Africans to the Americas. However, the Portuguese increased the demand for slaves. They were looking for workers for their economiendas (plantations) in South America.

Other European colonies also brought slaves to work on sugarcane, cotton, and tobacco plantations. About 400,000 slaves were brought to the English colonies in North America. Their population increased to about 2 million by 1830. Many African rulers joined in the slave trade. They captured people inland and brought them to the coast to sell to European traders. The Europeans then brought the slaves to the Americas to work on plantations.
Bellwork
T-Notes
American Slavery
Modern Slavery
Slavery in America
Triangle Trade
Slaves had
no rights
and were
treated as property
.
Children
were born into
slavery
.
Slaves were
not allowed
to
attend school.
Worked
in
plantations
. As well as fields, houses, and industries.
Majority
lived
in
the
South
.

Interesting Fact:
Fully 3/4 of Southern whites did not even own slaves; of those who did, 88% owned twenty or fewer.
Modern Slavery
Read
the
article
about
Modern Slavery
you picked up as you walked in.

Fill in your t-chart
for Modern Slavery as you read with your partner. Include
definitions, descriptions,
and
interesting things
.
Include
facts
that
describe
each and
interesting
things about each category.
If you
finish early
, answer the
questions
at the bottom of the page in
complete sentences
in your
journal.
1) Label the three continents involved in the Triangular Trade.
2) Draw arrows showing the direction of the trade.
3) On the map list one thing that was sent from each continent.
GOODS
Slaves
Rum
Textiles
Sugar
Tobacco
February 5
Complete Making History Rubric
Turn in the exit tray on your way out!
History Minutes
In at least
5 complete sentences

Compare and contrast:
How are modern slavery and slavery in antebellum America similar or different.
Modern Slavery and slavery in America pre-Civil are....

Modern Slavery....

While American slavery...

Both modern slavery and antebellum slavery in America....
USE YOUR NOTES!!!
In 3-5 sentences describe the beginnings of slavery in the Americas. Be specific and refer back to the text!!
Objective
Bellwork
List as many words
as you can that describes what you think life on a plantation would be like.
Black History Month Spotlight
Clarence Thomas
Second African American on the Supreme Court
Graduated from Yale Law School
Descendent of slaves
Grew up in GA with no sewage system or paved roads
Black History Month Spotlight
President Barack Obama
44th President of the United States
First African American (and bi-racial) President of the United States
Graduated from Harvard Law School
He was a Professor of Law
Grew up in Hawaii
Father was not around much
Is "The Man"
Life as A Slave
1) What did it mean to be a slave? What were some of the basic rights that slaves did not have?

2) Why did people own slaves in the United States in the 1800s?

3) Describe the life of a slave on a Southern plantation. Where did slaves live? What kinds of work did they do? How were they punished?

4) What do you think were some of the hardest things about being a slave?
Discussion Questions
Think & Free Write - 2 minutes
Pair Share - 2 minutes
Group Share
Circle any main idea
about life as a slave.

Underline details that describe life as a slave.


Slave Owners
Nowadays when I hear folks growling and grumbling about not having this and that I just think what would they done if they be brought up on the Moore plantation. The Moore plantation belong to Master Jim Moore, in Moore, South Carolina. The Moores had own the same plantation and the same [slaves] and their children for years back. When Master Jim’s pappy die he leave the whole thing to Master Jim, if he take care of his mammy. [Master Jim’s mammy] sure was a rip-jack. She say [slaves] didn’t need nothing to eat. They just like animals, not like other folks. She whip me, many time with a cow hide, till I was black and blue.

Master Jim’s wife was Mary Anderson. She was the sweetest woman I ever saw. She was always good to every [slave] on the plantation… She never talk mean. Just smile that sweet smile and talk in the softest tone. And when she laugh, she sound just like the little stream back of the spring house gurgling past the rocks. And her hair all white and curly, I can remember her always.
The Plantation
Master Jim own the biggest plantation in the whole country. Just thousands acres of land. And the old Tiger River a running right through the middle of the plantation. One side of the river stood the big house, where the white folks live and on the other side stood the quarters. The big house was a pretty thing all painted white, a standing in a patch of oak trees. I can’t remember how many rooms in that house but powerful many…

The quarters just long row of cabins daubed with dirt. Ever one in the family live in one big room. In one end was a big fireplace. This had to heat the cabin and do the cooking too. We cooked in a big pot hung on a rod over the fire and bake the corn pone [cornbread] in the ashes or else put it in the skillet and cover the lid with coals. We always have plenty wood to keep us warm. That is if we have time to get it out of the woods.
Complete Making History Rubric
Turn in the exit tray on your way out!
History Minutes
I CAN identify slavery and modern day slavery.

I CAN compare modern day slavery and antebellum slavery.
What is slavery to you?
Bellwork -
February 12
Using your
prior knowledge
and information from

the chart
:

do you think slaves should have revolted (fought back) more often?

3 or more sentences!
Nat Turner
Objectives
I CAN identify Nat Turner.

I CAN determine what kind of person Nat Turner was.
Today we’re going to read about a slave who led a rebellion in 1831. Before we begin, let’s see what the textbook says.
Turn to
Page 376
.
Independently
and
silently
read the "History Makers" section and "Slave Rebellion" section.

AFTER YOU READ:
Write down your answer in
at least 2 sentences
to the question in red.
Answer in your journal.
Question: Based on the textbook (and anything else you might know), what kind of person do you think Nat Turner was?
Homework
Read
pages 373 - 377
.

Answer
questions 1 and 4

Extra credit #5
Nat Turner Timeline: 1831
August 22
The rebellion begins with Nat Turner and his group of men.

August 23
Nat's army dissembles after killing 55 white men, women, and children. Nat disappears. An army is set out to bring him in.

October 30
Nat is captured after 70 days.

November 1-4
Thomas Gray visits Nat and compiles
The Confessions of Nat Turner

November 5
At his trial, Nat pleads his innocence but is found guilty as an insurgent and is sentenced to be hanged.

November 11
Nat is hanged. He hurries the hangman and dies at noon.
Today we’re going to read three documents that evaluate the kind of person Nat Turner was. We need to decide which of these characterizations we believe.
Primary Source Analysis
Who was Nat Turner? Was he a hero or a madman?
What is your evidence?
What other evidence would you like to have to inform your decision?
Why do the characterizations in Documents A, B, and C differ?
Which do you think is most trustworthy?
How does the passage of time affect how people view(ed) Turner?
How do you think most people today would characterize Turner?
Discussion Questions
Life as a slave was grueling. What was life like for a plantation slave in the United States?
Read sections "The Plantation" and "Family Work" with your table groups or individually.

Circle main ideas about life as a slave.
Underline details that describe life as a slave.

Expectations:
Be on task at least 90% of the time!
Talk only to your group members.
Talk in a whisper.

You have 10 minutes.

If you finish early, continue reading.
February 11
Document B
APPARTS
Author
Place and Time
Prior Knowledge
Audience
Reason
The main idea
Significance
Use information from all three documents to answer the question:

What kind of person was Nat Turner?

Bellwork - February 11
The William Jasper family, 1808-1870
William Jasper, an African American, was probably born in 1808 not far from George Washington’s plantation in Mount Vernon. He was born a slave on the plantation of William Hayward Foote’s Hayfield plantation. Foote was one of the richest men in Fairfax County—when he died he owned 50 slaves.

Jasper worked on a plantation that grew wheat and corn, and raised horses, cattle, sheep and hogs. Slaves at Hayfield, including Jasper, are likely to have had skills as farmers, blacksmiths and carpenters.

Jasper and his family were not sold south to booming cotton and sugar plantations, as were many other slaves.

According to his will, Foote decided to free his slaves on or soon after his death in 1846. At this time Jasper, in his thirties, was valued by appraisers to be worth $350. Foote’s will also freed Jasper’s wife Sara, in her mid-twenties, and their two daughters who were six and four. They were actually freed in the early 1850’s.

It is important to note that the Jaspers were free blacks in Virginia before the Civil War. But even as free blacks they faced numerous obstacles. They could not: own a gun, obtain an education, vote, conduct business freely, worship in religious services unless supervised by whites. Also they might be captured by slave traders and sold back into slavery.

The Jaspers wanted to stay in Virginia near friends and family, so in 1853 and 1858 they chose to register as free blacks in Fairfax County to prove that they were free. This meant they could travel and gain employment.

In 1860 William Jasper purchased 13 acres of land near the Hayfield Plantation. It is likely that he put together the $200 to pay a white farmer and slave owner for the land from his work as a farmer.

The Jaspers probably did not stay on their newly bought land during the Civil War -- and it is also likely that what they had on this land, including buildings, animals and crops, was lost during the war.
1860
Created by Edith Sprouse, it is located in the Fairfax County Circuit Court Archives, Fairfax, Virginia.
In 1831-32, the Virginia state legislature considered resolutions that supported the gradual emancipation of slaves or their shipment to Africa. The resolutions received a substantial number of votes but failed to pass. This debate and the defeat of the resolutions was the result, in part, of timing, for in 1831 a major slave rebellion led by Nat Turner, erupted in Virginia. Instead of granting freedom, southern masters tightened their grip on blacks, free and enslaved, and on anyone else who challenged their right to own slaves. In Virginia, fearing the influence of antislavery literature, it became illegal to teach slaves to read. Nonetheless, the existence of such a debate suggests the problems Upper South slaveowners faced in sustaining the institutions of slavery.
After Each Paragraph
: Summarize the main idea of each paragraph in at least a sentence.


Main Idea of Paragraph 1
Virginia's government tightened their rule over slaves after Virginia tried to end slavery.
With your table groups or individually, continue to read about freed slaves in Virginia.
What do you notice?



What questions do you have?


What is the context (Prior Knowledge) of this map?
Answer in
complete sentences.

1) Who was Nat Turner?

2) What did he do?

3) What do you think
is going on in the
photo to the right?
-What do you see?
-What is being said?
Objectives
I CAN identify free black slaves.

I CAN describe the life of a free black slave.
Create a list of 5 - 10 myths and facts about slavery and free blacks using the all your information from our slavery unit.

You need to include an explanation of why or how the myths are false.
Homework
Read
pages 373 - 377
.

Answer
questions 1 and 4

Extra credit #5

TCAP COACH
Read
138 - 140
.

Answer
questions 1 - 4
and
Show What You Know

President's Day Social Media
Share a picture of your favorite president along with a reason why they are.

Facebook
@WeTheStudentsGroup
Twitter
@bristudents
Instagram
@wethestudents

TAG YOUR POSTS:
#myfavoritepresident

Most likes/favorites wins a pizza party for our class!!! ...and you get a $25 Amazon gift card!
OPTION 1
Write 3-5 tweets describing life as a slave. (140 character max!)
OPTION 2
Create a 3-5 scene cartoon about what life on a plantation was like.
OPTION 3
Write an imaginary blog post describing life as a plantation salve.
OPTION 4
Write a poem or rap about what life was like for a plantation slave.
With a
partner
at your table group
or individually
, complete 2 of the following
activities
.
Each person must record it in their journal.
3
= tell three things you learned in the lesson,
2
= tell two things that surprised you, and
1
= tell one question you have. Then,

Using the 3-2-1,
write a paragraph
that depicts what you learned in the lesson. Be specific.
3-2-1 Chart
Write diary of a slave, a slave owner, or a freed slave.

Include
at least three entries
,
supporting
your writing with
historical events
and information gathered from the
primary sources
studied.
Diaries
Choose one of the following activities to do
. You may talk with your neighbor in a whisper while you do it.
Homework

Read
pages 373 - 377
.

Answer
questions 1 and 4

Extra credit #5
Trackers
Fill out
your
trackers.

Paste or tape
them on the
front cover of your journal.
Trackers
Fill out
your
trackers.

Paste or tape
them on the
front cover of your journal.
Trackers
Fill out
your
trackers.

Paste or tape
them on the
front cover of your journal.
What kind of document are we looking at?

What year was this document published? (
Place and Time
)

Who is the author of this document? (
Author
)

Why was this document created? (
Reason
)

What do we think the document is about? (
The Main Idea
)
Document Analysis
Bellwork - February 12
1) What do you think daily life was like for a freed slave in antebellum (pre Civil War) America?

Answer in at least 2 complete sentences.
2)
Solomon Northup was a free man of color who was kidnapped and sold into slavery. Shortly after his escape, he published his diary and brought legal action against his kidnappers, though they were never tried in court. The details of his life thereafter are unknown, but he is believed to have died in Glen Falls, New York, around 1863. He told his story in his autobiography "Twelve Years a Slave."
Objectives
I CAN identify Solomon Northup.

I CAN evaluate the life of Solomon Northup.
Individually or with your table group, read the select passages from Solomon Northup's diary.

Expectations
On task at least 90% of the time.
Talk only with your group members.
Raise your hand if you have a question.
Talk so only your group can hear you.
1) Who wrote this document? When and where was it published? What kind of publication is it?

2) According to the author of this article, what kind of person is Nat Turner? Think about when this article was written: How might its publication date affect how the author represents Turner? Refer to your timeline if necessary.

http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/slavery/videos/nat-turners-rebellion
In your table groups or individually, you will read passages from his autobiography and analyze documents that relate to his life.

1) Answers all questions in complete sentences in your journal.
2) Write down any questions that you have.

Expectations:
Talk only with your group members
Be on task 90% of the time.
Raise your hand if you have a question.
Talk so only your group can hear you.
Black History Month Spotlight
Candace Parker
Born in St. Louis, MO
Attended University of Tennessee
#1 overall pick in the WNBA draft
First woman to dunk in a game
WNBA Rookie of the Year and
MVP in 2008
Women Sports Foundation
Sportswoman of the Year
TAKE OUT YOUR HOMEWORK!!!
1) What did you think?

2) What do you think Northup was thinking entire time he was kidnapped and forced to work?

3) How do you think Northup's story was received by other slaves?

4) Solomon Northup's Twelve Years a Slave was one of some 150 so-called "Slave Narratives" published before the Civil War. Their purpose was to give the white Northerners a first-hand glimpse of slavery and to enlist them in the antislavery crusade. They were both literature and propaganda. What is the main idea of Northup's description of Southern slavery?
Discussion
OPTION 1
Write 5-7 tweets describing life as a slave. (140 character max!)
OPTION 2
Create a 3-5 scene cartoon about what life was like for a slave.
OPTION 3
Write an imaginary blog post describing life as a slave, plantation owner, or freed slave.
OPTION 4
Write a poem or rap about what life was like for a slave.
With a
partner
at your table group
or individually
, complete 1 of the following
activities
.
Each person must record it in their journal.
Background
Black History Month Spotlight
Candace Parker
Born in St. Louis, MO
Attended University of Tennessee
#1 overall pick in the WNBA draft
First woman to dunk in a game
WNBA Rookie of the Year and
MVP in 2008
Women Sports Foundation
Sportswoman of the Year
Full transcript