Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Life of a Factory Worker in the 17th and 18th Century

The ins and outs of how people suffered for money and how money made people suffer
by

Savanna Cabrera

on 13 February 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Life of a Factory Worker in the 17th and 18th Century

By Savanna Cabrera The Life of a Factory Worker during the 17th and 18th Centuries What was life like for factory workers in the 17th and 18th centuries? Was it hard? What were the benefits and problems that came from working in factories in that time? Essential Question Women, children, and men all worked in factories. Whenever children are old enough to work, they are sent to work.

Child labor soared during the Industrial Revolution. Because children are smaller and can be paid less, factory managers were more eager to employ the use of children. However, these are children, and this means that they have a tendency to get hurt by the machinery. Who worked in Factories? Factories were often dangerous and machines were usually hazardous and could easily mangle a man's hand.
Loud conditions usually left a man deaf and children especially can develop hearing problems at an early age!
Factories were usually dirty and they could poison a man's lung.
Back then there were no safety codes that would guarantee safety for the worker, many were hurt by the terrible conditions. What was the factory like? Factory workers would start their day very early, at 5 AM, and they would eventually walk to the factory.
The workers would then work in textile, coal, steel, and other manufacturer factories for the rest of the day, until 11 PM.
They only had half an hour to eat breakfast and dinner. Going through a day Due to the fact that the terrible conditions were killing children and women, lawmakers and reformers demanded regulations to help make change.
1833 Factory Act: Limited the working age and hours for children.
1842 Mines and Collieries Act: Banned women and children from working in the mines
Other acts helped regulate working hours for women and children, ultimately improving the life for the people working in the factories. Reforms Because the urbanization of Britain and the factories being near the cities, a great mass of people migrated to the cities to get work.
Because all of these people moving to the cities at once, the rapidly growing cities didn't prepare for the population shift and the city life was hard.
The cities were crime ridden, dirty, polluted, and most of all, cramped. A large family would have to live in a tiny, one-room apartment during that time period. City Life Near the Factories Answer The Question What was life like for factory workers in the 17th and 18th centuries? Was it hard? What were the benefits and problems that came from working in factories in that time?
Full transcript