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Hearing, Touch, Taste, and Smell

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by

Stuart Jones

on 6 November 2013

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Transcript of Hearing, Touch, Taste, and Smell

Hearing, Touch, Taste, and Smell
Hearing
Outer Ear
Taste and Smell
Both taste and smell are chemical senses
Touch
Top Down Processing
Pinna
Auditory Canal
Eardrum
Middle Ear
Three bones:
hammer (malleus)
Anvil (incus)
Stirrup (stapes)
Inner Ear
Cochlea
Hair Cells
Auditory Nerve
Hearing and the Brain
Auditory Cortex
Loudness, Pitch, and Location
Loudness
number of hair cells that respond to stimulation
Pitch
Place Theory: different sound waves trigger a response from hair cells in different locations in the cochlea
Frequency Theory: brain determines pitch by the frequency of neural impulses
Location
one ear receives sound sooner and at a greater intensity
Taste
Five Basic Tastes
Sweet
Salty
Sour
Bitter
Umami
What does each taste tell us about the food?
Biology of Taste
Bump on tongue contains 200 taste buds
Each has a pore that catches food molecules
Each pore has 150-200 receptor cells
Psychological Factors
Expectations
Sensory Interaction
Smell
Biology of Smell
Psychological Factors
Experience and Smell
Basic Skin Sensations
Warm
Cold
Pain
Pressure
Rubber Hand Illusion
Phantom Limbs
Explain how top-down processing plays a role in each. (Note: Phantom Limbs video should start 9m30s into video)
Kinesthesis and Vestibular Sense
Kenisthesis: sense of position and movement of individual body parts
Vestibular Sense: sense of body movement and positioning, including balance
inner ear (semicircular canals)
Pain
Biology
Nociceptors detect harmful temperatures, pressure or chemicals and relay that information to the brain

Gate Theory
Psychological Factors
Distraction
Brain focuses on:
peak moment
pain at the end
Sociocultural Factors
being around those in pain can increase pain response
gender expectations
social role expectations
Full transcript