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Satire1

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Tom Du

on 13 September 2012

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Transcript of Satire1

SATIRE What is satire? Satire
A creative genre in which criticism regarding a particular cultural behaviour or other activity is displayed through strong use of irony and sarcasm. This type of criticism can be humorous, though entertainment and humour are not necessarily the primary goal; The primary purpose of satire is almost always criticism,

Though there can be secondary effects produced by it.
The use of satire allows someone to express ideas in a way that is more disarming, allowing the actual message of the criticism to more clearly come through, often through the use of wit, sarcasm, and irony. examples of satire NAPLAM - Banksy Banksy is a England-based graffiti artist, political activist and painter. His satirical street art usually uses dark humour, and is about topics such as culture, ethics and politics. One of his works, "Napalm" is a satire
about war It is a satire about how innocent people are affected by war.

This satire is based on a famous photograph taken of a napalm attack during the Vietnam War.

The picture uses contrast between the two characters and the screaming child
This can be seen to represent the difference between military operations compared to the consumerist society. The Starbucks Rant Song After a stressful day at work back in July, he posted "The Starbucks Rant Song" on YouTube. While wearing shorts and what appears to be a Starbucks apron, Christopher Cristwell strums away at his guitar singing an off-key, rapid-fire ode to the stereotypical customers that buy the pricey drinks. It is considered a satire, as he creates the song to mock customers, as well as working at Starbucks. He also says how he never did some of the things in the song Cristwell uses humour and sarcasm to communicate his message The World according to America “The world according to America”, shows America at the centre of the map, with the words ‘land of the free and of the brave’. The map shows the views that America has towards other countries The map plays on the fact that America views other countries in certain ways
However, it also shows stereotypes towards America, such as stupidity Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb Dr. Strangelove, is a 1964 black comedy film which satirises the nuclear scare. It was directed by Stanley Kubrick.The film is loosely based on Peter George's Cold War thriller novel Red Alert, also known as Two Hours to Doom. “Weird Al” Yankovic – eBay (song) Weird Al Yankovic is an American singer-songwriter, music producer, actor, comedian and satirist. Most of his work depends on satirizing popular culture, such as television, food, and music. The song is a satire, with the purpose of mocking consumerism.
This is shown through the lyrics, which lists ridiculous items bought off the internet.
The song uses humour and parody to convey its message He uses humour to emphasize how people buy unnecessary items, and he also lists ridiculous items Gulliver's Travels Gulliver's Travels, is a novel by Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift.
It is a satire on human nature and a parody of the "travellers' tales" literary sub-genre. It is Swift's best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature. Drawing by Pawel Kuczynski This satire points out the fact that humans have animals for pets such as dogs and cats, which are cared for, yet also eat animals for food. The picture shows its message quite clearly, with on one side, a cat that is cared for, and on the other side, there is a knife pointed in the direction of the other animals Satirical Cartoon - Cathy Wilcox This satirical cartoon by Cathy Wilcox gets to the heart of the important refugee issue currently affecting Australia. Here, the Australian embassy is not accepting any more refugee applications while a shady people-smuggler hides behind the embassy, offering another way to Australia. This cartoon shows how desperate people resort to other ways to travel to Australia through boat, as the legal process is too long and unreliable THANK YOU Dr. Strangelove satirises Cold War attitudes, such as the "missile gap" between the US and the USSR.
It mainly focuses its satire on how they should be deterred from a nuclear war, as both sides would get destroyed, no matter who won. In Gulliver's Travels, Swift satirises politics relentlessly through his portrayal of the rival Lilliputian factions. He attacks religion in his depiction of the big and little endians. Finally, Swift satirises Western Culture as a whole through the words of the wise king of Brobdingnag. Through his novel, Swift satirises party politics, religious differences, and Western Culture in ways still relevant to today's world. Dr. Strangelove challenges the idea of war, and compares it to nothing but a cheap mockery created by emotionally crippled men. The satire is shown with the individuals, who play their role in an absurd way, making it entertaining Additional info and detailed analysis Satire is a creative genre in which criticism regarding a particular cultural behaviour or other activity is displayed through strong use of irony and sarcasm. This type of criticism can be humorous, though entertainment and humour are not necessarily the primary goal; the humour is often used to offset the harshness of the criticism itself. Different methods can be used to create this criticism, though it often comes from demonstrating the ridiculous or offensive nature of an act or comment when placed within another context. Satire is often used in political commentary, usually to indicate how farcical or preposterous something truly is, and can also be used for other forms of criticism.

The primary purpose of satire is almost always criticism, though there can be secondary effects produced by it. In general, someone uses this type of criticism to demonstrate his or her outrage or offense at the actions or words of someone else. This type of criticism can be expressed in many different ways, however, and direct criticism may ultimately feel like a person is simply “preaching” his or her opinion to others. The use of satire allows someone to express ideas in a way that is more disarming, allowing the actual message of the criticism to more clearly come through, often through the use of wit, sarcasm, and irony. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, commonly known as Dr. Strangelove, is a 1964 black comedy film which satirises the nuclear scare. It was directed, produced, and co-written by Stanley Kubrick, starring Peter Sellers and George C. Scott, and featuring Sterling Hayden, Keenan Wynn, and Slim Pickens. The film is loosely based on Peter George's Cold War thriller novel Red Alert, also known as Two Hours to Doom.
The story concerns an unhinged United States Air Force general who orders a first strike nuclear attack on the Soviet Union. It follows the President of the United States, his advisors, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and a Royal Air Force (RAF) officer as they try to recall the bombers to prevent a nuclear apocalypse. It separately follows the crew of one B-52 as they try to deliver their payload. Christopher Cristwell, a California Starbucks barista, was fired from his job after a satricial song he wrote and performed poking fun at some of his demanding customers went viral.
After a stressful day at work back in July, he posted "The Starbucks Rant Song" on YouTube. While wearing shorts and what appears to be a Starbucks apron, Christopher Cristwell strums away at his guitar singing an off-key, rapid-fire ode to the stereotypical customers that buy the pricey drinks.
In the satirical rant song, Cristwell takes aim at everyone from the rich ladies who must learn that skinny lattes will not make you lose weight to the angry man who pounds on the window when the store is closed.
But, it is nothing personal. "I stand by the satire. I stand by the comedy," he adds. Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, better known simply as Gulliver's Travels (1726, amended 1735), is a novel by Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift (also known as Dean Swift) that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the "travellers' tales" literary sub-genre. It is Swift's best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature.
The book became popular as soon as it was published (John Gay wrote in a 1726 letter to Swift that "It is universally read, from the cabinet council to the nursery"); since then, it has never been out of print. This satirical cartoon by Cathy Wilcox gets to the heart of the important refugee issue currently affecting Australia. Here, the Australian embassy is not accepting any more refugee applications while a shady people-smuggler hides behind the embassy, offering another way to Australia. It clearly shows why these desperate people are resorting to travelling to Australia by means of a boat as the legal process is too slow, long and unreliable. Banksy is a pseudonymous England-based graffiti artist, political activist and painter. His satirical street art usually uses dark humour, and is about topics such as culture, ethics and politics. He uses a stencilling technique, and his works have been featured on streets and walls across the world.

One of his works ‘Napalm’ is based on a famous photograph taken of a napalm attack during the Vietnam War. In it, a child from the original photograph has been taken and placed next to the figures of Mickey Mouse and Ronald McDonald. The use of this highlights the fact that by protecting their own country, they are bombing citizens in another country, causing harm to innocent people. The juxtaposition of the two characters and the screaming child shows the contrast military operations compared to the consumerist society.
Weird Al Yankovic is an American singer-songwriter, music producer, actor, comedian and satirist. Most of his work depends on satirizing popular culture, such as television, food, and music. Many of his works often parody specific songs.
His “eBay” song uses the original instrumental music from the song “I want it that way” by Backstreet boys. It is a satire, as it mocks consumerism, and how people often buy unnecessary items. He uses humour to emphasise this and lists ridiculous items. The world according to America is one of a series of world map satires, which are labelled with geographical stereotypes and jokes, reflecting the view of the country. These maps are usually badly drawn, and omit some countries.
In “The world according to America”, it shows America at the centre of the map, with the words ‘land of the free and of the brave’. The map shows the view that other countries are uncivilised and undeveloped compared to America. The map plays on the fact that America views other countries in certain ways; however it also shows stereotypes of America of how they have little knowledge about the world. Satire Dr Strangelove Starbucks song Gulliver's Travels Napalm eBay song World according to America Satirical cartoon This cartoon shows how desperate people resort to other ways to travel to Australia through boat, as the legal process is too long and unreliable Here, the Australian embassy is not accepting any more refugee applications while a shady people-smuggler hides behind the embassy, offering another way to Australia. This satirical cartoon by Cathy Wilcox gets to the heart of the important refugee issue currently affecting Australia. Christopher Cristwell, a California Starbucks barista, was fired from his job after a satricial song he wrote and performed poking fun at some of his demanding customers went viral. The world according to America is one of a series of world map satires, which are labelled with geographical stereotypes and jokes, reflecting the view of the country.
(Junk keeps arriving in the mail)

(From that worldwide garage sale) (Dukes Of Hazzard ashtray)

(Hey! A Dukes Of Hazzard ashtray)

Oh yeah ... (I bought it on eBay)



Wanna buy (a PacMan Fever lunchbox)

Wanna buy (a case off vintage tube socks)

Wanna buy (a Kleenex used by Dr. Dre, Dr. Dre)

(Found it on eBay) Lyrics These maps are usually badly drawn, and omit some countries.
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