Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

DD150 Unit 1 Week 1

Topic 4 - Layout - Format - Grid
by

Vivianne Jimenez

on 11 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of DD150 Unit 1 Week 1

Summary Design Basics Think about two things when considering the format of a design. The first is the physical output of the design whether it is a poster, book jacket, or business card.
The other is the boundary of that output, such as the edges or shape of the format. All elements respond to the shape of the page. Once there is familiarity with the formal elements and principles of design one can start to create one-page layouts, such as a poster or magazine ad.
Oftentimes, designers take on jobs that entail multiple page layouts, such as a website or a catalog. This is when the layout becomes difficult and some designers rely on a grid to keep the design unified. According to our graphic design solutions textbook Robin Landa states layout has several goals: Definning
Layout The following will be discussed in this topic: When graphic designers approach a design problem, they have to decide how to communicate the message. Where is the type being placed? Where are the graphic elements being placed? To create a successful design solution a designer must think of the layout of the piece.Layout is the arrangement of type and visuals on a printed or digital page, and concerns the organization and arrangement of type and visuals on two- dimensional surfaces to create effective visual communication. Layout
Format
Grid Fit visual elements into a limited space
Arrange visual elements so that they
are functional, unified and easily
accessible to the viewer
To create visual impact How does one design a successful layout? Begin with the first stage of the design process, concept/idea. A designer must ask questions. Who is the intended audience? What is the purpose of the design? What message has to be communicated? In which format will the final project be seen?After the questions have been answered, a designer can begin to thumbnail layout solutions to the design problem. There are an unlimited number of ways to solve a design problem, but you must keep in mind the following to create a successful solution. Emphasis 
Unity
Balance LAYOUT GOALS EMPHASIS When designing the layout of a page one must ask what is the single most important element of the design problem. In other words, the designer needs to figure out what is the focal point for the design. This can be text or it can be a visual element.Most likely, a client will want to convey a message through text. A designer will need to decide how they are going to address the focal point. They want the message to pop right out to the viewer. It should be the first thing someone looks at when looking at a design. According to our graphic design solutions textbook Robin Landa states, a good way to achieve this is through contrast. LAYOUT TABS Contrast Using Color
Make the focal point the brightest or a different color from anything else. Contrast Using Texture
Give the focal a different texture than the rest of the design. Contrast Using Alignment
Position the focal point on the page so it pops out. Contrast Using Space
Make the focal point the biggest so it looks like it is in front. The smaller the
object the farther back it appears. The most important goal of a layout is to establish a visual hierarchy. It is imperative that the viewer looks at the primary message first then the details later. If you are designing a poster for a concert, the most important element is going to be the name of the performers. You will want your audience to see that first.
Then they can look at when and where the event will take place. Arrange the layout of the poster to create a relationship of the name of the performers with a visual graphic of them. Which is most important? Both elements must be laid out
so they communicate the main message. The minor details will then follow. EXAMPLE Visual Hierarchy
Connection
Alignment
Flow Connection
Establish a look and feel for a design. This unifies the whole design and nothing
looks out of place. Think about a corporation, McDonald’s for instance. One is
not going to use a blue and orange color scheme because McDonald’s already
has a look and feel established. Their main colors are red and yellow. Alignment
Arrange elements so their edges line up or are placed next to one another. This
creates a sense of unity. Flow
The viewer’s eye should flow from one element to the next in a design layout.
This flow unifies a design because the viewer is led through the page without
distraction. Balance is an equal distribution of weight in a layout. It is very important to create
balance in a design. If balance is not in place, the viewer will think something is
wrong and lose interest in the design. Think about the position of your elements
when designing the layout of a design. *UNITY Considering the Format The GRID Contrast Using Color
Make the focal point the brightest or a different color from anything else. Contrast Using Texture
Give the focal a different texture than the rest of the design. Contrast Using Value
Make the focal point a different value, usually darker values pop up more than
lighter values. Contrast Using Alignment
Position the focal point on the page so it pops out. Contrast Using Space
Make the focal point the biggest so it looks like it is in front. The smaller the
object the farther back it appears. A grid is a guide – a modular, compositional structure made up of verticals and horizontals that divide a format into columns and margins. Margins are the spaces around the type and other design elements.

A grid is especially useful in multi page formats. It keeps the whole design together from page to page. It helps unify the design and creates the ―look and feel. There are various grid formats available to use and countless ways to integrate visual elements within the grid system. Look at the sample design solutions using the grid system. Notice how the designer was able to integrate all the type and graphics and still make it visually pleasing to the eye.

When you have many elements to organize — display type, text type, and visuals – you usually need to establish an underlying structure that can provide help in maintaining clarity, legibility, balance, and unity. This is especially true when you are working with a multipage format where you need to establish a flow or sense of visual consistency from page to the next. We explored the issues surrounding layout in design. We identified the meaning of layout. We reviewed the importance of balance, emphasis and
unity in a layout. We also considered the format when dealing with layout.
Finally, we reviewed how to use the grid as a layout device. 4 Column Grid. See pg. 113 Figure 5-14 2 Column Grid layolut. See Pg.113 for more information. 1 Column Grid layolut. See Pg.113 for more information. *Contrast Using Line
Use line to bold or highlight it from the rest of the design. Contrast Using Value
Make the focal point a different value, usually darker values pop up more than
lighter values. Contrast Using Shape
Make the focal point a unique shape that stands out. Unity is very important when dealing with layout. Three things play a role in
unifying a design.
Full transcript