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INVOLVE ME AND I WILL LEARN

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on 19 May 2015

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Transcript of INVOLVE ME AND I WILL LEARN

INVOLVE ME AND I WILL LEARN
Engaging Students with Accommodations in the Experiential Classroom
"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I may remember. Involve me and I will learn."
- Benjamin Franklin (Falsely Attributed)
ACCOMMODATIONS PROVIDE ACCESS TO DIFFERENT TYPES OF LEARNERS
they change how a student learns, not what they learn
they remove obstacles to demonstrating knowledge
they allow students to be evaluated on their abilities rather than their disabilities.
3 scenarios
You plan on administering a MAT 040 test for your class on Friday. You have a student with low vision in your class and has documentation for assistive technology and computer use.
TYPES OF ACCOMMODATIONS
PRESENTATION
RESPONSE
SETTING
TIMING AND SCHEDULING
a change in the way instructions and information are presented

listening to an audiobook
using a screen-reader
Braille
large print
using a Reader
using an interpreter
changes in the way a student responds to an assessment

computer use
assistive technology (Kurzweil 1000/3000, Dragon)
Scribe use
note takers
calculator use
large print answer sheet
using an interpreter
recording answers
changes in the place where instruction or assessment is given.

testing centers
minimal distraction environments
adaptive furniture
special lighting
individual or group instruction
changes in the length and the time in which assessment occurs

extended time (double time)
shorter assignments / tests
assignments given over the course of several days
taking the test at a time other than class time
- Xun Kuang, Chinese Confucian Philosopher, 312-230 BC
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
learning through reflection or active participation
HOW DO WE LEARN?
We want to make the classroom a safe space for students to disclose.
WHAT PREVENTS DISCLOSURE?
STIGMA
Close to 50% of community college students require academic or testing accommodations, yet many students hesitate to reveal their needs.
PRIVILEGE
Access to support is highly privileged.

Students who have experienced strong support in the past are more likely to disclose in the present.
Students of historically discriminated-against communities are less likely to disclose.

"One bad experience was enough for me, thanks."
MISUNDERSTANDING
Some faculty members are unsure how to incorporate students with accommodations into their lesson plans.

accommodations are provided inconsistently
accommodations are provided without proper paperwork from OSS.
accommodations are not provided at all

Bad experiences with students may color future encounters.

Students may not know how to verbalize their needs to their professors.
may be confused by the process
may be motivated by fear or past experiences to keep silent


WHAT CAN FACULTY DO TO HELP ALL TYPES OF LEARNERS EXPERIENCE THEIR EDUCATION?
2. Include a disability/accessibility statement in your syllabus.
Provide a short statement in your syllabus that details responsibilities, processes, and ways to contact OSS and the Office of Testing.

Discuss your policy on the first day of class, and remind your students of policies before major assignments or assessments.

Meet with OSS and Testing at the beginning of each semester for updates in procedures and policies.
3. Understand your responsibilities as an educator.
You are
legally obligated
to
reasonably accommodate
all students with documented disabilities.

Remind students to provide copies of their accommodations to you and to the Office of Testing at the beginning of each semester.

Students MUST self-identify. Never assume that a student has a disability, or suggest they have one.

When in doubt, contact the Office of Specialized Services.
4. Provide low-stakes opportunities for students to self-identify.
Make your classroom a welcoming classroom before students step into it.

Break the ice with a pre-semester e-mail.
Create a questionnaire for students to fill out before the first day of class.
Schedule one-on-one student conferences
Hold extra office hours
Dedicate the last 20 minutes of a longer class to walk-in student questions.

If you are comfortable disclosing, disclose!


1. Understand what each accommodation means and how it translates to the classroom.
5. Develop a familiarity with student support services on campus.
Office of Specialized Services
L-115
201-612-5269
ossinfo@bergen.edu

Office of Testing
S-127
201-447-7203
testoss@bergen.edu

Health, Wellness, and Personal Counseling
HS-100
201-447-9257

The Henry and Edith Cerullo Learning Assistance Center
L-125
201-447-7489







5. Rethink and re-evaluate your curriculum and assessment skills on a regular basis.
Who really needs the accommodations here: the student or your course?

Changes you make to your course benefit ALL students, not just accommodated ones.
giving alternative means of completing assignments accommodates some students while also challenging high-achieving students.
undiagnosed or undisclosed students benefit from universal design
pedagogical variety allows students to determine what works best for them.

Provide multiple ways for students to access material
post presentations & handouts to Moodle before class meetings
an accessible classroom does not have to be a tech-heavy classroom

What may work for one student/class may not work for another student/class.

Using the paper provided, brainstorm some ways to approach the following scenarios:
You write 3 questions on the board and then break up your class of 20 students into groups of 5 for small group work. As you walk around the room, you notice one student showing visible signs of distress. He misses the next 3 class sessions.
1.
2.
3.
In addition to a 8-10 page research paper, your department requires that all students give a 10-minute presentation of their work, which will make up 20% of their final grade. One of your students finds you after class, concerned that her friend will be unable to complete the assignment, given that she is a selective mute.
You plan on administering a MAT 040 test for your class on Friday. You have a student with low vision in your class who has documentation for assistive technology and computer use.
You write 3 questions on the board and then break up your class of 20 students into groups of 5 for small group work. As you walk around the room, you notice one student showing visible signs of distress. He misses the next 3 class sessions.
1.
2.
3.
In addition to a 8-10 page research paper, your department requires that all students give a 10-minute presentation of their work, which will make up 20% of their final grade. One of your students finds you after class, concerned that her friend will be unable to complete the assignment, given that she is a selective mute.
Make sure to have a clear testing policy. Encourage students to talk with you at the beginning of each semester regarding accommodated testing protocol.

Ask the student what has worked best for him in the past.
Reader/Scribe?
Large Print?
Screen Reader?

If he plans on using a Reader/Scribe and/or a screen reader, drop off the test at Testing Services no later than 48 hours before the intended test date.

Design the test so that a screen reader can read the test.
create textual descriptions for graphs/images.
provide electronic copy of test to Testing Services
avoid fancy formatting that rely on visual cues (like matching, word banks)
meet with the OSS Liaison and Reader/Scribe to discuss any concerns you may have with administering the test.


SHORT-TERM STRATEGIES
give students the option to break up into even smaller groups

assign 1 question to each group

encourage students to take on different roles (speaker, recorder, task-master, etc.)

instruct students to spend 5 minutes pre-writing before sharing their thoughts with the group.

announce that you will go over the answers in class the next day.

reach out to student via e-mail to open dialogue.
LONG-TERM STRATEGIES
Providing alternative means to participating not only aids those with anxiety disorders, traumatic brain injuries, or barriers to language, but also introverted mainstream students
provide questions to students prior to group discussion
collect low-stake writing assignments and refer to good comments during class.
dedicate class time to office hours to meet one-on-one with groups
provide ample time for students to complete exercises
Remember: students must self-disclose.

If the student discloses:
ask what has worked for her in the past
provide alternative means to completing the assignment if necessary.

If the student doesn't disclose:
Demonstrate the numerous forms a presentation can take.
Can a student pre-record their speech?
Use text-to-speech readers?
Make a video?
Direct a presentation?
Work in groups?
QUESTIONS?
testoss@bergen.edu
S-127
3 SCENARIOS, REVISITED
PRESENTATION, RESPONSE, SETTING, TIMING, AND SCHEDULING
RECEIVING ACCOMMODATIONS IS A PROCESS
Documentation is submitted to OSS

Documentation is evaluated by OSS

OSS grants and explains accommodations to students

Accommodation Forms are submitted to OTS and faculty at the beginning of each semester

"This student gets extended time. An extra 15 minutes should do the trick."

"I'm sure that (
made-up statistic
) don't actually need their accommodations. They just want an advantage."

"These students must take the test between these times. No exceptions." (
Student receives extended time, has another class during that time, or needs to test at another time due to physical needs
)

"She has done arithmetic without a calculator in class, so I don't think she has to use one for the test."

"There are no accommodations in the real world, so you better get used to working without them now."
OVERHEARD AT BERGEN
STRATEGIES
STRATEGIES
BONUS SCENARIO: DEALING WITH A DISRUPTIVE STUDENT
Remain calm. Use direct, imperative statements to redirect behavior.

Report any threat of harm to self or others to Public Safety immediately at extension 6 if you are on campus. If you are calling from an off-campus location, call Public Safety at 201-447-9200.

For medical emergencies, dial 2.

For non-life-threatening behavior requiring behavioral assistance, contact OSS at 5269.

Refer unusual behavior to the Behavioral Intervention Team by calling 201-493-3651 or filling out a referral form online.
CHRISTINE FRIEDLANDER EUNICE DOMINGUEZ ELIZABETH RAND
Reader/Scribe, Office of Testing
Adjunct Faculty, Department of English
Testing Assistant and OSS Liaison
Office of Testing
Testing Assistant and Reader/Scribe
Office of Testing
Full transcript