Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Theatre for Young Audiences (TYA)

No description
by

Ramon Esquivel

on 11 February 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Theatre for Young Audiences (TYA)

Theatre for Young Audiences
(TYA)

Dramatic Elements & Dialogue
TYA GENRES

What is the universal truth about the world that you are trying to communicate to your young audience members?

"Nobody should write unless there is something crying to be said. There is absolutely no reason to write—no reason to waste your own time as a writer, no reason to waste an audience's time—unless you're trying to change the world."
Edward Albee
Objectives
Central Character

(CC): Active, pivotal.

Need/Want
:
CC's strong inner desire

Conflict
:
Obstacles to CC's need/want.

Resolution
:
Climax. CC
achieves
or
does not achieve

Need/Want
through actions.

KEY: How does
CC
change?
Dramatic Elements (4)
Genres of TYA
Dialogue as a Story Tool
Writing Dialogue

What you would need to write a scene or to begin a play.
Dramatic Elements
Central Character
Stick to ONE.

Age:
In TYA, the protagonist is often at the top of the age range of target audience
Gender:

Female, male, transgender,
"neutral"

External Influences
:

Family (
Parents + Siblings + Spouses + Children
), Friends (
Romantic + 'Best'
), Social Class, Occupation, Education, Religion, Community Status, Hobbies, Interests

Internal Influences:
Intelligence, Personality, Self Awareness, Sexuality, Spirituality, Morality

KEY:
Know all; reveal only what is necessary
Age:
Late Teens
Gender:
Female
External:
Societal attitudes towards her green skin color
Internal:
Intelligent, insecure, temperamental, principled
Elphaba
(Baum; Maguire; Holzman and Schwartz)
Idina Menzel as Elphaba in
Wicked
. Photo: (C) Joan Marcus
Need / Want
A strong inner desire

Begin with abstract Needs / Wants

I need to
survive
...
I need to
be free
...
I need to
be loved and accepted
...
I need
power

and independence
...
I need
justice
...
I want
revenge
...
I want
respect
...

— AND SO I TAKE ACTION.
Peter Pan
Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up
by J.M. Barrie
"Wendy, Wendy, when you are sleeping in your silly bed you might be flying about with me saying funny things to the stars."
(
I need to be loved.
)
Conflict
What obstacles are in the way?
WHO is in the way?

Frustrate and thwart your Central Character
Focus on CC's flaws/weaknesses, so that the
CC must change
to attain its
Need/Want
.

ANTAGONISTIC CHARACTERS
are excellent devices for establishing CC's
dramatic conflict.
Think back to External Influences of CC.
Central Character's
abstract
need can be symbolized by a CONCRETE want.

This is especially true in TYA.
Abstract vs. Concrete
Wiley and Mother
(Child and Parent)
Wiley and the Hairy Man
by Suzan Zeder
Wiley wants to find the legendary Hairy Man that took away his father, but Mother wants to protect him from danger.
DePaul University production, 1994.
Resolution
Does the Central Character get what s/he Needs/Wants?
Yes or No?
KEY QUESTION:
How has Central Character
changed
at the end?
It depends on what you want to say in your play.
The answer will depend on your
Premise
.

POSITIVE (Comedy) = YES, because of change.
NEGATIVE (Tragedy) = NO, because of no change, or not enough change, or change too late.
Romeo & Juliet
Get what they want, but at what cost?
Jeun Mi-Do & Kang Pil. Photo (c) Korean National Theatre
Theatre for Young Audiences
Stories made for audiences of children and young adults, usually written, directed, and performed by older theater artists.
Stories written, devised, and/or performed
by
children and young adults
for
children and young adults.
Young Adult Theatre
(≈13-19 years)
The Wrestling Season
by Laurie Brooks
Bullying - Rumours - Sexuality
Coterie Theatre, 2012.
Children's Theatre (≈6-12 years)
Honolulu Theatre for Youth / Seattle Children's Theatre
Nothing Is The Same
by Y York
Friendship - Prejudice - War
NEW FIELDS IN TYA

Theatre for Children with Special Needs
&
Crossover - All Ages - "Family Theatre"
&
Hip-Hop Theatre
"Baby Theatre"
Theatre for the Very Young
(≈6 mos. - 5 years)
Oily Cart (UK)
Questions
Imagination
Interaction
Special Needs
Audiences
VIDEO of Trusty Sidekick,
Lincoln Center Education (NYC)
Up and Away
Dialogue
The Playwright's Best Tool
Character
Traits

Character
Motivation

Character
Relationships
Traits
Personality
Mood
Emotional Life
Quirks
Faults
Motivation
Wants
Desires
Dreams
Hopes
Fears
Love
Hate
Relationships
Family
Friends
Allies
Enemies
Salt & Pepper
by Jose Cruz Gonzalez
OLD MAN talks to his grandson, SALT, about postcards from Salt's mother that have been hidden away.

SALT
Why are you hidin' them?

OLD MAN
'Cause it's all I got left of your ma. I don't know what they say. You see, her life wasn't easy. She was just a girl when she had Andy. Then you come along. I wasn't the most understanding daddy. My little Hannah tried to set her life straight, but she never could. One day she just packed off and left. Maybe she tried to sing, maybe she didn't.

SALT
All them stories about my ma, are they lies?

OLD MAN
I made them up so you would be proud of her. So you wouldn't be ashamed. She was always singin' and laughin' with you boys. Your ma did have the prettiest voice you ever heard. I ain't lyin' about that.
The Wrestling Season
by Laurie Brooks

MELANIE GARCIA, 17-years-old, talks to Matt about rumours of her sexual promiscuity, rumours that earned her the nickname "Cherry" Garcia.

MATT
How could you take all the lies about you?

MELANIE
How could I take it? I liked it. I wanted them to talk about me, all right? Nobody talked about me before. No one even knew I existed. Now guys brag about me to their friends. A lot of guys want to go out with me now. Would you have asked me out if my nickname wasn't "Cherry" Garcia? Would you? Would you?
(beat)
I thought so.
Backstory Timeline
(Buzz McLaughlin)
JENNIFER (J) and KAREN (K) become friends, age 12.
They meet their first boyfriends, age 14.
Major fight with third girl, age 15.
K finds boyfriend, RAMI (R), and J meets TOMMY (T). Good period of double dating, senior year.
K breaks up with R, J continues strong with T, summer after graduation.
J and K head off to different colleges.
J breaks up with T halfway through first year.
K and T start dating the following summer.
J confronts K.
If premise is about friendship or loyalty,
start the play when friendship is tested.
Playwrights
J.M. Barrie
Laurie Brooks
Ramon Esquivel
Jose Cruz Gonzalez
Rickerby Hines
Winnie Holzman
Naomi Iizuka
William Shakespeare
Y York
Suzan Zeder
Artists at Oily Cart UK
and Trusty Sidekick USA
Scenes &
One-Minute Plays
Great Practice for Writing Dialogue
Dialogue
Writing Exercise
TWITTER #CWBub
@Bub1974

A sixteen year-old new driver wants to borrow someone’s one and only car for the evening. Write a line of dialogue (1-3 sentences) that demonstrate that the teen …

Has a logical mind, talking to a parent/guardian.
OR
Wants to absorb some of her/his older sibling’s social clout at school.
OR
Connects with a grandparent more than with her/his parents.
Maria Dizzia, Yale Repertory Theatre Photo: (c) Joan Marcus)
Anon(ymous)
Based on
The Odyssey
by Naomi Iizuka
Crossover
PHOTO: (c) Children's Theatre Company
Zana Dare as Peter Pan, 1907
Photo: Neverpedia
VS.
Youth Theatre
Sensory Experience with Story
1-2 characters; 3 at most.
Character 1 has wants/needs.
Character 2 opposes 1.
Character 1 dialogue reflects action and tactics.
Resolution
Pathways into a story
Needs/Wants
Hip-Hop Theatre
Explores contemporary stories and issues using elements of hip-hop culture

Rapping / MCing
B-boying / break-dancing
Graffiti writing
DJing
Dreamscape
by Rickerby Hines
Idea Generator
"The Milestone Exercise"
Created by Buzz McLaughlin

Writing on paper is best for this.
Your full name; no initials
Any nicknames in parentheses
below your formal names
Your birthday including year

NOTE: You will NOT be asked to publicly share any of this writing exercise. It is for you.
Name and Date
Who is that person?
Think (
but

do not write
) about the day that person came into the world.

Who was there?

What were the circumstances around that person's birth?

Think "External Influences."
Three-Minute Brainstorm
Free association
Think of every important event in your life. List them.

Words, phrases, images OK.

Order does not matter.
Do not self-edit; if it pops in your head, write it down.

Aim for 30+ events.
Three-Minute List
On a separate paper ...

Write the EIGHT (8) most significant events from your brainstorm.

Choose only those have profoundly affected your life.
Eight events exactly
.
Milestones
On a third piece of paper ...

Write your full name
Nicknames under names
Date of birth
Eight (8) significant events in chronological order.
KEY: Mining
your
emotional truth is the key to writing an honest play.
Professional TYA Theaters
(Canada)
Green Thumb, Carousel Theatre (Vancouver)
Quest Theatre (Calgary)
Concrete Theatre (Edmonton)
Manitoba Theater for Young People (Winnipeg)
Young People's Theatre, Roseneath (Toronto)
Halifax Theater for Young People
Geordie, DynamO Théatre (Montreal)
Professional TYA Theatres (United States)
Seattle Children's Theatre
Children's Theatre Company (Minneapolis)
Milagro Theatre (
Portland
)
Childsplay (
Phoenix
)
Kennedy Center Family Theater (Washington DC)
Imagination Stage (Bethesda)
Dallas Children's Theatre
The Coterie (Kansas City)


Coterie Theatre
ZACH Theatre
Luna
, Pittsburgh Playhouse

Ramón Bub Esquivel
Luna
by Ramón Esquivel
SOLEDAD
Someday, I'm going to visit you. In person ... I want to be an astronaut. The first woman on the moon. Maybe in a spaceship Papa and I wanna build. But if that doesn't work out, I'll just go in a NASA spaceship.

LUNA
I can't wait.

SOLEDAD
It's hard to be an astronaut. But I can work hard. (
beat
) I've only told Papa and Mama this. And now you.

LUNA
Thank you, Soledad ... For sharing your dream with the moon.
Pittsburgh Playhouse
PHOTO or SCREENSHOT to
crwr203devries1@ubccreativewriting.ca

Subject: <Last Name><First Name> TYA Dialogue
Full transcript