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Received Curriculum

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Joe Hallemeier

on 6 September 2015

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Transcript of Received Curriculum

Received Curriculum
By: Joe Hallemeier

What is received curriculum?
Received curriculum is a shorten way of saying:

What the student understands, learns, and retains.

Think Bigger than School
Bridge the gap
There is a gap between the "taught curriculum" and the "received curriculum"
Measure Learning
Received Curriculum
This is also considered "learned curriculum". However, it does not just relate to educational curriculum.
It can also relate to the social, emotional, and physical concepts that are learned in the classroom.

"The gap between what taught and what is learned - both intended and unintended-is large."
Cuban, Larry (1992) Curriculum stability and change. In Jackson, Philip (ed.) Handbook of Research on Curriculum. American Educational Research Association
"Just because you teach it, it doesn't mean they learn it."
Students need to be assessed to determine if the gap between what is taught and the understanding is closing
Do:
Do not:
Measure student's understanding of specific skills.
Use frequent checks of progress.
Guide thinking
Determine level of understanding
Have students rely on procedures for find answers
Use routine thinking
Use general test questions.
Intended
Curriculum
Assessed Curriculum
Enacted
Curriculum
Ultimately, it is received curriculum that is most important.

The other three areas need to be coordinated to facilitate and enhance received curriculum
Thoughts:
References:
This type of curriculum is of great importance. We must be able to measure students understanding concepts. Teaching is not the same as student learning. A teacher has to be able to meet the needs of their students, and be able to determine what they actually know.
Kelly, A. V. (2009). The curriculum: Theory and practice (pp. 1–55). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
Cuban, Larry (1992) Curriculum stability and change. In Jackson, Philip (ed.) Handbook of Research on Curriculum. American Educational Research Association
Jackson, Philip W. "Conceptions of Curriculum and Curriculum Specialists." In Handbook of Research on Curriculum: A Project of the American Educational Research Association, edited by Philip W. Jackson, 3–40. New York: Macmillan Pub. Co., 1992.
Wiles, Jon (2008). Leading Curriculum Development. p. 2. ISBN 9781412961417.
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