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Figurative Language

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Bianca Soto

on 12 January 2016

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Transcript of Figurative Language

SOME FORMS OF FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE
- Similes
- Metaphors
- Hyperbole
- Onomatopoeia
- Personification
- Alliteration
- Assonance
- Allusion
- Oxymoron
What is Figurative Language?
Nobody wants to read boring sentences. So every writer from Charles Dickens to Lupe Fiasco uses a technique that makes their words jump off the page. They use figurative language. Figurative language means that the words you use don’t have their literal meaning, but instead are meant to be imaginative, vivid and evocative. So what is figurative language? Simply, it makes writing more interesting.
SIMILES
The comparison of two unlike things using the words "like" or "as."
Ex. "Cute as a kitten"
"Busy as a bee"
"Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what your going to get"
"As big as a cow"
NOW YOU TRY!
Create two similes.
METAPHORS
A comparison between two unlilke things not using the words "like" or "as." Instead, the words "is" or "are" are used.
Some examples of Metaphors
- Her home is a prison.
- She has a heart of a gold.
- It's raining cats and dogs.
- You light up my life.
- He was boiling mad.
NOW YOU TRY!
Create two metaphors.
HYPERBOLE
An exaggeration used to emphasize a point, and is used for expressive or comic effect. A hyperbole is not to be taken literally.
Ex. -Yeah, I already beat that game 80,000 years ago.
-Nobody listens to that song anymore.
-Old Mr. Johnson has been teaching here since the Stone Age.
-These shoes are killing me.
ONOMATOPOEIA
In its simplest form, onomatopoeia is produced by a single word that sounds like the thing it refers to.
sizzling
splash
slithered
boom
whine
birds whistle
frogs croak
flags flutter
splish-splash
jingle
rattle
squeak
whisper
bang
PERSONIFICATION
Personification is when the speaker or writer gives human characteristics, qualities, or traits to an object or idea.
EXAMPLES OF
PERSONIFICATION
-Fear knocked on the door. Faith answered. There was no one there.
-The rain kissed my cheeks as it fell.
-The wind sang her mournful song through the falling leaves.
-The flowers begged for water.
-The camera loves her.
NOW YOU TRY!
Create two hyperboles.
YOUR TURN!
Create two sentences using onomatopoeia.
NOW YOU TRY!
Create two sentences using personification.
ALLUSIONS
An allusion is a figure of speech that makes a reference to, or representation of, people, places, events, literary work, myths, or works of art, either directly or by implication.
Ex.
"I was surprised his nose wasn't growing like Pinocchio's"
"He is your modern day Michael Jordan"
"He was a real Romeo with the ladies."
YOUR TURN!
Write two sentences which contain an allusion.
ALLITERATION
In language, alliteration is the repetition of a particular sound in the first syllables of a series of words or phrases.
Examples of ALLITERATION
Peter pushed the parrot purposely.
Sally sold sea shells by the sea shore.
All the animals ate apples in the afternoon.
NOW YOU TRY!
Create two examples of Alliteration.
ASSONANCE
The repetition of a VOWEL sound to create internal rhyme.
Examples of ASSONANCE
uncertain rustlings of purple curtains.
on a proud round cloud, in white heightt night.
and the moon rose over an open field.
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