Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project

No description
by

Karlie Noon

on 7 December 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project

Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project
STEM Education Conference: Building STEM Capability in Schools
Michael Tynan | Research Coordinator | 5 October 2016
Presentation Overview
The Indigenous STEM Education Program
Goal
Program elements
Evaluation
Theory of change
Research questions and indicators
Program element program logics
Evaluation methods
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage 2014 report (SCRGSP 2014)
Non-Indigenous completions remained relatively steady - 86-88%.
Non-Indigenous rate was stable (75 per cent in 2011-12),
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Proportion of Indigenous 20-24 year olds completing year 12 - increased from 45% in 2008 to 59% in 2012-13.
Proportion of 20–64 year olds with or working towards post-school qualifications increased from 26 per cent in 2002 to 43 per cent in 2012-13 although the gap remained the same.

Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 17–24 year olds participating in post-school education, training or employment increased from 32 per cent in 2002 to 40 per cent in 2012-13.

Dreise and Thomson (2014: 1) identify that the PISA results of 2013 in mathematics, scientific and reading literacy show Indigenous 15 year olds remain two and a half years behind their non-Indigenous peers in school, the same as a decade ago.
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Figure 1: Estimated year 12 students obtaining an ATAR of 50% or above, 2007-2013* (Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage 2014)
*Note that the percentage is of the number of students estimated to be in year 12. This estimation is obtained by dividing the number of 15-19 year old Australian residents by five. This method of estimation comes with significant errors. Such errors are even more significant for the Indigenous data as the residential data of 15-19 year olds is also an estimation based on birth and fertility rates. In addition, variables such as retention rates beyond year 10 have not been considered. Due to this, the ATAR graphs obtained from the OID data should be used with caution.
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Figure 2: Mean differences between Australian and New Zealand Indigenous and non-Indigenous students in science literacy and engagement in science expressed in standard deviation units (Woods-McConney et al., 2013: 241).
McConney et al., (2011: 2026) showed individual SES and Indigenous status to explain just less than 25% of difference.
However, reading literacy accounts for an additional 62% and mathematics literacy accounts for a further 6% of variance.
In total 93% of variation explained for this sample of students

Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
Figure 3: Commencing Indigenous higher education students by broad field of education, 2004-2014 (Australian Government, 2016).
Evaluating the CSIRO Indigenous STEM Education Project | Michael Tynan
References
Australian Government, Department of Education and Training (2016) Higher Education Statistics: Student Data. Viewed 17 August 2016
< https://www.education.gov.au/student-data>.

Dreise, T and Thomson, S (2014) Unfinished business : PISA shows Indigenous youth are being left behind.
<http://research.acer.edu.au/indigenous_education/37>.

Luke, A. Cazden, C. Coopes, R. Klenowski, V. Ladwig, J. Lester, J. MacDonald, S. Phillips, J. Shield, P. G. Spina, N. Theroux, P. Tones, M. J. Villeges, M. and Woods, A. F. (2013) A Summative Evaluation of the Stronger Smarter Learning Communities Project: Vol 1 and Vol 2. Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD

McConney, A, Oliver, M, Woods-McConney, A, & Schibeci, R (2011) Bridging the Gap? A Comparative, Retrospective Analysis of Science Literacy and Interest in Science for Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australian Students. International Journal of Science Education, 33(14), 2017–2035.

Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision (SCRGSP) (2014) Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage- Key Indicators 2014: Overview. Viewed 31 August 2016,
<http://www.pc.gov.au/research/ongoing/overcoming-indigenous-disadvantage/key-indicators-2014/key-indicators-2014-overviewbooklet.pdf>.

Woods-McConney, A, Oliver, M, McConney, A, Schibeci, R and Maor, D (2013) Science Engagement and Literacy: A retrospective analysis for students in Canada and Australia. International Journal of Science Education, 36 (10). pp. 1588-1608. doi:10.1007/s11165-011-9265-y


The Stronger Smarter Learning Communities Evaluation Report (Luke et al. 2013)
Major Finding 1:
That the Stronger Smarter Model’s recognition of the prevalence of deficit thinking in schools is accurate

Major Finding 6:
That the predominant, default modes of pedagogy for Indigenous students are basic skills instruction leading to vocational education pathways

Major Finding 8:
Lack of school leader and teacher knowledge of and engagement with Indigenous communities are a major impediment to community engagement and school reform
Full transcript