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Non-Profit DayCare

Foundations of Early Childhood Education
by

Amanda M.

on 16 March 2013

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Transcript of Non-Profit DayCare

References Non-Profit Daycare Up-to-date immunizations

Toilet trained (depending on age)

Initial Interview What is Non-Profit Daycare? Admission Publicly funded childcare
Funded through the Provincial and/or Municipal Government

Goal is to provide quality service and programs for the children and their families

All money received through fees/donations is put back into the center Financial Assistance Subsidies available for families
Through their respective municipal governments

Criteria for subsidies vary depending on location

Usually the difference is paid for by the parents but can sometimes be paid for by Social Services (in some smaller towns and depending on the scenario) By:
Catherine Allardyce
Shari Cash
Melanie Galante
Alyssa McDanielYuill Amanda Muldoon Genevieve Oxner
Andrea Stewart
and
Wei Zhang Waitlist All the Centers we visited had a wait list except Kleinburg YMCA of the GTA

Wait time varies
A couple weeks up to 18 months

Ottawa - Centralized wait list Centralized Wait List "Child Care Information is a bilingual, non-profit information and referral service on early learning and child care. The program has been mandated by the City of Ottawa to manage the Child Care Centralized Waiting List for all Licensed Child Care Centres and Home Child Care Agencies within the City of Ottawa boundaries. Rates Rates vary from center to center

Each age group has a different rate
Toddlers, Preschoolers and Kinders : $25.00 - $47.00
School Agers : $15.00 - $33.00

Only The Children's Place (http://www.childrensplace.on.ca/) offers a discount for multiple children (-5% per child) Meals & Nutrition Meals can be catered or cooked on-site
Menu made by cook or by the catering company

All meal plans follow the Canadian Food Guide and Day Nursery Act

Food is offered 3 times a day (at minimum)
Morning Snack, Lunch & Afternoon Snack
Dinner is served at some centers that offer extended hours

Some centers do not allow parents to provide food unless for specific dietary needs Allergies All centers are nut-free
Some restrict shellfish and pork
Some restrictions are made and then lifted once the child with allergies has left the program Centers Visited Cumberland Hub Cumberland Hub Programming These Centers are part of a group of four to six sites
All use E.L.E.C.T and have a centralized system for managing curriculum YMCA - Play To Learn
Developed by Lorrie Huggins
Being launched nationally All staff are trained for this curriculum

All program planning is done according to the Playing to Learn guidelines Specifically developed for children up to age six (YMCA of Greater Toronto, 2011)

YMCA offers a school age curriculum called "A Place to Connect" for children aged 4-12 (YMCA of Greater Toronto, 2011) Incorporates a bit of E.L.E.C.T principles

Every preschool/kinder aged child has a book based on the Continuum of Development with age-specific activities and milestones.

Educators observe and record at least one domain a day Available Age-Groups These Centers are all independent or run in cooperation with one sister location Additional Programs Offered Cumberland Hub Kleinburg YMCA Center Megan's Place NYAD YMCA of Owen Sound Grey Bruce Wise Owl Daycare The Children's Place Rockcliffe Child Care Center Parental Involvement Educators provide parents with daily/weekly observations & progress updates Centers plan family activities at the center. Allowing families to connect with each other as well as with the educators. Some centers invite/encourage parents to help out on outrips Some centers have a board of directors that the parents are encouraged to join in order to participate in planning and fundraising for the daycare Some centers offer "Parent's Night Out" - parents sign their child up for evening care allowing the parents to have the evening to themselves Employees Primary Educators are RECE or higher Support staff can range from volunteers, students, parents as well as staff with out specific ECE training Staff usually includes:
Executive Director/Supervisor
Full-time Staff
Part-time Staff
Supply Teachers
Volunteers Staff Training Extra training opportunities offered
CPR & First Aid
Epi Pen training
Curriculum training Must have current Police Record Check Megan's Place Kleinburg YMCA NYAD A. Muldoon, personal photo, February 27, 2013 A. Muldoon, personal photo, February 27, 2013 A. Muldoon, personal photo, February 27, 2013 A. Mcdaniel-Yuill, personal photo, February 18, 2013 W. Zhang, personal photo, February 26, 2013 S. Cash, personal photo, February 28, 2013 A. Stewart, personal photo, February 8, 2013 M. Galante, personal photo, February 28, 2013 A. Stewart, personal photo, February 8, 2013 G. Oxner, personal photo, February 19, 2013 C. Allardyce, personal photo, February 19, 2013 C. Allardyce, personal photo, February 19, 2013 (S. Cash, personal photo, February 28, 2013) (YMCA of Greater Toronto, n.d.) For families seeking licensed child care spaces, the Centralized Waiting List greatly simplifies the process by allowing parents/guardians to register their child or children on the waiting list of several child care services in one step." (Child Care Information, n.d.) (Childcare.net, n.d.) Benefits of Non-Profit DayCare YMCA is made up of many facilities (Health and fitness, employment/ education, leadership/ volunteer, housing, community and justice, etc.) thus funding is passed throughout all facilities if one is in need. (M. Young, personal communication, February 28th 2013) More opportunity for those who might otherwise not get the chance to enroll their child in daycare (J. Bell, personal communication, February 19th, 2013) Tend to be less expensive than for profit centres (A. Etmanskie, personal communication, February 18, 2013) Main focus is on providing quality care to children, not making money; corners are not cut to make profits (J. Noseworthy, personal communication, February 26, 2013) Working in non-profit fulfills the desire to give back to your community & be content with the things you have; very rewarding (M. Unus, personal communication, February 19, 2013) Benefits of Non-Profit in Canada The benefits of non-profit daycare organizations have been cited by The Childcare Resource and Research Unit, “an early childhood education and child care (ECEC) policy research institute with a mandate to further ECEC policy and programs in Canada.” (Child Care Canada, n.d) "Canadian research on quality […] shows that —as a group—for-profit centres consistently obtain lower process (also called “observed” or “global”) quality ratings than non-profit and public centres." (Child Resource and Research Unit, 2011 para 3)

"In addition, auspice [program owners] predicts quality through its influence on staff wages, ECE training and other key characteristics" (Child Resource and Research Unit, 2011 para 3)

Also stated in the same document

Cleveland and Krashinsky’s 2004 analysis found that while non-profit centres do better on every measure, differences were greatest on measures and sub-scales regarding children’s personal care, use of materials, activities and teaching interactions linked to language development, teacher interactions with children, staff communication with parents and supporting the staff needs. (Child Resource and Research Unit, 2011 para 7) Research Shows... Drawbacks of Non-Profit Don't always have funds for extras
New toys
Latest technology
Reliant on government funding Other Benefits of Non-Profit Daycare Subsidies available
Competitive wages & Benefits ( ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( (
Child Care Canada. (n.d.). Homepage. Retrieved from http://childcarecanada.org/

Child Care Information. (n.d.). Homepage. Retrieved from http://www.childcareinformation.ca/cwlj-e.html

ChildCare.net. (n.d.). Profit or non-profit child care.. Retrieved from http://www.childcare.net/library/profitnon.shtml

Child Care Resource and Research Unit. (2011, November 16). What research says about quality in for-profit, non-profit and public child care. Retrieved from http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/11/11/what-research-says-about-quality-profit-non-profit-and-publ

YMCA of Greater Toronto. (2011, September). YMCA parent handbook [brochure]. Toronto, Ontario: Author.

YMCA of Greater Toronto. (n.d.). YMCA playing to learn [brochure]. Retrieved from http://www.ymcagta.org/en/files/PDF/Play_To_Learn07.pdf References
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