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OTHELLO:

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beatrice zemin

on 27 March 2014

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Transcript of OTHELLO:

OTHELLO:
William Shakespeare

Act 1

ACT II
The final act
Othello enters Desdemona's bedroom
A general view...
Othello
Iago
Cassio
Desdemona
Roderigo
Brabantio
Emilia
ACT I...
ACT II...

Desdemona. Who's there? Othello?
Othello. Ay. Desdemona.
Desdemona. Will you come to bed, my lord?
Othello. Have you pray'd to-night, Desdemona?
Desdemona. Ay, my lord.
Othello
. If you bethink yourself of any crime
Unreconciled as yet to heaven and grace,
Solicit for it straight.
Desdemona. Alas, my lord, what do you mean by that?
Othello. Well, do it, and be brief; I will walk by:
I would not kill thy unprepared spirit;
No; heaven forfend!
I would not kill thy soul
.
Desdemona. Talk you of killing?
Othello. Ay, I do.
Desdemona. Then heaven
Have mercy on me!

Desdemona.
I will so. What's the matter?

Othello
. That handkerchief which I so loved and gave thee

Thou gavest to Cassio.


Desdemona.
No, by my life and soul!
Send for the man, and ask him.

Othello.
By heaven,
I saw my handkerchief in's hand.

O perjured woman! thou dost stone my heart,
And makest me call what I intend to do
A murder, which I thought a sacrifice:
I saw the handkerchief.

Desdemona
. He found it then;

I never gave it him
: send for him hither;
Let him confess a truth.

Othello
. He hath confess'd.

Desdemona
. What, my lord?

Othello.

That he hath used thee.

Othello: cheated by Iago
Iago is unmasked...
[IAGO offers to stab EMILIA]

Gratiano
.
Fie! Your sword upon a woman?

Emilia
. O thou dull Moor! that handkerchief thou speak'st of

I found by fortune and did give my husband;
For often, with a solemn earnestness,
More than indeed belong'd to such a trifle,


He begg'd of me to steal it
.



Iago
.
Villanous whore!
Emilia. She give it Cassio! no, alas! I found it,
And I did give't my husband.
Iago.
Filth, thou liest!

Emilia.
You told a lie, an odious, damned lie;
Upon my soul, a lie, a wicked lie.
She false with Cassio!—did you say with Cassio?

Iago.
With Cassio, mistress. Go to, charm your tongue.

Emilia.
I will not charm my tongue; I am bound to speak:
My mistress here lies murder'd in her bed,—
...And kill his wife
Othello.
I am not valiant neither
,
But ever puny whipster gets my sword:
But
why should honour outlive honesty?
Let it go all.

Emilia. (singing) Willow, willow, willow,—
Moor, she was chaste; she loved thee, cruel Moor;
So come my soul to bliss, as I speak true;
So speaking as I think, I die, I die.
Othello stabbed Iago and then kill himself.
ACT III
ACT V
ACT IV





Desdemona
. O heavy ignorance! Thou praisest the worst best.
But what praise couldst thou bestow on a deserving
woman indeed, one that, in the authority of her
merit, did justly put on the vouch of very malice itself?


Iago
. She that was ever fair and never proud,
Had tongue at will and yet was never loud,
Never lack'd gold and yet went never gay,
Fled from her wish and yet said 'Now I may,'
She that being anger'd, her revenge being nigh,
Bade her wrong stay and her displeasure fly,
She that in wisdom never was so frail
To change the cod's head for the salmon's tail;
She that could think and ne'er disclose her mind,
See suitors following and not look behind,
She was a wight, if ever such wight were,—



Desdemona.
How say you, Cassio?
Is he not a most profane and liberal counsellor?

Cassio
. He speaks home, madam:
You may relish him more in the soldier than in the scholar.

Iago.

[Aside]
He takes her by the palm: ay, well said,
whisper: with as little a web as this will I
ensnare as great a fly as Cassio. Ay, smile upon
her, do;
I will gyve thee in thine own courtship.
You say true; 'tis so, indeed: if such tricks as
these strip you out of your lieutenantry, it had 960
been better you had not kissed your three fingers so
oft, which now again you are most apt to play the
sir in. Very good; well kissed! an excellent
courtesy! 'tis so, indeed. Yet again your fingers
to your lips? would they were clyster-pipes for your sake!
[Trumpet within]
The Moor! I know his trumpet.

Cassio
. 'Tis truly so.

Desdemona
. Let's meet him and receive him.

Cassio
. Lo, where he comes!
[Enter OTHELLO and Attendants]


Othello
. O my
fair warrior
!

Desdemona
. My dear Othello!

Othello
. It gives me wonder great as my content
To see you here before me. O my soul's joy!
If after every tempest come such calms,
May the winds blow till they have waken'd death!
And let the labouring bark climb hills of seas
Olympus-high and duck again as low
As hell's from heaven!
If it were now to die,
'Twere now to be most happy; for, I fear,
My soul hath her content so absolute
That not another comfort like to this
Succeeds in unknown fate
.




Desdemona
.
The heavens forbid
But that our loves and comforts should increase,
Even as our days do grow!



Othello
. Amen to that, sweet powers!
I cannot speak enough of this content;
It stops me here; it is too much of joy:


And this, and this, the greatest discords be
[Kissing her]
That e'er our hearts shall make!


Iago
. [Aside] O, you are
well tuned
now!
But
I'll set down the pegs
that make this music,
As
honest
as I am.
Othello
. I kiss'd thee ere I kill'd thee: no way but this;
Killing myself, to die upon a kiss.
Emilia gives voice to the audience
Othello considers himself (and is considered) a criminal.
Cassio

Desdemona
talks with
persuades
Othello
to reinstate Cassio
Iago

Emilia
to steal the handkerchief
asks
Iago
and
Roderigo
Brabantio
that
inform
had to accept their marriage
plans his revenge
IMPORTANT DEVICES

to express feelings and thoughts to the pubblic
Soliloquy:
Aside:
to speak about one of the character to the pubblic
DRAMATIC IRONY
Iago's misogyny
Iago's aside: dramatic irony
The apogee of happiness
Iago's plan
Why does Othello behave like this?
lack of intellect
his background influences him
racism
it is a personal problem --> Jealousy
so:
the last words of othello: [lines 3728-29]
Full transcript