Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Pathos, Ethos, and Logos

No description
by

Megan Howard

on 18 July 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Pathos, Ethos, and Logos

Pathos, Ethos, and Logos
&
Academic Arguments

PATHOS: EMOTIONAL ARGUMENTS
PROS:
personal connections
empathy
sustain arguments
CONS
heightened emotions
loss credibility

HUMOR
talk about difficult issues
relaxes listener


ETHOS: ARGUMENTS BASED ON CHARACTER
LOGOS: ARGUMENTS BASED ON FACTS
EVIDENCE:
artistic proofs
inartistic proofs
FACTS:
framing
credibility
compelling
STATISTICS:
interpretation
checked
SURVEYS AND POLLS:
will of the people
diverse population pool
TESTIMONIES AND NARRATIVES:
court cases
personal narratives
Academic Discourse
or
Academic Argument
Characteristics
It is based on research and uses evidence that can be documented.
It is written for a professional, academic, or school audience that is likely to know something about its topic.
It makes a clear and compelling point in a formal, objective, and often technical style.
It follows agreed upon conventions of format, usage, and punctuation.
It is documented using some professional citation style.
Developing an
Academic Argument
Choose a topic you want to explore in depth.

Get to know the conversation surrounding your topic.

Assess what you know and what you need to know.

Come up with a claim about your topic.
Consider your rhetorical stance and purpose.

Reporter Stance
-provide all of the available information and draw conclusions from it

Critic Stance
-point out the problems and mistakes associated with your topic

Advocator Stance
-provide all of the information that backs a certain view point

Think about your audience.
Concentrate on the material you are gathering.

Summarize its main points.

Analyze how these points are pertinent.

Evaluate the quality of the supporting evidence.

Synthesize the results of your analysis and evaluation.

Summarize what you think about the article.

Take special care with your documentation.
Think about your organization
Abstract

Formal introduction of the topic, a clear statement of the thesis, or a hypothesis

Review of literature

Methods of research

Report of findings

Charts & graphs to report data

Headings and subheadings

List of references
Consider style and jargon.
Use clarity and directness

Use denotative rather than connotative language

Be Impersonal

Use the passive voice when necessary

Use technical language, symbols, and abbreviations, for efficiency

Avoid colloquialisms, slang, and contractions

Consider design and visuals.

Reflect on your draft and get responses.

Edit and Proofread your text.

REASON AND COMMON SENSE:
deductive reasoning
toulmin argument
enthymeme
LOGICAL STRUCTURE FOR ARGUMENT:
degree
analogies
precedent
MUST BE:
trustworthy or credible
authority
clear motives
HOW TO:
likeable
self-deprecation
show beliefs and values
respect audience
Full transcript