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Exercise Metabolism Basics

KIN 416 - Berry College - Dept. of Kinesiology
by

David Elmer

on 23 February 2016

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Transcript of Exercise Metabolism Basics

Oxygen deficit
EPOC
excess post-exercise oxygen consumption
Prolonged exercise
( %VO max)
2
INTENSITY
LACTATE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
mmol/L
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
OBLA
VO max test
VO max
VO
time
intensity
Fuel Utilization
TIME (min)
-1
0
1
2
3
ENERGY REQUIREMENT of EXERCISE
TOTAL ENERGY SUPPLY
Aerobic energy supply
energy required at rest
Incremental Exercise
Lactate Threshold
2
2
2
Fuel Sources
Short-term, intense exercise
Exercise Metabolism
lag in oxygen uptake at the beginning of exercise, aka "on-kinetics"
anaerobic energy is required to make up for this
ATP-PC
Glycolysis
Aerobic
TIME
*note: this drawing is not exact, just an illustration
often divided into:
rapid
portion
2-3 min post-ex
slow
portion
> 30 min post-ex
restoration of PCr and oxygen stores
lactate clearance
increased HR and breathing
elevated hormones
increased body temperature
energy comes from ATP-PC system or glycolysis
depends on the length of the activity
1-5 sec
ATP-PC
5-60 sec
though all 3 are active
Glycolysis
(primarily)
2-3 min
50/50 glycolysis and aerobic
when going "all out"
hot/humid environment
high relative work rate
steady-state of oxygen consumption can normally be maintained, unless...
primarily due to rising body temperature, hormones, and VO "slow component"
Intensity
Duration
Fat/Carbohydrate Dependence
at low intensities (e.g. 30% VO max), fats are the primary fuel source
2
at higher intensities (e.g. 70% VO max), carbohydrates are the primary fuel source
2
increased rate of glycolysis
more epinephrine, which stimulates glycogen breakdown
crossover point
prolonged exercise results in a shift toward a greater use of fats
results in increased activity
breaks down triglycerides into free fatty acids
lipase
reduces insulin, which usually inhibits lipolysis
more lactate produced, inhibiting fat breakdown
glycogen stores become a problem during exercise longer than 1-2 hours
results in fatigue
reduction in Krebs cycle intermediates
reduction in fat metabolism
"fats burn in the flame of carbohydrates"
Carbohydrates
Fats
Protein
Lactate
lactate can be removed from the blood by "slow-twitch," highly-aerobic fibers
Lactate
pyruvate
acetyl-CoA
Krebs cycle
lactate can also be converted to glucose in the liver
Cori cycle
onset of blood lactate accumulation
The intensity at which blood lactate levels reach
4
mmol/L
formerly the "anaerobic threshold"
rate of glycolysis continues to increase at increasing intensities
increased recruitment of "fast" fibers with isozyme with greater pyruvate lactate affinity
LDH
increased lactate and decreased lactate
production
removal
good predictor of aerobic performance ability
useful for exercise prescription
(only about 20% of the lactate is removed this way)
increased glucose uptake in muscle
decreased fat translocation
if beta-oxidation is able to meet ATP demands, it will inhibit rate-limiting steps of glycolysis
2
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