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History of the Marine NCO

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on 8 June 2015

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Transcript of History of the Marine NCO

Modern Marines that Continue to Honor The NCO's of the Past
The Significance Of the NCO Blood Stripe
NCO Creed
The History of the Marine NCO
The Building of the Backbone
The History of the Marine NCO
The Origins of the Non-Commissioned Officer Role
ORGINS OF THE MARINE NCO

Marines NCO’s That Showed Exemplary Actions Under Extreme Conditions
While serving with the 2nd Marine Division, Cpl Corbin demonstrated extraordinary courage and initiative. Due to his outstanding display of leadership, in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, no Marines from his platoon lost their life after the initial attack.


Cpl Corbin was awarded the Navy Cross for extraordinary heroism
Cpl Corbin's team, a quick reaction force (QRF), was responding to a call. A platoon from their battalion was under attack with injured Marines. Suddenly, a vehicle, laden with IEDs, sped toward the convoy and blew up between two of the Humvees. Another blast followed as enemy fighters began firing upon the group.
With decisiveness, Cpl Corbin took immediate control, repositioning his vehicle between the insurgents' fire and the wounded Marines, radioed in the situation, and began directing a counterattack while under fire. Running through the line of fire, Cpl Corbin grabbed his wounded patrol leader, threw him over his shoulder, and sprinted back to his Humvee, while firing at the enemy as he ran. Cpl Corbin ran back and forth several times through the kill zone, moving everyone he could, out of the line of fire.


Marines NCO’s That Showed Exemplarity Actions Under Extreme Conditions

While serving with the 2nd Marine Division in the al-Askari District of al-Fallujah, Cpl Clairday demonstrated decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty.
Upon entering a fortified house full of insurgents, Cpl Clairday was immediately hit with enemy AK-47 rifle fire in both legs, and fell into the kill zone. Under heavy enemy fire, he continued to aggressively engage the enemy, while extracting himself from the doorway. Without regard for his own wounds, he unselfishly rejoined the squad, making entry, and entered the house a second time. Once inside, he took control of the squad and repositioned himself in the front, while suppresing the enemy using fragmentation grenades and his rifle. Again, without concern for his own safety, Cpl Clairday led the Marines into the room, where he single-handedly attacked the insurgents and received mortal wounds. His courageous actions enabled reinforcing assault elements to destroy the insurgent position.



Cpl Clairday was awarded the Navy Cross for extraordinary heroism
While conducting a security sweep in the al-Askari District of al-Fallujah, a platoon-sized insurgent force engaged 3rd Platoon. Cpl Clairday immediately repositioned his men and jumped a four-foot gap, three stories up onto the roof of the enemy stronghold, where a mortally wounded Marine lay, isolated by the enemy. After throwing several fragmentation grenades, Cpl Clairday fiercely led the attack into the house.


While serving as a fire team leader of Company A, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division (reinforced), in action against enemy forces in Korea, Cpl Champagne demonstrated valiant leadership, endurance, and a gallant spirit of unselfishness in the face of almost certain death. His efforts undoubtedly saved the lives of several of his fellow Marines.
When the enemy counterattack increased in intensity, and a hostile grenade landed in the midst of the fire team, Cpl Champagne unhesitatingly seized the deadly missile and hurled it in the direction of the approaching enemy. As the grenade left his hand, it exploded, blowing off his hand and throwing him out of the trench.


Cpl Champagne was awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity, above and beyond the call of duty.

While serving with the 3rd Marine Division at the Battle of Iwo Jima, Cpl Williams displayed extraordinary heroism in the face of ruthless enemy resistance. His actions were directly instrumental in neutralizing one of the most fanatically defended Japanese strong points encountered by his regiment. Additionally, Cpl Williams' initiative was significant in his company's achievement of their objective.


Cpl Pruitt was awarded two Medals of Honor; one from the U.S. Army, and one from the U.S. Navy,
for extraordinary gallantry and intrepidity, above and beyond the call of duty.
Cpl Pruitt was awarded one Medal of Honor by the Navy and one Medal of Honor by the Army.
While serving with the 2nd Marine Division on October 3, 1918, at the Battle of Blanc Mont Ridge, France, Cpl Pruitt displayed initiative and courage, and as a result, saved many lives and ensured the success of his unit's mission.
During the battle, Cpl Pruitt spotted two enemy machine gun nests. Quickly recognizing the danger to his Marines and other American soldiers in the area, he single-handedly attacked with decisiveness, and captured the two machine guns, and 40 enemy prisoners, in a nearby dugout.






Significance Of the NCO Blood Stripe

During the battle, American tanks maneuvered to open a lane for the infantry through the network of reinforced concrete pillboxes, buried mines, and black volcanic sands. Cpl Williams went forward alone to attempt the reduction of devastating machine gun fire from the unyielding positions. Covered only by four riflemen, Cpl Williams demonstrated significant endurance by fighting for four hours under terrific enemy small arms fire. He repeatedly returned to his own lines to prepare demolition charges and obtain serviced flamethrowers. He fought his way back to the rear of hostile emplacements to wipe out one position after another.
On one occasion, he daringly mounted a pillbox to insert the nozzle of his flamethrower through the air vent, killing the occupants and silencing the gun; on another he courageously charged enemy riflemen who attempted to stop him with bayonets, and destroyed them with a burst of flame from his weapon.


While advancing with his platoon against a strongly fortified and heavily defended hill position, Cpl Champagne skillfully led his fire team through a hail of intense enemy machine gun, small arms, and grenade fire, overrunning trenches and a series of almost impregnable bunker positions. He suffered a painful leg wound while assisting in repelling the ensuing hostile counterattack, which was launched under cover of a murderous hail of mortar and artillery fire, but steadfastly refused evacuation and courageously continued to control his fire team.
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