Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

"Boy" by Roald Dahl SOW

SOW Boy. Roald Dahl. KS3 SOW. Boy by Roald Dahl.
by

K Robinson

on 1 October 2018

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of "Boy" by Roald Dahl SOW

What is the difference between
Biography
and
Autobiography
?
Lesson 9
Image by Tom Mooring
Lesson 7
Visiting Norway
About Roald Dahl...
Can you make some notes about Roald Dahl's life?
A tuck-box is a small pinewood trunk which is very strongly made, and no boy has ever gone as a boarder to an English Prep School without one. It is his own secret storehouse, as secret as a lady’s handbag, and there is an unwritten law that no other boy, no teacher, not even the Headmaster himself has the right to pry into the contents of your tuck-box. The owner has the key in his pocket and that is where it stays.
As well as tuck, a tuck-box would also contain all manner of treasures such as a magnet, a pocket-knife, a compass, a ball of string, a clockwork racing-car, half-a-dozen lead soldiers, a box of conjuring-tricks, some tiddly-winks, a Mexican jumping bean, a catapult, some foreign stamps, a couple of stink-bombs, and I remember one boy called Arkle who drilled an airhole in the lid of his tuck-box and kept a pet frog in there which he fed on slugs.
Lesson 1
Lesson 2
Different types of sentence...
Both terms 'Biography' and Autobiography'
have their origins in Greek words
AUTO
meaning
'Self'
BIO
meaning

'Life'
GRAPHY
meaning

'I write'
Time based sentence starters...
Later
Earlier
After
Before
When
Can you think of anymore?
Experienced writers use a variety of sentences to make their writing interesting and lively.
Too many simple sentences, for example, will sound choppy and immature.
Too many long sentences will be difficult to read and hard to understand.
Simple Sentences
– Contain a subject and a verb.
The sun shines brightly.
The children play football on the beach.
Compound Sentences

– Contain a subject, a verb and a conjunction.
The sun was shining, so the people got burnt.
The seagulls sang as the sea came in.
COMPLEX SENTENCES
also use
conjunctions
but they don't just divide into neat, complete, simple sentences if you take out the conjunctions.
In complex sentences you link a
MAIN CLAUSE
with a
SUBORDINATE CLAUSE.
The
MAIN CLAUSE
makes sense on its own but the
SUBORDINATE CLAUSE
doesn't!
Thailand flourishes in March
,

although

it rains in August.

Main clause
(complete, short sentence)
Conjuction
Subordinate clause
(doesn't make sense on its own
While

the breeze blew
,

people flew colourful kites.
Main clause
(complete, short sentence)
Conjunction
(Yes, it can go at the start of the sentence!)
Subordinate Clause
(makes no sense on its own)
Comma
(always separates
the clauses)
Comma
(always separates
the clauses)
Lesson 3
What sweets do you enjoy? Why?
Can you use the five senses
to help your descriptive writing?
Antonyms are words that mean the opposite of other words.

Good/Bad
Big/Small

Synonyms are words that share meanings with other words.

Happy/Jolly/Cheerful
Excited/Thrilled/Ecstatic

Using
antonyms
and
synonyms
makes
your writing more interesting...
Lesson 4/5
Planning for extended writing tasks...
Lesson 6
What would you have
in a tuck box?

Sour as a green
gooseberry...
Black with
dirt and grime...
What impression do you have
of Mrs. Pratchett?
skinny old hag...
Can you create a horrible description of someone?

STEP ONE
Decide who... they must be invented by you and not someone real...
The filthy chef
at a restaurant?
The snobby waiter?
The grumpy librarian?
STEP TWO
Think of
FIVE
things you can write about them.
These will help you to break your writing up into at least
5
sections...
Face
Describe how they look.
Voice
Describe how they sound - use some speech!
Clothes
Clean/dirty
Neat/Untidy
Mannerisms
How they walk, if they point or squint...
Surroundings
What is their workplace like?
Are they keeping it clean?
STEP THREE
Think about all of the work that we have done on vocabulary.
Think of at least
SEVEN
amazing words that fit your description.
This is your chance to show how you can be ambitious with your writing...
Despicable
Arrogant
No more examples - now it's your turn....
STEP FOUR
Now think of at least FIVE language devices that you can use to engage and interest your reader.

Don't limit yourself to five - pack in as many as you can! And once you have identified them, you can use each one more than once!
Emotive language
Alliteration
Similes
Metaphors
List of three
Come on - you name some more...
You can plan in a spidergram, bulletpoints, lists...

You find what works best for you.
Once your planning is complete, you have 30 minutes to write your description....
You must write AT LEAST ONE FULL SIDE in your books...
Think about
sentence structure
and
vocabulary
.
Remember
SPaG
.
Good luck!
AF3

Identify layers of meaning, with some detailed exploration

Comments consider how details contribute to overall meaning

AF2

Relevant points identified from across the text

Comments use quotations to support argument

THIS IS ALL ABOUT READING!
Can you create a point that belongs with this evidence:
They all started grinning. They slapped me on the back. They cheered me and danced around the classroom.
We felt like a gang of desperados setting out to rob a train or blow up the sheriff’s office.
Can you find some evidence for these points:
Mrs Pratchett seems like a witch to the boys.
Mrs Pratchett is a very rude woman.
Mrs Pratchett is dirty and unhygienic.

Starter
Do the boys seem like a rowdy gang?

How does Dahl uses the senses here?

What might the boys be thinking?
How does this contrast to the boys earlier attitude?

What do you notice about the sentence lengths?

All of a sudden we had begun to feel slightly uncomfortable.
There was something not quite right about the shop being closed. Even Thwaites was unable to offer a reasonable explanation. We became silent. There was a faint scent of danger in the air now. Each one of us had caught a whiff of it. Alarm bells were beginning to ring faintly in our ears.

Atmosphere
conveys
emphasises

indicates

implies

gives us the impression that

suggests

highlights

The writer …
evokes

POINT
EVIDENCE
BUT IT WILL
ALSO HELP
YOUR WRITING
What is a coordinating conjunction?
A coordinating conjunction is a word which joins together two clauses which are both equally important.
It was raining
, so
I took my umbrella
.
Both are complete clauses which contain a subject and a verb. They could be complete sentences on their own!
Subject
Verb
The two clauses in the sentence are joined together with the word
“so”
. This is a coordinating conjunction. A coordinating conjunction usually comes in the middle of a sentence, and it usually follows a comma (unless both clauses are very short).

These are the most important coordinating conjunctions:
REMEMBER:
Coordinating conjunctions create
compound sentences
because they join two equally important clauses!
Can you identify the subject and the verb in these compound sentences?
These conjunctions are also used:

nor (joining two negative alternatives)
for (meaning “because”)
yet (meaning “but”)
After reading about Roald Dahl’s adventures in Norway, design a poster advertising Norway as a summer holiday destination. Include details such as:

• It’s an idyllic place and you’ll receive a warm welcome (include the skaal tradition)
• The food and drink you can expect (fresh fish, home-made ice-cream and home-made liqueur)
• Day trips on the calm waters of the fjord
• Beautiful scenery
• Uninhabited islands and motor boats for rent
• Relaxing fishing trips, you can catch cod, mackerel etc.
R
E
M
E
M
B
E
R
Try to include coordinating conjunctions in your writing.
Lesson 8
Lesson 9
REMEMBER... the main clause and the subordinate clause are always separated by a comma!
Lesson 11
Fiction
Non- Fiction
Language Devices
Features of magazine article
Lesson 12
Language Device Questions
Emotive language
Bad or Despicable?
List of three
THINK OF SOME MORE!
present information and ideas about a topic
present a point of view about the topic
layout: headlines, subheadings, pictures
all paragraphs relate to the main idea of the passage
the main idea is introduced early on in the passage and then developed in subsequent paragraphs
straightforward language
usually written in the past tense
information could be divided into sections
Lesson 13
Look at the two extracts...
Compare how they present teachers who had served in the war.

Comparative and Contrasting Conjunctions
Comparative Conjunctions link two ideas that are the same or similar.
Similarly, likewise, in the same way, also
Comparative Conjunctions link two ideas that are opposed or different.
but, however, in contrast, on the contrary, instead, nevertheless, yet, still, even so, neither … nor
P
OINT-
E
VIDENCE-
E
XPLANATION
When you explain how a writer uses words and language effectively, you should use P E E.
P
= the
POINT
you are making or
the idea that you have
E
E
= your
EVIDENCE
, which will be
a
QUOTE
from the text.
= your
EXPLANATION
of how
the
EVIDENCE
proves your
POINT
Think about the question
'How does Roald Dahl feel about Matron'
?
Roald Dahl feels afraid of matron,
he describes her as a 'terrible ogre'
this suggests that he sees her as a frightening monster, and shows he is afraid.
POINT
EVIDENCE
EXPLANATION
HIGHLIGHT OR UNDERLINE five words or phrases that tell you how Dahl feels about matron
ALWAYS ANNOTATE (MAKE NOTES) next the the parts you highlight!
He thinks she's a monster.
Metaphor.
Matron is in
charge.
DON'T USE THESE - FIND YOUR OWN!
Lesson 14
Can you analyse a newspaper article?
Who do you think this is?
Full transcript