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Prenatal Development

Psy 235
by

Leslie Uribevivar

on 23 September 2014

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Transcript of Prenatal Development

Prenatal Development
Focus on these essential nutrients
Foods to avoid
Viral STDs can't be treated but symptoms can be managed with medication
Premature labor is a common and serious effect of maternal stress
Screening and treating pregnant women for STDs is a vital way to prevent serious health complications to both mother and baby that may otherwise happen with infection. The sooner a woman begins receiving medical care during pregnancy, the better the health outcomes will be for herself and her unborn baby.
Stress can have severe effects on both the expecting mother and her child. It is crucial during all stages of pregnancy to find ways to reduce and manage one's stress levels.
Work
Financial crisis
Drug abuse (Withdrawal)
Domestic violence
Traumatic experiences
Preexisting psychiatric disorders (i.e. anxiety, depression)
Common Stressors:
What you should and shouldn't do
NUTRITION
Eating well balanced meals is important at all times, but it is even more essential when you are pregnant. Good nutrition is crucial to a developing child.
Folate and folic acid
Prevent birth defects (leafy vegetables)

Calcium — Strengthen bones (milk, yogurt)

Protein — Promote growth (lentils, cooked eggs)

Iron — Prevent anemia (iron-fortified quick oats)

Supplements — Ask your health care provider




STRESS
Effects of Stress:
Poor Nutrition
High BP (Increased cortisol levels
Premature delivery, lower blood supply to placenta)
Low birth weight
Prolonged labor (As with the case of major depression)
How Drugs Effect the Baby
Is it safe to take illegal drugs while I'm pregnant?
Why Alcohol Hurts
Common STDs:
Pregnant women who are adequately nourished are more likely to deliver healthy babies
Raw or undercooked meat and seafood - listeria, and salmonella. Blood poisoning.

Soft Cheeses and Unpasteurized Milk– Listeria. Can cause miscarriage.

Too many frozen prepared meals and fast food – saturated with salt and fat.

Sodas – Empty calories

Malnutrition and Obesity
Malnutrition during pregnancy has been linked to:
Low birth weight
Prematurity
Retardation of brain development
Cognitive problems
Maternal obesity is linked with:
Stillbirth
Neural Tube defects
Gestational diabetes

Health Problems During
Pregnancy
Food Guide
Healthy, well balanced diet
Refraining from alcohol/nicotine during and before pregnancy
Adequate sleep
Exercise (Yoga, meditation)
Communication (w/ doctor and partner)
Counseling
Relaxing hobby/ activity
Soothing Music

Ways to Reduce Stress:
Should Pregnant Women Be Tested for STDs?
Can STDs Be Treated During Pregnancy?
Some STD infections can be treated with antiviral medications or other preventive measures to reduce the risk of passing the infection to the baby.

If a woman is pregnant or considering pregnancy she should be tested so she can take steps to protect herself and her baby.
Syphilis
Gonorrhea
Chlamydia
AIDs
Herpes

Common Treatments:
Antibiotics
Antiretroviral Drugs (HIV/AIDs)
Anti-Inflammatory Creams
Caleb Johnson
Conrad Patterson
Leslie Fuentes
Michala Flowers
Nina Southers
What Alcohol May Do To Your Baby
Whether your pregnancy was meticulously planned, medically coaxed, or happened by surprise, one thing is certain – your life will never be the same. Enjoy the journey.
Group Members:
For some drugs the evidence is clear, for others less so. But we know enough to be sure that illegal drugs in pregnancy must always be considered unsafe, even in small amounts. If a parent has drug problems it affects their child at every stage, from pregnancy onwards.
Drugs in the mother's body may reduce the oxygen supply to the baby which may stunt fetal growth.
With many drugs, the baby may experience withdrawal-like symptoms.
Maternal drug use may also affect how well the placenta works.
There is an increased risk of placental abruption, a life threatening condition where the placenta detaches from the side of the uterus, sometimes causing severe bleeding.
Abnormal Facial Features
Small Head Size
Low body Weight
Speech and Language slowness
Sleep and sucking problems as a baby
Problems with heart, Kidney, or bones
Alcohol in the mothers blood passes to the baby through the umbilical cord. Drinking can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, and a range of lifelong physical disabilities.
Mothers Health Issues Before Pregnancy That can Effect Pregnancy
Asthma
Depression
Diabetes
Eating Disorders
Epilepsy and other seizure disorders
Obesity
Migraines
High Blood Pressure
Thyroid Disease
Anemia
Depression
Extopic Pregnancy
Fetal problems
Gestational Diabetes
Hyperemesis Gravidarum
Miscarriage
Placenta previa
Placental Abruption
Preeclampsia
Preterm Labor
How Obesity can affect
A Mothers Pregnancy

Obesity can affect a mothers pregnancy in many
different ways whether it be the child having neck and spinal dysfunction in the earlier stages of pregnancy.
With the mother being over weight it increases the chance of the child to have heart problems by 15 percent.

Women who are obese
are more likely to have gestational diabetes.
With this in mind if the mother has this disease then the child is more likely to be obese and have type 2 diabetes
Pregnant women should try to avoid foods that are more likely to carry food-borne illnesses such as: eggs, sushi, some fishes, etc...
Some foods such as cured meats, bacon, sausage, ham are okay to be consumed but should not be eating in excess.

Women are also advised to lay back on the caffeine and only drink in smaller quantities. Also some cheeses should not be consumed because of the listeria found in them.
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