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Adleman- 505- Ideological Stance Product

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Lindsey Adleman

on 19 November 2012

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Transcript of Adleman- 505- Ideological Stance Product

Lindsey Adleman
USC: Rossier School of Education
EDUC 505: Intergrating Literacy in Secondary Content Instruction
Dr. Carbone
November 18, 2012 Ideological Stance Product Ideoloogical Stance Lesson Overview My ideological stance for social science/ history is that students should be given the tools to make decisions and sense of the subject based on reason, empathy, and consequences. Reasoning, for history, is based on evidence. Students must learn how to research and persuade as history mostly non-factual but based on evidence. In terms of empathy, students can bring their funds of knowledge to the classroom and identify multiple perspectives in order to grasp how perspective and humanity can change the course of history (this also becomes a building block for democratic citizenship). Lastly, consequences are important to comprehend because, whether the consequences are positive or negative, consequences are the foundations for big ideas in history. One example of how I would implement my ideological stance in the classroom is by using multiple sources because, as I stated previously, multiple perspectives and research are key to empathizing with multiple perspectives, reasoning through research and persuasion, and understanding that consequences of the same event can have different meanings depending on the perspective. Since sources can be challenging, I would use literacy strategies such as graphic organizers so that students can track the big ideas of the sources. The lesson plan chosen to illustrate my ideological stance is a Group Investigation lesson. The lesson will have an objective that reflects a thinking skill, content, and multiple resources that all students will utilize, however, in order to integrate equity and access to students of different abilities, the product that students will produce and be assessed on will vary. Lesson Plan: Group Investigation Objective: Students will be able to determine the relevance and the functions of the New Deal on US society by using informational texts and writings and create a product to illustrate their findings and opinions. Standard: 11.6 Students analyze the different explanations for the Great Depression and how the New Deal fundamentally changed the role of the federal government using multiple sources. My ideological stance stems from my experiences, prior knowledge, pedagogy class (EDUC 541A), and class on framing the social context of high needs schools (EDUC 516). My thoughts on students sharing or bringing their funds of knowledge to class is based on the research of Moll, Amanti, Neff, & Gonzalez (2005) and Moje, Ciechanowski, Kramer, Ellis, Carrillo, & Collazo (2004), which were read and discussed in EDUC 516. Funds of knowledge, which is defined by Moll, Amanti, Neff, & Gonzalez (2005 ) as “historically accumulate and culturally developed bodies of knowledge and skills essential for individual functioning and well being” (p. 72), allow students to relate to the material and empathize. My view on consequence, reasons, and empathy as some of the most important factors in teaching history are based on EDUC 541A reading from Lee (Donovan & Bransford, 2005) who states cause, evidence, accounts, time, change, and empathy are the “concepts that give shape to the discipline of history” (p. 41) and explains that “learning history means paying attention to details and to contexts” (p. 65). I think Lee’s concepts to learning history can be found in empathy, consequences, and reasoning. I believe the “science” and art of teaching are go hand in hand. The art of teaching is accommodating lessons to the students needs. For example, students might need visual aids as a tool to understand material, help to recall information, assist in the imagining process of reading. Incorporating visual aids into the lesson is the art of teaching, or pedagogy, which is supported by theory or “science” of teaching, in this case, the cognitive theory would support the use of visual aids as a learning strategy. This class will consist of gifted, learning disabled, English language learners (ELs), and the average learner. Present Puzzlement: Teacher will present a picture of people building infrastructures as part of the New Deal's Work Project Administration.
Questioning: Students will develop questions about the photo, these question will become the prompts for the inquiry groups.
Research: In groups, students will examine and judge multiple sources in order to answer the questions developed earlier in the class.
Share and Summarize: Students will share their answers with the class using a retrieval chart.
Products:
Gifted students will create a proposal of economic solutions for the FDR adminstration by identifying the problems that the Great Depression created for the U.S. and formulate three solutions for the problem (one solution to please those who want a free market economy, one solution that is pro-socialism, and one solution that has a mixure of a free market economy and socialist economy by using multiple sources to support their proposal.
EL students will create a cartoon in which they illustrate the challenges Americans faced during the Great Depression by drawing pictures and using brief statements to explain what they drew and why. They will be given scaffolds, like sentence frames, to use for assistance.
Learning disability students who have low self-efficacy for academic tasks and general delays in cognitice and social functioning, the teacher will "scaffold students' efforts on academic tasks to increase the probability of success" (Ormrod, 2011, p.353)
The average students will compose an essay in which they compare and contrast the government solutions for the Depression in the U.S. and in Germany. Products:
Gifted students will create a proposal of economic solutions for the FDR adminstration by identifying the problems that the Great Depression created for the U.S. and formulate three solutions for the problem (one solution to please those who want a free market economy, one solution that is pro-socialism, and one solution that has a mixure of a free market economy and socialist economy by using multiple sources to support their proposal.
EL students will create a cartoon in which they illustrate the challenges Americans faced during the Great Depression by drawing pictures and using brief statements to explain what they drew and why. They will be given scaffolds, like sentence frames, to use for assistance.
Learning disability students who have low self-efficacy for academic tasks and general delays in cognitice and social functioning, the teacher will "scaffold students' efforts on academic tasks to increase the probability of success" (Ormrod, 2011, p.353)
The average students will compose an essay in which they compare and contrast the government solutions for the Depression in the U.S. and in Germany. Ideological Stance Theme #1: Empathy Sources will include photos of people out of work (waiting in line for free food and drinks) and writings, such as journals of those affected by nature disasters (dust bowls). Sources like these will permit students who have experienced natural disasters (like earthquakes) or having a hard time finding jobs to share their funds of knowledge. Additionally, these sources reveal hard times and situations students would not like to experience which are chosen specifically to allow opportunities for students to empathize and sympathize with the people and situations. Ideological Stance Theme#3: Consequences Empathy for Moral and Prosocial Development "Encouraging Moral and Prosocial development in the classroom [...] encourages perspective taking, empathy, and prosocial behaviors" (Ormrod, 2011, p. 97)
This particular lesson utilizes the learning strategy "engage students in discussions of moral issues related to academic subject matter" (Ormrod, 2011, p. 99) Ideological Stance Theme #2: Reasoning As the lesson requires students to answer open ended questions based on multiple sources, with multiple perspectives, students must probe the material and evaluate the big ideas and generate a stance on the subject. In order to defend their stance and big idea, the students will persuade the class and the teacher during the retrieval chart activity and in their product. The skills to research, analyze, and persuade must be exercised often for students to facilitate students to reason in history as well as other subjects and real world situations. Many students will need to assistance of a scaffold in order to practice reasoning skills until they are able to reason without help. For this lesson, graphic organizers will be used as scaffolds. For this lesson, students will use Argument Evidence Double-Entry Reading Logs (Vacca, Vacca, & Mraz, 2011, p. 342) to identify the main ideas and views of the sources and use evidence to support their views and where in the source they found the big idea. Vacca, Vacca, & Mraz (2011) suggest using trade books to explore "different points of view toward historical events [because] trade books can offer perspectives beyond [the] textbook" (p. 376). The teacher can lead the class in a read aloud because the experience can "hold students' interest, stimulate discussion, reflect authors from many cultures, and match the social and emotional levels of the listener" (Erickson as quoted in Vacca, Vacca, & Mraz, 2011, p. 383). Why students learn history is a difficult question to answer as the subject history has many variables. I think understanding cause and effect, or consequences, is a major element of the subject. It has been said that people learn history so that history is not repeated, this statement reflects the skills of identifying events and prediciting and confirming consequences. This skill can roll over to real world situations as students can take these skills and apply them to their everyday decisions by using historical events as support and evidence to their own decision making. The teacher can prepare a Chain of Events graphic organizer, which is a t-chart organized on the left side of the chart naming key events of the event, or "story chain" and text predictions on the right. Students can develop their critical thinking skills by making predictions on what the consequences were based on the title of an event. Students will then have to research using the multiple sources to confirm their predictions (Vacca, Vacca, & Mraz, 2011, p. 177) In order for students to commit the skills of reasoning to long term memory "learner must relate new information to things they already know" (Ormrod, 2011, p. 197). By relating new information to prior knowledge students can comprehend and understand material that they research in order to think critically, which is necessary for persuasion and reasoning. In order to understand consequences students must organize knowledge. On strategy is for the teacher to teach concepts by giving definitions, highlighting concept characteristics, presenting examples and non examples, have students generate their own examples, and show similarities and differences in concepts (Ormrod, 2011, p. 224). During the retrieval chart, summary and share phase, students are learning new concepts. Conclusion Using pedagogical practices (i.e. Group Investigation lesson plans), literacy support, and learning strategies based on theory, I can integrate my ideological stances into my classroom. These features used harmoniously can help students develop content understanding while giving equity and access to all students. References Moje, E., Ciechanowski, K. M., Kramer, K., Ellis, L., Carrillo, R., & Collazo, T. (2004). Working toward third space in content area literacy: an examination of everyday funds of knowledge and Discourse. Reading Research Quarterly, 39(1),
Moll, L., Amanti, C., Neff, D., González, N. (2005). Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. In González, N., Moll, L. C., Amanti, C. (Eds.) Funds of knowledge: Theorizing practices in households, communities, and classrooms. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Ormrod, J. E. (2011). Educational Psychology: Developing Learners (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
Vacca, R. T., Vacca, J. A. L., & Mraz, M. (2011). Content area reading, literacy and learning across the curriculum, student value edition. Allyn & Bacon.
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