Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Sea Gypsies of the Andaman Sea

No description
by

Sky Bilschmidt

on 27 April 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Sea Gypsies of the Andaman Sea

Moken children learn to swim before they walk.
The Mokens plunge to depths of 75 feet without any life support.
Their heart rates lower in order to hold their breath for twice as long as other humans. But how do they do it? At first, scientists thought that there might be some super-sighted genetic variation in play; after all, the Moken have been diving for hundreds of years. Perhaps, but Gislen's studies with European children showed some pretty cool results - after four to six months of training, Swedish youngsters would automatically constrict their pupils when they came in contact with water, though not to the extent of the Moken children, who have been practising this exercise far longer
A peaceful and nonviolent people, the Moken treat everyone as family, sharing what they have and abstaining from the accumulation of worldly possessions.

The Moken's animist beliefs led them to worship the sea and respect its power.

They know how to read the signs that the mighty ocean herself sends them, enabling them to find higher ground before anyone else knew that the 2004 Tsunami would hit. The Sea Gypsies of the Andaman Sea They may look like regular folks frolicking in the water on a hot summer's day, but they're really much more remarkable than that. They are the Moken, a group of about 2,000 to 3,000 people who are born, live and die traveling the Andaman Sea around Southern Thailand and Myanmar (Burma). Settling only during monsoon season, these "Sea Gypsies" live more than half the year in boats called kabang, each made from a single tree. They are master fishermen and expert divers, catching fish on spears with ease, while collecting a variety of other fruits of the sea by hand, such as sea cucumbers at low tide and shellfish at high tide. The Sea Gypsies of the Andaman Sea sea (cc) photo by medhead on Flickr modern
liffe They may look like regular folks frolicking in the water on a hot summer's day, but they're really much more remarkable than that. They are the Moken, a group of about 2,000 to 3,000 people who are born, live and die traveling the Andaman Sea around Southern Thailand and Myanmar (Burma). Settling only during monsoon season, these "Sea Gypsies" live more than half the year in boats called kabang, each made from a single tree. They are master fishermen and expert divers, catching fish on spears with ease, while collecting a variety of other fruits of the sea by hand, such as sea cucumbers at low tide and shellfish at high tide. The Moken are a group of about 2,000 to 3,000 people.
born, live and die traveling the Andaman Sea around Southern Thailand and Myanmar (Burma). Settling only during monsoon season, these "Sea Gypsies" live more than half the year in boats called kabang, each made from a single tree.
Master fishermen and expert divers, catching fish on spears
Collecting a variety of other fruits of the sea by hand, such as sea cucumbers at low tide and shellfish at high tide.
When asked how the Moken people knew that the tsunami would come, they speak of the Laboon, the "wave that eats people,"

A legend that has been passed down through the generations: Angry ancestral spirits bring on this "Big Wave," but before it arrives, the sea recedes.

The village headman recognized these signs before the 2004 Tsunami struck, and ran to warn everyone to move to higher ground to avoid the wave.

Only one man died

Although the Moken survived the devastating disaster of 2004, the traditional nomadic life and the knowledge of the sea could soon be lost.

Only about 1,000 Moken still lead the traditional life and the numbers continue to dwindle. What is in the water friend or foe Sea Gypsies food scraps in water fish eat food eat fish Sea Gypsies throw Sea Gypsies are
awesome!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! The end But how do they do it? At first, scientists thought that there might be some super-sighted genetic variation in play; after all, the Moken have been diving for hundreds of years. #1 #2 #3 sea gypsies speak Austronesian sea gypsies
Full transcript