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Research Design

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Stas Konnov

on 13 April 2016

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Transcript of Research Design

Research Design
Design vs. Methods?
Master Plan
The research design is a master plan specifying the methods and procedures for collecting and analyzing empirical data
Typology of research designs
1.
Purpose
- Exploratory, descriptive, casual
Purpose
Research objective - To gain background information, to define terms, to clarify problems and develop hypotheses, to establish research priorities, to develop questions to be answered
Process
Quantitative:
A
research design
provides a framework for the collection and analysis of data. Choice of research design reflects decisions about priorities given to the dimensions of the research process.
A
research method
is simply a technique for collecting data. Choice of research method reflects decisions about the type of the instruments or techniques to be used.
2.
Process
- Quantitative & Qualitative (and mixed)
3.
Outcome
- Applied or basic
4.
Logic
- Deductive or inductive
Exploratory
Research objective - To describe and measure certain phenomena at a point in time
Descriptive
Research objective - To determine casuality, test hypotheses, to make "if-then" statements, to answer questions
Casual
Purpose - Exploratory Research
Most commonly unstructured, "informal" research that is undertaken to gain background information about the general nature of the research problem
Conducted when the researcher does not know much about the problem and needs additional information or desires new or more recent information
Typical methods to conduct exploratory research
Secondary Data Analysis
Experience Surveys
Case Studies
Focus Groups
Projective Techniques
Purpose - Descriptive research
Descriptive research is undertaken to provide answers to questions of who, what, where, when and how - but not why
Two basic classifications:
Cross-sectional studies
Longitudinal studies
Cross-sectional studies
Longitudinal studies
Cross-sectional studies measure units from a sample of the population at only one point in time
Sample surveys are cross-sectional studies whose sample are drawn in such a way as to be representative of a specific population
Online survey research is being used to collect data for cross-sectional surveys at a faster rate of speed
Longitudinal studies repeatedly draw sample units of a population over time
One method is to draw different units from the same sampling frame
A second method is to use a "panel" where the same people are asked to respond periodically
Purpose - Casual research
Causality may be thought of as understanding a phenomenon in terms of conditional statements of the form "If X, then Y"
Casual relationships are typically determined by the use of experiments, but other methods are also used
Surveys
Experiments
Testing
Qualitative:
Interviews
Discourse analysis
Observation (field notes, video and audio recordings)
Text and image analysis (documents, media data)
Case-studies
Ethnographic research
Grounded theory
Mixed methods
Outcome
Basic research also called pure research or fundamental research, is scientific research aimed to improve scientific theories for improved understanding or prediction of natural or other phenomena
Applied research, in turn, examines a specific set of circumstances, and its ultimate goal is relating the results to a particular situation. That is, applied research uses the data directly for real world application
Logic
Deduction:
Theory
Hypotheses
Observation
Conclusion
Induction:
Observation
Pattern
Hypotheses
Theory
How to report your design?
At the beginning of your methodological section
Indicate the general approach of your study: purpose, process, outcome and logic
Move on to include: concrete methods for data collection and analysis
Find out more
Bono, Joyce & McNamara, Gerry (2011). From the editors, Publishing in AMJ – Part 2: Research design. Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 54, No. 4, 657–660.
Also watch the videos on:
- Research cycle
- Research questions
- Research design
- Ethics
- Writing a research report

Online survey is also an option
Full transcript