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Hera's Resume

Humphrey
by

Mikayla Humphrey

on 21 September 2015

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Transcript of Hera's Resume

Roman Equivalent: Juno
Gender: Female
Marital Status: Married to Zeus
Title: Queen of Heaven
Parents: Kronos/Rhea
Foster Parents: Oceanus/Tethys
Sacred Bird: Peacock

Hera
Experience
Origin
Birth
Early Life

Strengths & Weaknesses
Portfolio (Hera in Classical Art)
Citations:
http://zusque.deviantart.com/
https://sheffield100objects.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/james-barry-detail.jpg
http://www.greek-gods.info/greek-gods/hera/images/hera-painting-gallery.jpg
http://www.shmoop.com/hera-juno/photo-hera-1600s.html
http://www.shmoop.com/hera-juno/photo-hera-on-a-cup.html
http://www.shmoop.com/hera-juno/photo-statue-hera.html
http://zusque.deviantart.com/
http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/HeraMyths.html
Hera and her siblings are swallowed by their father Kronos, but are thrown up after Kronos ingests poison
Hera is fostered by Oceanus and Thetys
Seduced by Zeus
Marries Zeus
Later Life
Has children with Zeus
Homer described Hera’s character as one of “jealousy, obstinacy, and a quarreling disposition, which sometimes makes her own husband tremble.”
Strengths
Character
Weaknesses
Hot-tempered
Jealous
Vengeful
Leadership Ability
Loyal
Powerful
Marriage to Zeus
Birth of Hephaestus
Persecution of the Consorts of Zeus
Hera rejects Zeus’ advances
Zeus transforms into an injured cuckoo
Hera holds the bird against her chest trying to help it
Zeus transforms back to human form
Zeus rapes Hera
Hera marries Zeus out of shame
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2. 17. 4 (trans. Jones) (Greek travelogue c. 2nd A.D.):
"The presence of a cuckoo seated on the sceptre [of Hera] they explain by the story that when Zeus was in love with Hera in her maidenhood he changed himself into this bird, and she caught it to be her pet [in order to seduce her]."
Text Evidence
Zeus produces Athena without help of Hera
Hera retaliates by producing Hephasteus alone
Hephasteus is born crippled
Hera casts Hephasteus out of Olympus
Zeus rapes Callisto
Hera turns Callisto into a bear
Hera convinces Artemis to shoot the bear
Zeus gets Aphrodite pregnant
Hera curses their unborn child with a deformity
Hesiod, Theogony 921 ff (trans. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic c. 8th or c. 7th B.C.):
"Zeus gave birth from his own head to Tritogeneia [Athena] . . . Hera was very angry and quarrelled with her mate. And because of this strife she bare without union with Zeus who hold the aigis a glorious son, Hephaistos, who excelled all the sons of Heaven in crafts."
Text Evidence
Alternate Spellings
Suidas s.v. Priapos (trans. Suda On Line) (Byzantine Greek lexicon c. 10th A.D.):
"Priapos: was conceived from Zeus and Aphrodite; but Hera in a jealous rage laid hands by a certain trickery on the belly of Aphrodite and readied a shapeless and ugly and over-meaty babe to be born."
Text Evidence
Hera's Relevance Today
Hera (while asleep) was tricked into breastfeeding Heracles
Upon awakening, she pushed Heracles away and the spilled milk resulted in the Milky Way

Month of June named after Juno, Goddess of Marriage
Greek tradition was to follow in Juno's footsteps and marry in June, establishing June as the bridal month
Milky Way
June Bridal Tradition
Hera: Here
Kronos: Cronus
Hephaestus: Hephaestos, Hephæstos, Hephaistos, Hephestos, Hephaestus, Hephæstus, Hephaistus, Hephestus (US)
Athena: Athene
James Berry - 1790
Peter Lastman - 1618
Rembrandt - 1660
c. 470 B.C.
Jean-Jacques Clérion - 1887
600 B.C.
800 B.C.
Full transcript