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Copper

copper
by

Casey Spilka

on 7 January 2013

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Transcript of Copper

Melting Point: 1357.77 K (1084.62°C or 1984.32°F) Copper (Cu) Sources Boiling Point: 2835 K
(2562°C or 4644°F) Copper is a metal. History Copper was discovered in 9000 B.C. in the Middle East. By Casey Spilka More
About
Copper At room temperature copper is a solid. Density: 8.933 grams per cubic centimeter A copper pendant was found in northern Iraq that dates to 8700 BC which is the first finding of copper. It is unknown who discovered copper and how it was discovered because it has been used since ancient times. How copper got its name, is from the Latin word cuprum. The word means"from Cyprus". Cyprus is the island where the Romans found copper. There has been jewelry made of copper dating further back, which means the Romans were not the ones to discover it. Copper's Molar Mass is 63.5463 ± 0.0001 g/mole. The oxidation states of copper are +1 and +2. Copper is located on the d block on the periodic table of elements in the 3rd energy level. It's to the right of nickel and to the left of zinc. Copper's family is know as transitional metals. Copper wiring Copper pipes Orbital Diagram 1s 2s 2p 3s 3p 4s 3d Electron Configuration 1s 2s 2p 3s 3p 4s 3d 2 2 6 2 6 1 10 Valence Electrons Copper has 2 valence electrons. Four Quantum Numbers ℓ l=2 n=4 m m s=-1/2 l=1 Lewis Dot Diagram Cu Uses The below chart shows where copper can be found in tons: Chile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,350,000
United States of America. . . . . . 1,890,000
Canada. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 740,000
Russia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .600,000
Indonesia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .380,000
Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420,000
Peru. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400,000
China . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .350,000
Zambia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .350,000
Poland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .340,000
Kazakstan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220,000
Philippines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115,000
Zaire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40,000
Other Countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,600,000
WORLD TOTAL-----------------------> 9,800,000 More Sources Copper is found in nature underground usually found within crustal rocks. It can also be present in many minerals. How copper is obtained is by mining it. It is then brought to a facility for smelting and there the ore becomes melted and purified. Bohr model diagram Copper is used in making pennies and other coins. Prominent compounds using copper are brass and bronze. Industrial uses are wires, plumbing, jewelry, building roofs, garden ornamental, weather vanes, gutters, and pipes can be made of copper. In humans, copper is essential to the proper functioning of organs and metabolic processes. Types of reactions copper is typically involved in is when copper is exposed to air and other chemicals over long periods of time the surface reactes to form copper oxide and turns green. Special Features Copper's unusual properties or characteristics are:
It's sometimes considered a semi noble metal
Copper's extremely high electrical conductivity, second to only silver
Copper's excellent thermal conductivity, which makes it the reference material for heating systems, drinking water, air conditioning/refrigeration and gas tubing. Copper's isotopes range from 58 to 70 which means there are 12 of them in total. Copper-63 and copper-65 are the most common isotopes (they have 34 and 36 neutrons, respectively) The copper electrode in a car battery reacts with acids to produce an electrical charge
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