Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Chinese Culture & Language

ESL p1
by

Kr En

on 22 February 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Chinese Culture & Language


GENDER EQUALITY
in recent decades there has been a heavy emphasis on women being equal to men
women now:
- receive 9 years compulsory education
- have equal political rights
- have equal employment opportunities
- have equal status in marriage
religious beliefs: taoism, buddhism, islamism, protestantism, catholicism or atheist

zodiac signs: those born in a particular
year are thought to portray the
characteristics of that animal
Values & Beliefs
Chinese Language
seven groups of dialect
- Mandarin is national language
- Cantonese, Wu, Xiang, Min, Hakka, Gan

Chinese characters represent an idea, concept or object
- they are NOT phonetic or alphabetic!

Pinyin is a system for transliterating Mandarin into 25 European characters (v is not included)

Chinese is tonal. Different tones or intonations distinguish words that otherwise are pronounced identically.
Challenges for the ELL
Demographics
the Chinese community make up the largest non-European ethnic origin in Canada

Kristin Engel
Chinese Culture & Language
Everyday Ways of Doing Things
Special Events
Spring Festival
Lantern Festival
Qingming Festival
Dragon Boat Festival
Double Seventh Festival
Moon Festival
National Day
mid Jan - mid Feb (15 days)
Marks the Lunar New Year,
largest festival of year;
parades, fireworks, dragon dancers
April 4th or 5th
Tomb-sweeping and paying respect
to the dead, spring outings,
flying kites
15th day of first lunar month
End of New Year period,
display red lanterns, folk dances
5th day of fifth lunar month
Day of worship, dragon boat racing,
wearing perfume pouches
7th day of seventh lunar month
Girls pray for skillful hands for sewing
similar to Valentine's day
15th day of eighth lunar month
Family gather to appreciate moon,
moon cake is eaten,
lanterns and lion dances
Oct 1st (up to seven days)
celebration of People's Republic of China
the oldest person is greeted first as a sign of respect
they do not write in red ink as it symbolizes protest or severe criticism
grandparents play a large role in looking after children, especially when the women go back to work
most wear simple and modest clothing everyday and save traditional attire for festivals, ceremonies, or religious occasions
MENU
Breakfast

- noodles, wheat bread, rice porridge with vegetables and pickles
Lunch

- rice, noodle soup, vegetables
Dinner

- rice, soup, vegetables in sauce, meat
Beverages
- tea, alcohol
*Meat may include: pork, chicken, shrimp & fish
All meals served with chopsticks
numbers - even numbers provide harmony and balance (but not 4 as it
is bad luck!)

colours -
yellow
symbolizes royalty and power to the throne
-
green
symbolizes money
-
red
is national color; represents happiness, beauty, success and good fortune
youth are expected to be obedient and respective towards elders, otherwise they bring shame to their family
the majority of Canadians with Chinese origin can converse in one of Canada's official languages
English only - 78%
French only - 1%
English and French 6%
Vancouver and Toronto are home to 72% of Chinese people in Canada
- TDSB and VSB have high numbers of Chinese children in their classrooms
in 2001, 63% of Canadians with Chinese origin spoke another language other than English or French at home
C
h
i
n
e
s
e
characters can be written either vertically or horizontally

every Chinese character represents one syllable and many are also words

words are made up of one or more characters

if a word has two syllables, it is necessary to write it with two characters; each of these characters has an independent meaning

most Chinese syllables consist of three elements
- initial sound - consonants
- final sound - contain at least one vowel
- tone
It's never too old to learn.
business is not discussed during meals
Chinese Syllables (Pinyin)
TEACHER TIP
: When marking,
choose a colour other than red!
L
a
n
g
u
a
g
e
basic literacy

knowledge of
3000-5000
characters is
needed

21 initial sounds:
b, c, ch, d, f, g, h, j, k, l, m, n, p, q, r, s, sh, t, x, z, zh

35 final sounds:
- 6 simple finals: a, e, i, o, u, ü
- 13 compound finals: ai, ao, ei, ia, iao, ie, iou, ou, ua, uai, üe, uei, uo
- 16 nasal finals:
-- 8 front nasals: an, en, ian, in, uan, üan, uen, ün
-- 8 back nasals: ang, eng, iang, ing, iong, ong, uang, ueng

additional syllables (5 special cases): er, hm, hng, ng, ~r

initials and finals plus the special cases result in 413 possible combinations

apply the four tones, total of around 1,600 unique syllables that represent thousands of Chinese characters!

adjustment process

Chinese is pictographic, English is alphabetic
- leads to difficulty with reading and spelling

Chinese uses tones to represent meaning, whereas in English changes in pitch express emotion

English has more vowel sounds leading to mispronunciation
sh
i
p / sh
ee
p

struggles with consonant sounds at the end of words, such as a double ‘l’ – leads to misspelling
be
ll
--> be
l

a period and comma take the place of one character, ELLs may replace letters with these punctuation marks
I am happ
.
I am happ
y.
hello
Punctuation !
difficult to hear the difference between
l
and
r
,
and
l
and
n
r
ake -->
l
ake

English uses verbs and tense to display meaning;
Chinese uses word order or shared understanding of context
eat / eats / ate / eaten
I
eats
pizza at lunch.

articles are not used in Chinese, it is difficult to use them properly
She is
a
tallest girl.

English uses a lot of phrasal verbs which do not exist in Chinese causing difficulty in comprehension
take on
give in

no gender distinction in Chinese, they all share the same sound
I have a brother.
She
is tall.
Challenges for the ELL
Program Support
be aware of Chinese holidays/festivals as students may be absent and will need to be given work in advance or need to be caught up

encourage the use of Chinese dialect in class and at home

correcting only one or two mistakes at a time to avoid frustration and overwhelming student

speaking in a clear voice to help with letter sound recognition and comprehension

encouraging ELLs to sound out words to help with spelling
medical beliefs: yin and yang balance
when choosing spouse, practical considerations are just as important as romance (many marriages are arranged)
several generations to live under one
roof; wife lives with husband’s family to look after them as they age
Program Support
preferential seating to help with comprehending oral communication

creating dual-language resources or personal dictionaries of commonly misspelled words, and verbs and tenses

using simple language, that is at ELLs level, in oral and written communication

using visuals to help teach concepts

cooperative learning (place students who speak Chinese in groups together)
Resources
http://www.chinahighlights.com/travelguide/culture/

http://www.china.org.cn/english/Political/26143.htm

http://www.china-un.ch/eng/rqrd/jblc/t210715.htm

http://www.everyculture.com/Bo-Co/China.html

http://www.travelchinaguide.com/essential/public-holiday.htm

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-621-x/89-621-x2006001-eng.htm

http://www.livescience.com/28823-chinese-culture.html

http://asiasociety.org/china-learning-initiatives/chinese-writing

http://mandarin.about.com/od/writingmandarin/a/chinese_punctuation_marks.htm

http://esl.fis.edu/grammar/langdiff/chinese.htm

http://www.translatorscafe.com/cafe/article84.htm

http://www.linguanaut.com/chinese_alphabet.htm

http://www.tdsb.on.ca/

https://www.vsb.bc.ca/
Full transcript