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Daimyo

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Sashie Sion

on 5 September 2013

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Transcript of Daimyo

The DAIMYO

What privileges did the Daimyos have?
The Daimyo’s had many privileges. The daimyo’s most significant privilege was their power to the land. They were holders of most of the land of Japan. The Daimyo’s also gained their income in taxes levied on land holdings and religious establishments. They also had a sense of power within the 11th and 12th century with the military (also known as samurai’s). but over the century their quantity of land has fluctuated due to fights they had over land consolidations.
What did they wear?
Battle attire
The daimyo wore similar battle attire to the samurai. They wore steel or iron plates sown together by a skilled craftsman and under the plates they wore quilted padding. The also wore a detailed mask that covered their head and sometimes neck.
Non-battle attire
The daimyo were recognisable by their Eboshis and fan. Eboshi were stiff hats make out of silk and paper and often held together by a white cord, or was pinned to the daimyo's topknot. The size and shape of the cap largely depended on the samurai's ran. Daimyo usually kept a folding fan in his belt. The was material wrapped around his waist. However as time evolved the Daimyo started to only wear the eboshis in formal events. In formal events a page also followed the Daimyo around, carrying there sword.

Where did they live and what sort of house did they live in?
Daimyo’s lived in the area that they owned which was a wide area as they were high in the feudal system. The Daimyo’s built big castles to show their power over the land. The castles were usually built in the hill country in japan so they could be high and look over the land on top of a hill.
What did the Daimyos eat?
As the Daimyos were very wealthy tempura usually a prawn or fish dipped in batter then deep fried was very popular. Also the Daimyos also drank sake regularly. Zoni (Rice cake soup), Hasu (Lotus Roots), Kaki (Oysters), Kuri (Chestnuts) and Shiitake (Mushroom) was also very common.
One of the castles belonging to the Daimyos
Tempura Prawn
Who were they answerable to?
The Daimyo’s were answerable to the Shoguns and of course the Emperor. According to the Feudal System pyramid, one section is answerable to the section above (Prezi below)
The Feudal System in Japan
The Daimyo’s work was to serve the Shoguns. The Daimyos also were in power of the military or samurai’s. The Daimyos also were getting food from the farmers and were mostly getting rice from them instead of money, this was to pay for the land they were working on.
What sort of work did they do?
Daimyo
THE POWER OF THE DAIMYOS
The daimyo were the most second most powerful rulers in Japan 9the first being the shoguns). In the sometime before the 10th century the land of japan was divided into section and these sections were given out to samurai. These samurais became Daimyos- powerful landowners and military dictators.
Military Power- The daimyos had complete control over there samurais. Japanese warriors were amazing fights making the daimyo feared because of their military power.
Political- They had a lot of influence over society because they controlled everybody on their land.
Economic- The daimyos collected from the farmers and merchants. They received 10,000 grains of rice in which were enough to feed one man for an entire year and collected money from taxes.


BATTLE ATTIRE
The daimyo wore similar battle attire to the samurai. They wore steel or iron plates sown together by a skilled craftsman and under the plates they wore quilted padding. The also wore a detailed mask that covered their head and sometimes neck.
NON-BATTTLE ATTIRE
The daimyo were recognisable by their Eboshis and fan. Eboshi were stiff hats make out of silk and paper and often held together by a white cord, or was pinned to the daimyo's topknot. The size and shape of the cap largely depended on the samurai's ran. Daimyo usually kept a folding fan in his belt. The was material wrapped around his waist. However as time evolved the Daimyo started to only wear the eboshis in formal events. In formal events a page also followed the Daimyo around, carrying there sword.

What did they wear?

Below are the two feudal systems of Medieval Japan and England. It is amazing how two countries so far away from each other developed such similar systems.
Japanese Feudal pyramid English Feudal Pyramid
Emperor Pope
Shogun Royals
Daimyo Lords/Nobles
Samurai Knights
Ronin Freemen
Peasants Yeomen
Artisans Servants
Merchants Peasants/ Villains
They both controlled the fighting social group below them (samurai or knights). They both owned land that they rented to peasants. They both were high on the pyramid.

What social group do they equate with in Medieval England?
The Daimyo spend their leisure time obsessing over tea, managing their household, writing poetry, studying swordsmanship and horsemanship and hunting. They are also highly amused by constructing large and expensive gardens and spend alot of their leasure time showing them off, designing, constructing or maintaining or them.
How did they spend their leisure time?
Many people thought the daimyo lead a simple life- that was not the case. The daimyo fought constantly to keep their land and life.

“Power is always dangerous. Power attracts the worst and corrupts the best.” -Edward Abbey

There were some daimyo, who despite their wealthy lifestyle and already great power, wanted more power. They put the rest of the daimyos in danger.

The fight between two daimyos and there samurais were often very bloody due to the great skills and ferocity of Japanese fighters. Sometimes the fight came down to the geographic landscape.


What threats or dangers did they face?
Full transcript