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Art Movement - Pop Art

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Leon Gabriel Orea

on 17 January 2013

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Transcript of Art Movement - Pop Art

Emerged in the mid 1950s in London and they called it Propaganda Art instead of Pop Art. Developed in the late 1950s in the United States. A form of art that depicts objects or scenes from everyday life and employs techniques of commercial art and popular illustration. Andy Warhol August 6, 1928

Pennsylvania, USA

Died at the age of 58

Focused on painting and cinema MARILYN MONROE Andy Warhol painted a variety of paintings of the actress Marilyn Monroe after she committed suicide in 1962. Warhol made it his goal to mass-produce his art by using a method called silk screen.

For his paintings of Marilyn Monroe, Warhol used a photograph from a publicity shoot for the film, Niagara. Andy Warhol painted Marilyn Monroe's paintings with the colors: green, blue and lemon yellow turquoise. Next he silk screened her face on top; in this way, he created different styles and depicted many different colors. He started doing this painting on the year 1967 and finished it at the same year.

Andy Warhol's artwork and paintings of Marilyn Monroe can be viewed at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Richard Hamilton February 24, 1922

Pimlico, England

Died at the age of 89

Focused on collage, painting and graphics JUST WHAT IS IT THAT MAKES TODAY'S
HOMES SO DIFFERENT, SO APPEALING? ‘Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing?’ is a collage made by Richard Hamilton which got popular and is also considered one of the early works of pop art. This was made for an exhibition called "This Is Tomorrow" in England. It is considered as the first genuine pop art work which consisted of images taken from American magazine. Black and white images along with colors are mixed which was made at the year 1956

The collage basically represents the inner desire of “perfect life” of people, which is projected through young bodybuilder, beautiful, naked women and all the luxuries like the vacuum cleaner, TV set, sofa and a record player which belongs to the 50s and 60s period.

This artwork can be found in Kunsthalle Tübingen museum in Germany. Roy Lichtenstein October 27, 1923

New York, USA

Died at the age of 73

Focused on painting and sculpture
CRYING GIRL ‘Crying Girl’ derives from comic book subject matter that first brought Lichtenstein into public attention. Published to announce Lichtenstein’s exhibition at Leo Castelli Gallery (New York), on the year 1963, the expression of this young heroine cheats at our heartstrings, reminding us of lost loves, melodramatic moments and a regretfully changing world. This particular example is in excellent condition and is framed.

This artwork can be found in Milwaukee Art Museum in Wisconsin USA It was called Pop Art because the subject in the painting was popular. It is the object or the subject in the painting that is popular. "Everything is beautiful.
Pop is everything."
- Andy Warhol As a style, Pop Art often looks flat, with opaque color rather than having depth created by layers of transparent, glazed color. Once you're familiar with a few Pop Art paintings, it's a distinctive art style that's quite easy to recognize. By: Leon Gabriel Orea By: Leon Gabriel Orea
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