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Bariatric Surgery & Its Impact on Sleep

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Joyce Xie

on 24 November 2013

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Transcript of Bariatric Surgery & Its Impact on Sleep

Bariatric Surgery & Its Impact on Sleep
Background
1) Prevalence of Obesity has escalated significantly worldwide. This has translated into increased prevalence of obesity associated morbidities including Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS) and sleep disorders.





Aims & Objectives
To explore the effect of bariatric surgical intervention on sleep in morbidly obese patients with and without OSAS.
Conclusions
3) High prevalence of OSA
(55.1%)
in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.
Results
Methods
Patient Population
XIE HUIZHUANG


School of Medicine, University College Cork. Department of Respiratory Medicine and Surgery, Bon Secours Hospital, Cork, Ireland
Why Bariatric Surgery?
1) Bariatric Surgery is currently the
only established treatment
that randomized controlled trials have shown to produce sustained weight loss in morbidly obese patients.


All Patients who underwent bariatric surgery at the Bon Secours Hospital, Cork from June 2009 to July 2012.
Data Collection
Age, Gender, BMI, Apnoea Hypopnoea Index (AHI) and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionaires (FOSQ) scores were prospectively evaluated before and after surgical intervention in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.
A joint research with
Mr Colm O'Boyle and Dr Liam Doherty

3) OBJECTIVE Measures of Sleep
a) No of patients off the mask (Post Op)
b) Repeat Sleep Studies Post Operation
4) SUBJECTIVE Measure of Sleep

a) Functional Outcomes of Sleep
Questionnaires (FOSQ)
4) Positive impact on sleep in both patients with and without OSAS.
87.9% (p<0.05)
reported improved FOSQ scores.
5) In those with OSA, there is a dramatic benefit with
90.7%
successfully off the mask and only a small minority requiring nocturnal positive airway support.
Aims & Objectives
Methods
Results
Conclusions
Complications of Obesity
To date, 19 out of 52 (36.5%) patients have accepted an invitation for repeat sleep studies at 6 months post surgery.
4 out the 19 have no recorded pre- AHI readings. 15 completed Pre & Post AHI scores were collected.
17 of these 19 patients (89.5%) were sufficiently cured of OSA based on repeated sleep studies results that PAP was discontinued.
2 patients had persisting severe OSAS despite a marked reduction in BMI.
2) Strong association between morbid obesity and OSAS. Anecdotally, daytime sleepiness is also noted in the morbidly obese without OSAS.
2) Limited data exists on the association of bariatric surgery and its impact on sleep.
3) First study of Bariatric Surgery and Its Impact on sleep done in Ireland.
Methods
Background
Aims & Objectives
Results
Conclusions
Background
Aims & Objectives
Methods
Results
Conclusions
Aims & Objectives
Methods
Results
Conclusions
Background
1) Patients' Parameters
2) Sleep Study
92
(55.1%)
out of 167 total subjects were diagnosed OSA.
Background
Aims & Objectives
Methods
Results
Conclusions
Special Thanks to:
Project Supervisors: Dr Doherty & Mr Colm O'Boyle, Bon Secours Hospital (Cork)
1) Research Abstract accepted by
British Sleep Society
. Invited to present at the British Sleep Society Sleep Conference, 25th Anniversary Scientific Meeting 2013, 17th- 19th October 2013, Edinburgh.

2) Poster Presentation at the
Singapore Health and Biomedical Conference (SHBC)
held on 28th, 29th September 2013.

3) H, Xie, C O'Boyle, L Doherty. Bariatric Surgery and Its Impact on Sleep.
Annals of the Academy of Medicine
, Singapore. 2013 Sep; 42(9):112.

4)
UCC Research Travel Award.
120 sleep studies were performed.
Using Paired t- test
1) Patients Parameters:
167 patients
assessed. Predominantly women (75.4%), in their mid forties, and are grossly obese.
2)
Mean reduction of BMI 12
at 6 month post op.
7 were uncontactable.
39 out 43 patients
(90.7%)
have since been taken off their CPAP masks.
Results:
PATIENT PARAMETERS
1)
167 patients
were assessed.
2)
126 (75.4%)
females.
3) Median Reduction in BMI of
12
(0.613-26.70) kg/m at
6.00
(0.6-13) month.
2
Improvement in FOSQ scores
remained significant (p<0.05)
in those with and without OSA.
Full transcript