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Floating Orb

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by

nickolas viancos

on 13 May 2011

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Transcript of Floating Orb

FLOATING ORB FLOATING ORB Do different materials, (HAIR, FUR, OR WOOL) build up better static charges? PROBLEM BY:NICKOLAS Hypothesis
If I test each material, HAIR, FUR, and WOOL, which will be the best conductor of static electricity? I think the hair will be the best conductor because I have seen a video of hair creating static electricity and it lasted a long time, almost 12 seconds. Variables
The independent variable is the material, wool, fur or hair.
The dependent variable is the amount of time the static charges lasted with the materials.
The control variables are the balloon and small tinsel orb and large tinsel orb. Research
Source 1
Bibliographic information: Electricity and magnetism
I learned that everything around us is made of atoms. I also learned that scientists so far have found 117 different kinds of atoms. In addition, I learned that everything you see is made of different combinations of these atoms. Source 2
Bibliographic information: Forces and movement
I learned that positive and negative charges behave in interesting ways. I also learned that things with the same charge, both positive, both negative will repel. In addition, I learned that as you walk across carpet, electrons move from the carpet to you. Source 3
Bibliographic information: World book/Encyclopedia
I learn that you walk across the carpet and reach for the door knob and it zaps you. I also learned that some materials hold their electrons very tightly. In addition, I learned that other materials have some loosely held electrons, which move through them very easily. Materials, Procedures, and Safety
Materials
-Brite star tinsel icicles; thinnest and narrowest as possible; mylar
-Rubber balloon Procedures:
1. Take out the balloon and blow it up.
2. Gather 2 pieces of mylar tinsel and tie a knot on each end to create the small orb.
3. Gather 6 pieces of mylar tinsel and tie a knot on each end to create the large orb.
4. Cut off the lose mylar strands just past each knot.
5. Gather the 3 conductors (hair, fur, wool).
6. Rub the balloon on your hair for 10 seconds charge it.
7. Hold the small orb by the knot and drop it over the balloon to see if it floats and for how long.
8. Record how long it was in the air.
9. Spray balloon with water and dry it off. 10. Rub the balloon on your hair for 10 seconds to recharge it.
11. Hold the large orb by the knot and drop it over the balloon to see if it floats and for how long.
12. Record how long it was in the air.
13. Spray balloon with water and dry it off.
14. Rub the balloon on fur for 10 seconds. (I used my cat Sammy)
15. Hold the small orb by the knot and drop it over the balloon to see if it floats and for how long.
16. Record how long it was in the air.
17. Spray balloon with water and dry it off.
18. Rub the balloon on fur for 10 seconds.
19. Hold the large orb by the knot and drop it over the balloon to see if it floats and for how long.
20. Record how long it was in the air.
21. Spray balloon with water and dry it off. 21.
22. Rub the balloon on the wool for 10 seconds.
23. Hold the small orb by the knot and drop it over the balloon to see if it floats and for how long.
24. Record how long it was in the air.
25. Spray balloon with water and dry it off.
26. Rub the balloon on wool for 10 seconds.
27. Hold the large orb by the knot and drop it over the balloon to see if it floats and for how long.
28. Record how long it was in the air.
29. Spray balloon with water and dry it off.
30. Repeat steps 6-29, 2 more times. Safety
Since I am working with my cat, I had to make sure that he was very calm while I rubbed the balloon on him. I told my mom just in case he scratched me so she would be prepared to clean the scratch. I also had my brother play with him while I rubbed the balloon on his fur.
Also since I am working with my own head of hair, I made sure to handle the balloon gently so it wouldn’t pop and hurt my ears. Observations:
Smell: N/A
Taste: N/A
Touch: the tinsel and balloon
Hear: the static charge crackle while rubbing the balloon on the wool, hair and fur
See: the orbs float above the balloon or stick to the balloon Conclusion
In my hypothesis, I said that the hair would be the best conductor of static electricity and the worst conductor would be fur because I have seen a video of hair creating static electricity and it lasted a long time, about 12 seconds. After testing all of the materials three times, I have concluded that my hypothesis was incorrect in that the fur is the best conductor. In all trials, rubbing the balloon on my cat’s fur created the greatest static charge and it held the static charge the longest. I did not expect the fur to be a very good conductor but it turned out to be the best. The hair was the next best conductor followed by the wool.
In my research, I learned that everything around us is made of atoms. I also learned that scientists have found 117 different combinations of these atoms and these are called elements. Each atom contains a positive, negative or neutral charge. Positive and negative charges behave in interesting ways. Objects with the same charge, positive or negative, will repel away from each other. If the objects have different charges they will stick together or be magnet like. To start fresh, I found that I had to squirt water on the balloon and dry it so it had the same charge as the tinsel. When I would just try a different conductor without the water, the balloon and the tinsel would get different charges and stick together. I also found out that if the tinsel touched something it would lose its static charge and fall down.
I would like to do this experiment again testing carpet, nylon, cloth and rubber. I learned from my research that carpet and nylon might also be good conductors. I also read that rubber and cloth are not good conductors. I would like to test how they compare with the fur. I would also like to test to see which of them would be the best conductors. I know in the winter if I scoot my feet across the floor, I can shock my brother. Now that transfer of static electricity is fun!
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