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Light Painting Workshop

Art, Technology and Inquiry
by

Ahmad Hernandez

on 2 April 2012

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Transcript of Light Painting Workshop

Student Rules
You need:
Get ready!
Ahmad Hernandez
Conclusion
ahernandez@fusionacademy.com
A camera
A dark room
A light source
A tripod
Cover the windows of your classroom with cardboard to make it sufficiently dark. A semi-dark room can work, too.
A tripod keeps your camera still and allows you to take light painting pictures by yourself.

Small tripods cost between $15 and $30, but are only for smaller cameras.

Larger tripods cost between $25 and $80.

You can also stabilize the camera on a bookshelf or boxes.
Michael’s usually has packs of 15 glowsticks for $1. Warn students not to bend the glowsticks too much.

LED lights also work really well. Electronic Parts Outlet in Houston sells 4 "finger lights" for $2.50. Look for deals online or at Fry's Electronics.

Candles are NOT RECOMMENDED!

Small flashlights may work, as well as Christmas lights. Test these items first.
First and foremost, TEST YOUR CAMERA AND OTHER EQUIPMENT BEFORE YOU LET YOUR STUDENTS TRY THIS!!
Aperture (aka f-Stop)
The opening that you can adjust to let more or less light into the camera. The higher the number, the smaller the aperture. You need a small aperture (f4.0 or higher) for light painting.
Shutter
The part of the camera that opens and closes, letting light pass through the aperture and onto the image sensor. You need a LONG shutter speed (3-5 seconds) for light painting.
ISO
A standard that describes how sensitive the “film”is to light. An ISO of 100 is great for bright sunlight, while an ISO of 1600 works well for action or low light settings. Start with an ISO of 400, and adjust as needed.
1.) Set your camera for a slow shutter speed
2.) If you are by yourself, set the timer
3.) Mount the camera on your tripod
4.) Set the camera and frame the shot
5.) Turn off the lights
6.) Get your light source ready
7.) Turn the camera timer on and move into frame
8.) When the timer goes off, move the light source around
9.) Review the image you took
You may need to change shutter speed, aperture and ISO to get the effect you want.
1.) Be aware that the lights will go out.
2.) Take turns moving the lights and taking pictures.
3.) Be safe! No running or horseplay.
4.) Have fun!
Light Painting:
Art, Technology
and Inquiry

Extensions
This activity:
Is hands-on
Encourages
creativity
Uses technology
Fosters inquiry--
"What will happen if..."
Write your name in light
Use a mirror
Use a semi-lit room
Make a slideshow or video
Full transcript