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Participles

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by

Lara Kibler

on 25 April 2013

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Transcript of Participles

Last form of Verbals Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. You already have this info in your notes, but as a reminder:

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective.

A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen.

Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified.

(Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

Example:
The truck swerving and sliding hit the brick wall.
Participial phrase- swerving and sliding
Modifies - truck Participles A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective.
A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly.
Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified.
(Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.) Instructions: Find the participles in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The bike had a broken spoke.

2. Her smiling face made everyone happy.

3. The frightened child was crying loudly.

4. The people were frightened by the growling dog.

5. The squeaking wheel needs some grease. Answers:

1. broken modifying spoke

2. smiling modifying face

3. frightened modifying child

4. growling modifying dog

5. squeaking modifying wheel A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Example: Trying to open the gate, I tore my coat. Instructions: Find the participial phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Taking my time, I hit the basket.

2. Shouting angrily, the man chased the thief.

3. Exhausted from the hike, Jim dropped to the ground.

4. Grinning sheepishly, the boy asked for a date. Answers:

1. Taking my time modifies the subject I

2. Shouting angrily modifies the subject man

3. Exhausted from the hike modifies the subject Jim

4. Grinning sheepishly modifies the subject boy Instructions: Find the participial phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The man running slowly still finished the race.

2. The boy having been scolded finally did his work.

3. The teacher, having retired, could now travel widely.

4. The soldier, having saluted his superior, continued on his way. Key:
1. running slowly modifies man

2. having been scolded modifies boy

3. having retired modifies teacher

4. having saluted his superior modifies soldier
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