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Game based learning - is it relevant for HE

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by

Emma King

on 9 March 2016

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Transcript of Game based learning - is it relevant for HE

Games and learning
Examples
Game based learning
Station
£75
£200
Station
Station
Station
Games that are designed for a purpose other than pure entertainment, usually education
Using game like elements to support motivation and engagement
Serious Games
Gamification
Games in which learners acquire, and master, new knowledge and skills by playing.

Market Place - companies competing for market share
Pulse!! - practicing clinical skills aiding response mechanisms for large-scale incidents
SIMPLE - virtual town in need of legal support
Who is Herring Hale? Treasure hunt induction to university services
http://www.elderquest.org/
Racing Academy - Engineers manipulating car specifications before racing
Purpose built
Adaptations
Games that motivate
What is a game?
Competition
Challenge
Exploration
Fantasy
Goals
Interaction
Outcomes
People
Rules
Safety

Whitton (2010)
Game based learning - is it relevant for Higher Education?

The power of play
Off the shelf
Characteristics
Flow
More examples of digital games
Ten step process of game design
Implementation
What next?
Immersive
Visual and Logical
Strategic
Find out more
For or against?
Embedding
Extending
Evaluating
How does the game fit with the rest of the learning activities?
What skills and knowledge do learners need to play?
How long do they need?
How did students engage?
What did students learn?
How does it compare with other learning activities?
What will follow the game?
How will students build on what they learned?
What are the opportunities for reflection?
http://bit.ly/mpforaweek
http://bit.ly/csiexp
CSI
http://bit.ly/empir
Civilization
http://bit.ly/mahchem
http://playgen.com
Is game based learning relevant for teaching in Higher Education?
Pairs - to test out knowledge
Board game - building/narrating a 'story'
Connect 4 - more advanced knowledge testing and application
http://bit.ly/portgames
http://bit.ly/gblres
Types of games
Community Chest
Community Chest
Luxury Tax
Problem solving at various levels
Progress and rewards
Narrative devices
Influences on outcomes
Regular delivery of new problems/events
Potential for a large, active community
Based on simple, existing technologies or media

Moseley (2012)
The power of play
Events of instruction
?
Electric Company
Chance
A game of pairs
?
Water Works
Definition
A game is a challenging activity, structured with rules, goals, progression and rewards, that is separate from the real world, and undertaken with a spirit of playfulness; it is also usually (but not always) played with other people.

Moseley & Whitton (2015)

"The state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter."

Flow theory suggests the following features add to a game's enjoyment:
challenge
complete absorption
clear goals
immediate feedback
concentration
sense of control
loss of self-consciousness
transformation of time

Csikszentmihalyi (1992, p. 4)
Key features
Gain attention
Inform of objective
Recall prior knowledge
Present instruction
Provide guidance
Provide practice
Provide feedback
Assess performance
Enhance retention and transfer

Hirumi, Appleman and Van Eck (2010)
Phase 1
Context
Phase 2
Grand design
Phase 3
Refinement
Define the learning objectives
Identify any constraints
Determine the game type
Develop the core mechanics
Refine the game balance
Create and test the first prototype
Add a narrative
Add game dynamics
Check learning objectives
Develop the final game
Register interest in a game design workshop
Visit the Serious Games Institute (Coventry)
Six week MOOC http://bit.ly/gamesie
Full transcript