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Caesar's English

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by

Jennifer McMillian

on 3 February 2017

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Transcript of Caesar's English

Lesson XIV
Caesar's English

Classic Words

Verdure
Meaning: disturbance; suddenly swells up, sudden uproar and clamor.
Tumult
Literary Connection:

Martin Luther King Jr. recalled, "the erupting tumult and catastrophe in the streets of the city."
Meaning: traditional or conventional in your views, to believe what society expects you to, to your opinion (dox) straight (ortho) in the eyes of others.
Orthodox
Literary Connection:

In John F. Kennedy's, Profiles in Courage, "any unpopular or unorthodox course arouses a storm of protests."


Why do you think an unorthodox course of action lends itself to a "storm of protests"?

Does this happen in our society today?
irreverent; unholy
Profane
Literary Connection:

Frederick Douglass, in his famous
Narrative
, says that Mr. Plummer was "a profane swearer and a savage monster."



Meaning: ambiguous, or to say or suggest two things at the same time
Equivocal
Connection:

Have you ever experienced a time when you were equivocal or unequivocal in a discussion?






Meaning: Vegetation or greenery
Literary Connection: In
Moby Dick
, Herman Melville observed the "spring verdure peeping forth through the February snow."

The opposite of equivocal is unequivocal in which
you do not take a stand.
Full transcript