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by

Aneta Kunecka

on 3 May 2015

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Transcript of Loading

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Aneta, Zach, Alex, Nikki, Josh
Shearing
Tension
Two collinear forces acting on a material in opposite direction directed away from eachother
3 types of mechanical loads:
Compression
Tension
Shearing
Load is an
external
force!
Compression
Types
of
Loads
Axial
True compression and tension
Load occurs along axis
Collinear forces
Occurs straight through center of bone
Bending
Contains different lines of application; not collinear
Is within the same plane (coplanar)
Compression occurs on one end
Tension occurs on the other
Torsional
Contains compression, tension and shearing
This load twists around the long axis
Combined
The most common type of load
Contains simultaneous loads
Axial
Bending
Trosional
Guess the Load!
Bending!
Torsional!
Axial!
Combined!
Torsional!
Combined!
Bending!
Axial!
Hooke's Law

The relationship between load and deformation
(The larger the load, the greater the deformation)
Also described as friction
Two parallel but not colliner forces acting on a material in opposite directions on the material
Bending!
Combined!
Torsional!
Axial!
Loading

and Our Careers
Physical Therapy
Coaching
Physical Education
Athletic Training:
Prevention
Manual Therapy
Manipulation:
slow controlled process over a period of time
intended to improve elasticity
combination of loads usually axial and torsional
Massage:
repetitive rubbing (shearing)
used to improve interstitial fluid flow
Mobilization:
intended to loosen a restricted joint and increase its range of motion
example: glenohumeral joint mob: axial and bending load
Athletic Training:
Diagnosis
Basketball players execute large amounts of cutting movements during competition -> combined loading
A high valgus (bending) load applied to the knee joint increases the number of knee injuries
Information obtained through this study may provide insight on loading applied to the lower extremity joints in various basketball movements
Two collinear forces acting on a material in the opposite direction directed toward eachother
Knowledge and understanding of loads as a teacher is important to teach to students in order to have proper form and technique in all exercises and reduce the risk of injury.
While performing a squat, it is important for students to understand the compressive stress/axial load of the barbell and weight straght down against the student as the ground provides opposite force, so that they are reminded to maintain that axis from shoulders to the ground.
Constant load on joints
Excessive in sports
Understanding loads, ATCs can better assess and educate
Lateral Patellar Dislocation:

Combined load: axial and torsional
Shearing: between patella and femur
Communication to football players of importance of breakdown before cuts.
During athletic training the understanding of loads while assessing an athlete's injury is extremely crucial
By using axial loads, bending loads, etc...an ATC can discover the MOI by what the athlete describes or from what occured just moments ago
Ex: MOI of UCL sprain- valgus force applied to the lateral elbow (bending load)
Those loads can also be applied during special tests to determine whether the athlete is suffering from this injury or not
Ex: Apley's Comp./Dist. test for Meniscal lesions
applying both an axial and torsional load
Full transcript