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Apostrophes

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by

Katie Maneval

on 26 October 2013

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Transcript of Apostrophes

Apostrophes By: Katie Maneval, Jocelyn Stalker
What is an Apostrophe?
Apostrophe definition
: the sign ('), as used: to indicate the
omission of one or more letters in a word, whether
unpronounced or pronounced, to indicate the possessive case, or to indicate plurals of abbreviations and symbols.

Three Uses of the Apostrophe
1.) To form possessives of nouns

2.) To show the omission of letters

3.) To indicate certain plurals of lowercase letters

What Are Some Everyday Apostrophe Uses?
don't
=
do not
who's
=
who is

a's
=
more than one "a"
+'s
=
more than one "+"

Anna's
=
belonging to Anna
kittens'
=
belonging to the kittens
Apostrophes to Show Possession Continued
Apostrophes to Show Possession
Apostrophes with Personal Pronouns
Rule:
personal pronouns do not use apostrophes

Examples:

whose
theirs
yours
his
Rule:
to form the possessive of a singular noun, simply add 's

Examples:

dog
->
dog's
Todd
->
Todd's
Rule
: to form the possessive of a plural noun or a singular noun ending in s, add '

Examples:
athletes
->
athletes'
cactus
->
cactus'
Exception:
plural possessives not ending in s

Rule:
to form the possessive of a plural noun not ending in s, add 's

Examples:
children
->
children's
men
->
men's
Apostrophes with Indefinite Pronouns
Rule:
indefinite pronouns can be made possessive with 's

Examples:

everyone
->
everyone's
somebody
->
somebody's
Apostrophes to Show Omission
Rule:
apostrophes show letters missing, and fall exactly where the missing letters go

Examples:
biscuits and gravy
->
biscuits 'n' gravy
government
->
gov't
Apostrophes to Show Possession Continued
Apostrophes with Hyphens and Joint Possession
Rule:
only the last word of the phrase receives an 's

Examples:
Billy and Ashley
->
Billy and Ashley's
mother-in-law
->
mother-in-law's
Apostrophes With Multiple Individuals
Rule:
when two or more people possess something individually, they each receive 's

Example:
Matt's dog and Damien's dog
->
Matt's and Damien's dogs


Apostrophes With Time And Money Words
Rule:
time and money words require an apostrophe when used as possessive adjectives

Examples:
in a week's time
a dollar's worth of candy
Apostrophes With Letters, Signs, Etc.
Rule:
to form plurals of letters, numbers, signs and words referred to as words, use 's

Examples:
+'s
3's
f's
or's
W
H
I
T
E
-
E
R
A
S
E

B
O
A
R
D
S
!
1.) She doesnt know why mashed potatoes n gravy are edible.
2.) Kaseys' mom doesn't like the guy who's house is green.
3.) Jocelyn Stalkers stalker's should get A's in math.
4.) The scientists cats will only eat food the same
c
o
l
o
r

as the lab coat of their owner.
5.)
Sasha sells seashells at the sea shore. She also reads Mr. McGarry's and Mrs. Casteel's book.
6.)
8.)
9.)
10.)
Tiebreaker, 11.) In a year's time, Daniel's and Larry's alarm clocks will turn into dragons.
Tiebreaker, 12.)

All the students hats went flying into the air at graduation.
There aint nothing better than watching your corn grow while drinking sweet tea.
I walked over to Katies house today to bake cookies.
Your or You're ???
7.) And now ________ telling me you already went to Walmart to get the pillow pet?
Im going down to the fair, and dont tell him whos going with me.

Shes going for a run on the beach
.
Works Cited
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/apostrophes-and-plurals?page=1#sthash.ziOAjCyV.dpuf
http://drgrammar.org/frequently-asked-questions#70
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/621/01/
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/apostrophe?s=t
Full transcript