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SpringBoard ELA Level 1 Activity 1.6

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by

Anna Marie Garrett

on 13 September 2013

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Transcript of SpringBoard ELA Level 1 Activity 1.6

Activity 1.6
A Lion's Narrative

Vocabulary that relates to a Narrative
setting
characterization
conflict
resolution
dialogue
first person point of view
narrative
narrative
consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story
a narrator
narrates
fairytale
anecdote
Napoleon was involved in conversation with a colonel of a Hungarian battalion who had been taken prisoner in Italy. The colonel mentioned he had fought in the army of Maria Theresa. "You must have a few years under your belt!" exclaimed Napoleon. "I'm sure I've lived sixty or seventy years," replied the colonel. "You mean to say," Napoleon continued, "you have not kept track of the years you have lived?"

The colonel promptly replied, "Sir, I always count my money, my shirts, and my horses - but as for my years, I know nobody who wants to steal them, and I shall surely never lose them."
Embedded Assessment 1.1 will be a personal narrative.
Read "Academic Vocabulary" on p 12.

Read "Narrative Writing."
Read...
Explain why people like narratives.
What do you already know about "The Lion King" or Disney Movies in general?
As we watch the clip...
Seat 1 will take notes about the setting with exact details and sensory language.
Seat 2 will take notes about the feelings of the characters using exact nouns and vivid adjectives.
Seats 3 & 4 will take notes about the important dialogue, trying to capture the actual wording.
All 1's will meet by the television, all 2's will meet by the vertical file (by the bookcases), and all of the 3's and 4's will meet back by my desk.
Now return to your team, in a round robin, starting with seat 1, give the information from your column to the other members of your group.
Now we will share out our information.
Read...
The Word Connections box on p 13.
The Academic Vocabulary box.
Write or Sketch the sequence of events for this clip for number 2.
As you do the Writing Prompt for number 3, you may want to take a quick look at what we said goes into a good personal narrative from the Writing Workshop 4 handout. Also, STAY in character, use "I" instead of Nala/Simba or he/she when talking about your character.
All 1's will meet by the television, all 2's will meet by the vertical file (by the bookcases), and all of the 3's and 4's will meet back by my desk.
Now return to your team, in a round robin, starting with seat 1, give the information from your column to the other members of your group.
Now we will share out our information.
Theorize why people have such a strong need for narratives to be told in chronological order.
Explain what difference the point of view makes on the story that is told.
Explain how plot sequencing, dialogue, setting, and the characters’ feelings are interconnected in a narrative.
The paragraph and chart at the top of p 14.
Read number 1, then with your face partner fill in the chart with no less than ten words in each column.
Read number 2 on p 15, we will mark the text together.
Read number 3 and go back and mark the text of the personal narrative that you wrote on p 13
For Homework you will re-write your personal narrative adding in all of the transitions, sensory language, and dialogue.
When you write dialogue remember these examples:
"Quick, run over here," summoned Zazu.
"Nala," chided Simba, "everything will be just fine."
Read...
Speculate why sensory details have such a profound effect on our judgment of whether a story is just good or REALLY good.
Full transcript